Strategic Prevention Framework – Partnerships for Success (SPF-PFS)

Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) 

DEADLINE: Applications due April 12, 2016

AWARD: Total anticipated award amount of $1,230,000 with individual awards ranging from $318,543 to $1,230,000 per year for up to 5 years. 

SPF-PFS states must use at least $150,000 per year of their total annual awards to support their current SEOW efforts or to develop new SEOW efforts. SPF-PFS tribal entities must use at least $50,000 per year of their total annual awards to support their current SEOW efforts or to develop new SEOW efforts. [Note: SEOW funds are not intended to replace allocating funds for comprehensive state/tribal evaluations and SAMHSA’s Cross Site Evaluation.] After subtracting $150,000 (states) or $50,000 (tribes) per year from their total annual awards, grantees must use their remaining funds as follows:

  • State Grantees are required to use a minimum of 85 percent of their remaining funds to fund subrecipient communities that demonstrate a need for prevention programming in their selected prevention priority(ies).
  • Tribal Grantees are required to use a minimum of 70 percent of their remaining funds to fund subrecipient communities that demonstrate a need for prevention programming in their selected prevention priority(ies).

NUMBER OF AWARDS: 3 awards.

ELIGIBILITY: Eligibility is limited to states and tribal entities that have completed a SPF SIG grant and are not currently receiving funds through SAMHSA’s SPF-PFS grant. 

Current SPF-PFS and Strategic Prevention Framework State Incentive Grant (SPF SIG) grantees (with the exception of eligible SPF-PFS and SPF SIG grantees that are in a No Cost Extension) are excluded from applying for the SPF-PFS grant because they already have the resources in place to support the SPF infrastructure and address their areas of highest need, which can include underage drinking or prescription drug misuse. 

TARGET POPULATION: Grantees are expected to build capacity in communities of high need to address one or both of two national priorities: 1) underage drinking among persons aged 12 to 20; and/or 2) prescription drug misuse among persons aged 12 to 25. 

In identifying and selecting communities of high need to be funded with SPF-PFS funds, states/tribes, in conjunction with their SEOWs, must be able to describe a population that is:

  1. A specific geographically defined area; or
  2. A specifically defined population based on a culture, federally recognized tribe, ethnicity, language, occupation, gender, or other specifically described identity, within a specific geographic area; or
  3. A specific population defined by a school, military base, campus, or other institutional setting;

where the population described has or is at risk of having a higher than average prevalence rate of underage drinking and/or prescription drug misuse; or a higher than average prevalence rate of the additional, data-driven prevention priority the state/tribe is proposing to address, if any; 
AND
where the population or area has limited resources or has had fewer opportunities or less success in identifying and bringing to bear resources to address the identified priority(ies). 

SUMMARY: The SPF-PFS grant program is intended to prevent the onset and reduce the progression of substance misuse and its related problems while strengthening prevention capacity and infrastructure at the state, tribal, and community levels. 

The purpose of this grant program is to address two of the nation’s top substance abuse prevention priorities: 1) underage drinking among persons aged 12 to 20; and 2) prescription drug misuse among persons aged 12 to 25. States/tribes must use a data-driven approach to identify which of the substance abuse prevention priorities listed above they propose to address using SPF-PFS funds. States/tribes must use SPF-PFS funds to address one or both of these priorities. At their discretion, states/tribes may also use grant funds to target an additional, data-driven substance abuse prevention priority (marijuana, heroin, etc.) in their state/tribe. 

To meet the goals of the SPF-PFS grant program, SAMHSA expects grantees to use the SPF process at both the state/tribal and community levels. The SPF represents a five-step, data-driven process used to: assess needs (Step 1); build capacity (Step 2); engage in a strategic planning process (Step 3); implement a comprehensive, evidence-based prevention approach (Step 4); and, evaluate implementation and related outcomes (Step 5). The guiding principles of cultural competence and sustainability are included in each of the five steps. The use of the SPF process is critical to ensuring that states/tribes and their communities work together to use data-driven decision making processes to develop effective prevention strategies and sustainable prevention infrastructures. 

SPF-PFS grant funds must be used primarily to support infrastructure development. It is designed to build upon the experience and established SPF-based prevention infrastructure of states/tribes to address national substance abuse prevention priorities in communities of high need. 

Grantees and their subrecipient communities must use the SPF to identify and select comprehensive, data-driven substance abuse prevention strategies to continue to accomplish the following goals:

  • prevent the onset and reduce the progression of substance misuse;
  • reduce substance misuse-related problems;
  • strengthen prevention capacity/infrastructure at the state, tribal, and community levels; and
  • leverage state/tribal-wide funding streams and resources for prevention.

LINK to RFP: https://saeandassociates.com/current-rfps/#samhsa-soc-expansion-and-sustainability