Below are recent RFPs and funding opportunities.  Please click on any of the titles to find the details of the funding application.  For recent news in the field, please click here.

If you are interested in applying for a federal grant, and seek assistance in writing an innovative and competitive narrative, consider using SAE to help develop the narrative of your application. Also, an important notice that all applicants must have updated DUNS number and SAM registration when applying through Grants.gov. If this process is new to you, please start it immediately, as it can take up to two weeks to obtain each of these. For instructions on how to obtain a DUNS number and SAM registration, go to grants.gov's Organization Registration page.


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Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
Jobs-Plus Pilot Initiative


DEADLINE: Applications due: November 17, 2017.

AWARD: Total amount available under this NOFA is $15,000,000 with awards between $1,000,000 and $3,700,000.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: Five awards.

ELIGIBILITY: Eligible applicants are Public Housing Authorities (PHAs) that operate one or more public housing developments that meet the criteria outlined in this NOFA. A list of developments that meet the criteria is provided in Appendix B, however, the mere appearance of a development on this list does not mean that the development is appropriate for a Jobs Plus program.

  • PHAs that received a Jobs Plus program grant in 2014, 2015 or 2016 are not eligible for 2017 grant funds.
  • Federally designated tribes and tribally designated housing entities are not eligible entities under this award.
  • Successful applicants will be required to implement the full 48-month term of the grant at the public housing site(s) for which funds were awarded.
  • Successful applicants will be required to inform HUD of any planned Rental Assistance Demonstration (RAD) conversions at the Jobs Plus site. RAD Conversion of Jobs Plus sites will be permitted if the planned conversion will take place post award.
  • Jobs Plus grantees that convert Jobs Plus target project(s) to PBV or PBRA through RAD will be able to finish out their Jobs Plus period of performance unless significant relocation and/or change in building occupancy is planned.
  • If either is planned at the Jobs Plus target project(s), HUD may allow for a modification of the Jobs Plus work plan or may, at the Secretary’s discretion, choose to end the Jobs Plus program at that project.
TARGET POPULATION: Criteria for Eligible Developments
  • Size: Minimum development size of 200 non-elderly-only households. Non-elderly-only means households where at least one resident is under age 62.
  • Unemployment: At least 40 percent of the households (excluding elderly-only households) that report no earned income in PIC.
  • Place: Units to be served must be contiguous unless good cause can be shown that the program will succeed in non-contiguous developments. A description how the program will be run from one central location and remain accessible to residents of non-contiguous developments will be required. This requirement may disqualify developments on the Eligible Development list if the Asset Management Project (AMP) is for scattered sites.
  • Performance: Developments that belong to a non-performing PHA may be eligible to participate provided HUD has determined the PHA can implement and oversee the grant successfully. A non-performing PHA is defined as a PHA designated as a troubled performer under the Public Housing Assessment System (PHAS) as listed on HUD’s most recent official Troubled List or is designated a substandard performer based on its most recent published PHAS score.
PHAs that have more than one development already listed as eligible in Appendix B may apply to serve more than one of the eligible developments if they are contiguous or show in the application that they meet the required criteria for place. No Request for Review of Eligibility is required prior to submitting the application.

PHAs with developments not listed on Appendix B that they believe, when combined, meet the criteria, may submit a request for review of eligibility.

PHAs may propose to combine two or more developments to meet the criteria for eligible developments, subject to these conditions: Parts of developments cannot be combined. Only entire developments may be combined. The combined developments must meet the criteria for size. The combined developments must meet the criteria for unemployment. Individuals, foreign entities, and sole proprietorship organizations are not eligible to compete for, or receive, awards made under this announcement.

SUMMARY: The purpose of the Jobs Plus Pilot program is to develop locally-based, job-driven approaches to increase earnings and advance employment outcomes through work readiness, employer linkages, job placement, educational advancement, technology skills, and financial literacy for residents of public housing. The place-based Jobs Plus Pilot program addresses poverty among public housing residents by incentivizing and enabling employment through earned income disregards for working families, and a set of services designed to support work including employer linkages, job placement and counseling, educational advancement, and financial counseling. Ideally, these incentives will saturate the target developments, building a culture of work and making working families the norm.

The Jobs Plus Pilot program consists of the following three core components:
  • Employment-Related Services
  • Financial Incentives - Jobs Plus Earned Income Disregard (JPEID)
  • Community Supports for Work
Applicants are encouraged to develop key partnerships to connect participants with any other needed services to remove barriers to work. An Individualized Training and Services Plan (ITSP) should be developed for each participant to establish goals and service strategies, and to track progress.

Employment-Related Services
Successful applicants must partner with the Department of Labor Workforce Investment Board (WIB) and American Job Center (AJC)/One-Stop in their area to offer multiple employment-related services for residents with a range of employment needs. Local Labor Market Information (LMI) should be used both for initial planning and analysis of which employment opportunities are most available locally, as well as for monitoring ongoing trends.

Program services provided on-site should include, but need not be limited to, the following:
  • Career exploration/job readiness workshops Job search and job placement assistance
  • Work experience including on-the-job training, internships, pre-apprenticeships and
  • Registered Apprenticeships (HUD encourages opportunities for residents to be paid while training whenever possible)
  • Facilitated connections to education and training opportunities
  • Rapid re-employment assistance in the event of job loss
  • Proactive post-placement job retention support and career advancement coaching
  • Access to computers, phones, fax, and copy machines and other supplies, for participants’ employment-related uses as well as adequate training on how to use these technologies
To facilitate these employment services, applicants may consider having dedicated, on-site, workforce system staff to perform job developer and case manager functions. Job developers work directly with the business community to identify and create employment opportunities and act as liaisons with local employment agencies. Case managers work one-on-one with participants to guide them through the employment process and help them achieve employment-related goals.

Financial Incentives - Jobs Plus Earned Income Disregard (JPEID)
Successful applicants must also implement a financial incentive to program participants, known as the Jobs Plus Earned Income Disregard (JPEID). This component will neutralize any rent increase due to rising income for Jobs Plus participants, removing a major disincentive to employment. Rent incentives offered through JPEID will be reimbursed to the PHA via Jobs Plus appropriations, and should be included in the program budget. Any other compensation to the PHA for lost rent revenues, such as by the standard EID calculation in the Operating Fund, will be offset manually to prevent overpayment of HUD funds to grant recipients. Further guidance will be available at the time of the award. All residents in a Jobs Plus development are eligible to receive the JPEID benefit, but in order to access JPEID they must sign up for the Jobs Plus program even if they do not actively participate in other Jobs Plus Activities. Residents who previously used up some or all of their lifetime EID eligibility are eligible to receive the full JPEID benefit.

Disregarded Amount. The JPEID excludes from the Family Rent calculation 100 percent of incremental earned income for the entire period of the Jobs Plus program. Calculation of the JPEID. Once the JPEID is triggered for a family, their baseline income will not change for the duration of the term of the grant (so participants who enroll early may benefit from the JPEID longer than residents who enroll later.) To facilitate reimbursements for rent revenue losses due to the JPEID, grantees must calculate and document each participant’s Family Rent both before and after the inclusion of any incremental earned income. The difference between these two rents is the amount to be reimbursed to the PHA through JPEID. These calculations must be provided to HUD when drawing reimbursement funds. As with any government benefit, an increase in earned income may result in the reduction or loss of other benefits that an individual was previously receiving. Grantees, through case management or other means, must be prepared to help residents understand the overall financial impact of an increase in earned income and the JPEID. It is also expected that grantees will encourage participants to take advantage of other financial work incentives they may be entitled to, such as the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC).

Community Supports for Work
Successful applicants will incorporate a robust engagement strategy for involving the residents in the targeted development and creating a working community. Engagement is more than signing up - sustained involvement in the program leading to residents' ownership of their own growth and experiences, as well as that of peers, will yield continued benefits for both participants and future residents of the development beyond the grant period. Program outreach should be directed towards residents at all points along the employment spectrum - from unemployed individuals with no work history to working underemployed families with substantial work history. Unless an application specifies that the applicant will target a limited sub-group, the application narrative should include strategies to target this wide range of potential participants, as well as strategies for retention.

One key strategy for retention should include the use of residents as Community Coaches. Community Coaches can market the various aspects of the Jobs Plus program, disseminate information about job opportunities and programs via resident social networks in the development, mentor specific individuals or groups who enroll in Jobs Plus, and help shape program offerings and outreach efforts based on their intimate knowledge of the needs and strengths of the community.

Partnerships with Local Agencies
The comprehensive nature of the Jobs Plus Pilot model requires that PHAs establish partnerships with American Job Centers and other key social service agencies within the community. HUD and DOL have developed a toolkit and webinar which describes effective strategies for establishing partnerships between PHAs and WIBs/AJCs (see “From the Ground Up: Creating Partnerships between Public Housing Authorities and Workforce Investment Boards” at (http://portal.hud.gov/hudportal/documents/huddoc?id=14_dol_publication.pdf) The toolkit provides several models for partnership that prospective applicants may want to consider.

These partnerships will serve to strengthen program planning and implementation, as well as streamline access to services for participants. For each partner identified, applicants must describe the role of the partner agency and a description of the services to be provided by the partner agency, as well as the amount of grant funding (if any) that partners will receive. Applicants should demonstrate their ability to build collaboration among all partners, regardless of whether a partner will be receiving grant funding for their services, or if the services will be provided in-kind. Partners should include:
  • Workforce Investment Boards/American Job Centers Local welfare agencies
  • Employment and training organizations
  • Vocational training providers
  • Community colleges and four-year educational institutions
  • Other supportive service agencies providing either direct services or referrals to services that are critical for supporting successful employment
In addition to employment, training and educational supports, grantees will have the flexibility to provide other supportive services based on resident needs and local capacity. HUD expects that all services that are generally available to residents of the community will be leveraged in-kind from partners. Grant funds should only be used to procure services that are not already available (either by service type or amount). Examples of the types of services that may be provided by grant funds, formal partners or the program’s referral network include but are not limited to the following:
  • Child care services and/or after school programs
  • Transportation assistance
  • Financial literacy workshops
  • Legal services (e.g. expungement)
  • Domestic violence prevention services
  • Services for formerly incarcerated/returning citizens
  • Life Skills
  • Other applicable local business support
LINK to RFP: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html, FR-6100-N-14.

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Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
Resident Opportunity & Self-Sufficiency Program


DEADLINE: Applications Due: October 23, 2017.

AWARD: $35,000,000 is available through this NOFA. The length of the project period is 3 years.

All applicants must have a minimum of 50 units to be eligible for ROSS-SC funding.

Number of PHA/tribe/TDHE Units: Max # of SCs: Max Grant*
50-1,000: 1: $246,000 per project
1,001-2,500: 2: $492,000 per project
2,501 or more: 3: $738,000 per project

NUMBER OF AWARDS: HUD expects to make approximately 110 awards from the fund available under this NOFA.

ELIGIBILITY: The following entities are eligible to apply for FY17 ROSS-SC Funding:

  • Native American tribal governments (federally recognized)
  • Indian Housing Authorities/ Tribally Designated Housing Entities (TDHEs)
  • Public Housing Agencies (PHAs)
  • Nonprofits, including Resident Associations (RAs), having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS or locally incorporated without 501(c)(3) status, other than institutions of higher education
TARGET POPULATION: Residents of Public and Indian housing.

SUMMARY: The Resident Opportunity & Self Sufficiency Service Coordinator (ROSS-SC) program is designed to assist residents of Public and Indian housing make progress towards economic and housing self-sufficiency. To accomplish this goal, ROSS provides grant funding to eligible applicants to hire Service Coordinators to assess the needs of Public and Indian housing residents and link them to supportive services that enable participants to increase earned income, reduce or eliminate the need for welfare assistance, and make progress toward achieving economic independence and housing self-sufficiency. In the case of elderly/disabled residents, the Service Coordinator links participants to supportive services which enable them to age/remain in-place thereby avoiding more costly forms of care.

This program works to promote the development of local strategies to coordinate the use of assistance under the Public Housing program with public and private resources, for supportive services and resident empowerment activities. ROSS-SC funds may be used for coordinator’s salary and fringe benefits, traveling and training expenses, and administrative costs.

The role of each ROSS-SC shall be designed to meet the needs of the local community he/she will serve; however, below is a listing of recommended functions for a ROSS-SC:
  • Coordination: The ROSS-SC must build partnerships with local service providers and work with the local Program Coordinating Committee (PCC) and with local service providers to ensure that program participants are linked to supportive services. ROSS-SC may also coordinate educational and/or community events that help residents become more self-sufficient. Grantees are encouraged to work with other organizations or internal staff to improve access to service delivery and decrease chances of duplication of services for residents.
  • Case Management: Provide general case management to residents which includes intake, assessment, education, and referral of residents to service providers in the local community.
  • Outreach: Grantees are encouraged to outreach to all residents in developments they are serving which includes single parent heads of household, elderly, person(s) with disabilities, formerly incarcerated persons, and transition age youth.
  • Evaluation: Grantees must evaluate the success of the program by using a reporting tool as directed by HUD.
LINK to RFP: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html, FR-6100-N-05

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Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
Choice Neighborhoods Implementation Grant Program


DEADLINE: Applications Due: November 22, 2017.

AWARD: $132,000,000 is available through this NOFA with a maximum amount of either development cost for the replacement housing units to be developed in the Transformation Plan and allow for additional funding to cover non-housing activities or $30,000,000 per budget period. Project funds must be fully expended by September 30, 2024.

Matching funds in the amount of at least five percent of the requested grant amount in cash or in-kind donations must be secured and used by the end of the grant term.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: HUD expects to make approximately 5 awards from the funds available under this NOFA.

ELIGIBILITY: The Lead Applicant must be a Public Housing Agency (PHA), a local government, or a tribal entity. If there is also a Co-Applicant, it must be a PHA, a local government, a tribal entity, a nonprofit, or a for-profit developer. The local government of jurisdiction, or tribe for applications that target Indian Housing, must be the Lead Applicant or Co-Applicant.

TARGET POPULATION: Each application must focus on the revitalization of at least one severely distressed public and/or assisted housing project. The definition of severely distressed housing from section 24(j)(2) of the 1937 Act is included in section I.A.3 along with definitions of "public housing" and "assisted housing". You must demonstrate in your application that the targeted housing is eligible under this NOFA (i.e. is public and/or assisted housing) and meets the definition of severely distressed.

Eligible neighborhoods for Choice Neighborhoods grant funds are neighborhoods:

  1. With at least 20 percent of the residents estimated to be in poverty or have extremely low incomes based on the most recent data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau; and
  2. That are experiencing distress related to one or both of the following:
    1. high crime; defined as where either the average Part I violent crime rate (measured as Part I Violent Crimes per 1000 persons) over the three years 2014-2016 is at least 1.5 times the per capita Part I violent crime rate (measured as Part I Violent Crimes per 1000 persons) of the city or, where no city data is available, county/parish in which the neighborhood is located over the same time frame; or the average annual rate is greater than 18 crimes per 1000 persons; OR
    2. high vacancy, or for applications targeting Indian Housing, substandard homes; defined as where either the most current rate within the last year of long-term vacant or substandard homes is at least 1.5 times higher than that of the county/parish; or the rate is greater than 4 percent.
SUMMARY: The Choice Neighborhoods program leverages significant public and private dollars to support locally driven strategies that address struggling neighborhoods with distressed public or HUD-assisted housing through a comprehensive approach to neighborhood transformation. Local leaders, residents, and stakeholders, such as public housing authorities, cities, schools, police, business owners, nonprofits, and private developers, come together to create and implement a plan that revitalizes distressed HUD housing and addresses the challenges in the surrounding neighborhood. The program helps communities transform neighborhoods by revitalizing severely distressed public and/or assisted housing and catalyzing critical improvements in the neighborhood, including vacant property, housing, businesses, services and schools. To this end, Choice Neighborhoods is focused on three core goals:
  1. Housing: Replace distressed public and assisted housing with high-quality mixed-income housing that is well-managed and responsive to the needs of the surrounding neighborhood;
  2. People: Improve outcomes of households living in the target housing related to employment and income, health, and children’s education; and
  3. Neighborhood: Create the conditions necessary for public and private reinvestment in distressed neighborhoods to offer the kinds of amenities and assets, including safety, good schools, and commercial activity, that are important to families’ choices about their community.
To achieve these core goals, successful applicants have in place a comprehensive neighborhood revitalization strategy, or “Transformation Plan.” This Transformation Plan is the guiding document for the revitalization of the public and/or assisted housing units, while simultaneously directing the transformation of the surrounding neighborhood and creating positive outcomes for families.

Experience shows that to successfully develop and implement the Transformation Plan, broad civic engagement is needed. Successful applicants need to work with public and private agencies, organizations (including philanthropic and civic organizations), and individuals - including local leaders, residents, and stakeholders, such as public housing authorities, cities, Tribes, schools, police, business owners, nonprofits, and private developers - to gather and leverage the financial and human capital resources needed to support the sustainability of the plan. These efforts should build community support for and involvement in the development and implementation of the plan.

Objectives and Metrics to Measure Long Term Success: Each Choice Neighborhoods grantee is expected to develop metrics based on the objectives listed below in order to measure performance.
  1. Housing Objectives: Housing transformed with the assistance of Choice Neighborhoods should be:
    1. Well-Managed and Financially Viable. Developments that have budgeted appropriately for the rental income that can be generated from the project and meet or exceed industry standards for quality management and maintenance of the property.
    2. Mixed-Income. Housing affordable to families and individuals with a broad range of incomes including low-income, moderate-income, and market rate or unrestricted.
    3. Energy Efficient, Sustainable, Accessible, Healthy, and Free from Discrimination. Housing that is well-designed, embraces not only the requirements of accessible design but also concepts of visitability and universal design, has low per unit energy and water consumption and healthy indoor air quality, is built to be resistant to local disaster risk, has affordable broadband Internet access, and is free from all types of discrimination.
  2. People Objectives: People that live in the neighborhood, with a primary focus on residents of the housing targeted for revitalization, benefit from:
    1. Effective Education. A high level of resident access to high-quality early learning programs and services so children enter kindergarten ready to learn and significant growth in existing individual resident educational outcomes over time relative to the state average.
    2. Employment Opportunities. The income of residents of the target housing development, particularly wage income for non-elderly/non-disabled adult residents, increases over time.
    3. Quality Health Care. Residents have increased access to health services and have improved health over time.
    4. Housing Location, Quality, and Affordability. Residents who, by their own choice, do not return to the development have housing and neighborhood opportunities as good as or better than the opportunities available to those who occupy the redeveloped site.
  3. Neighborhood Objectives: Through investments catalyzed by Choice Neighborhoods, the neighborhood enjoys improved:
    1. Private and Public Investment in the Neighborhood. The neighboring housing has a very low vacancy/abandonment rate, the housing inventory is of high quality, and the neighborhood is mixed income and maintains a mixture of incomes over time.
    2. Amenities. The distance traveled from the neighborhood to basic services is equal to or less than the distance traveled from the median neighborhood in the metropolitan area. Those basic services include grocery stores, banks, health clinics and doctors’ offices, dentist offices, and high quality early learning programs and services.
    3. Effective Public Schools: Public schools in the target neighborhood are safe and welcoming places for children and their families. In addition, schools have test scores that are as good as or better than the state average or are implementing school reforms that raise student achievement over time and graduate students from high school prepared for college and a career.
    4. Safety: Residents are living in a safer environment as evidenced by the revitalized neighborhood having significantly lower crime rates than the neighborhood had prior to redevelopment and maintaining a lower crime rate over time.
Changes from Previous NOFA.
Highlights of significant changes:
  • In the conference report related to the FY2017 Appropriations, Congress directed HUD to give priority consideration to prior Planning Grantees for making Implementation Grant awards. Accordingly, this NOFA:
    • states that prior Planning Grantees for which HUD has accepted the final Transformation Plan automatically pass the Consistency with the PHA/MTW Plan, Consistency with the Consolidated Plan, and Resident Involvement threshold requirements and receive full points for the Planning Process rating factor.
    • for Planning Grantees currently developing their Transformation Plan, the maximum amount for which they can apply under this NOFA is not decreased by the amount of the Planning Grant award.
  • Deleted several rating factors to streamline the application process. Some factors, such as Long-term Affordability and Green Building, are now Program Requirements that apply to all grantees since all prior applicants made these commitments and earned full points.
  • Revised criteria to qualify for the exception to the hard-unit one-for-one replacement requirement in order to streamline the approval process. Applicants must only meet two criteria and the data for both criteria are provided in the report generated by the CN Mapping Tool. Applicants no longer need to submit additional documentation to HUD for review and approval prior to submission of the grant application.
  • Adjusted the point values in the rating factors to conform with the Departmental standard that the total points for each NOFA is 100 points, plus preference points.
  • Reorganized content to conform with HUD's current standard template. The most notable change is that all leverage rating factors are now in a single Leverage rating factor category and the program requirements related to Leverage are in that section (V.A.1.D).
LINK to RFP: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html, FR-6100-N-34

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Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
Community Compass Technical Assistance and Capacity Building Program


DEADLINE: Applications Due: September 28, 2017.

AWARD: 56,000,000 is available through this NOFA with awards between $250,000 and $20 million per project period.

  1. Departmental TA: Up to $26 million - This includes up to $7,000,000 for programs and initiatives under the Office of Community Planning and Development; up to $8,550,000 for programs and initiatives under the Office of Public and Indian Housing; up to $2,850,000 for programs and initiatives under the Office of Housing; up to $6,600,000 for cross-program requirements, programs, and initiatives; and up to $1,000,000 for CDBG local income surveys TA and pilot testing.
  2. McKinney-Vento TA: $15 million.
  3. National Homeless Data Analysis Project TA (formerly HMIS TA): $7 million
  4. Public Housing Administrative Receivership and Recovery (PHA Recovery) TA: $1 million
  5. NAHASDA TA: $3.5 million - A minimum of $3.5 million for national or regional organizations representing Native American housing interests; this $3.5 million includes $2 million for a national organization as authorized under section 703 of NAHASDA
  6. Native American Housing and Community Development TA: $3.5 million - $3.5 million open to all other eligible applicants
NUMBER OF AWARDS: HUD expects to make approximately 20 awards from the funds available under this NOFA. This figure may change based on the total funding available.

ELIGIBILITY: The following entities are eligible:
  • State, county, city, township and special district governments
  • Private, Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
  • Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
  • Nonprofits with or without a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS
  • For profit organizations , including Small Businesses
  • NAHASDA-eligible Indian tribes as defined at Section 4(13) of NAHASDA; tribally-designated housing entities (TDHEs) as defined at Section 4(22) of the NAHASDA; and national or regional organizations representing Native American housing interests
  • Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs), Councils of Government (COGs), or other regional planning entities
TARGET POPULATION: HUD customers.

SUMMARY: Community Compass is designed to help HUD’s customers navigate complex housing and community development challenges by equipping them with the knowledge, skills, tools, capacity, and systems to implement HUD programs and policies successfully and provide effective administrative and managerial oversight of HUD funding. The goal of Community Compass is to empower communities by providing effective technical assistance and capacity building so that successful program implementation is sustained.

HUD recognizes that its customers often interact with a variety of HUD programs as they deliver housing or community development services. Community Compass brings together technical assistance investments from across HUD program offices, including the offices of Community Planning and Development, Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity, Housing, and Public and Indian Housing. This cross-funding approach allows technical assistance to address the needs of grantees and subgrantees across multiple HUD programs, often within the same engagement, as well as address cross-agency issues. Applicants are encouraged to procure subcontractors and consultants to demonstrate expertise across a wide variety of HUD programs, as well as in specific skill and policy areas. Community Compass is centrally managed by HUD Headquarters with involvement of the HUD Regional, Field, and Area Offices.

TA Focus Area: HUD expects to focus its technical assistance (TA) efforts and available funding on the topics listed for each category in the table below. HUD recognizes that overlap often occurs among these categories, programs, and topics. Applicants are encouraged to establish their experience working across categories, as applicable.
  • Affordable Housing, Mixed Financed Development, and Homeownership
  • Community and Economic Development, Disaster Resilience
  • Homelessness
  • National Homeless Data Analysis Project
  • Public Housing Operations and Programs
  • Native American Housing and Community Development
  • Supportive Housing and Services
  • Policy Development and Research
  • Fair Housing, Energy and Environment, Relocation, and Other Cross-Cutting Requirement
In order to assist HUD grantees, subrecipients, or other HUD customers, successful applicants may be tasked to deliver TA using any of the following eligible activities. The eligible activities described below are subject to any restrictions or limitations imposed by the source of funding. For example, McKinney-Vento TA is subject to the requirements at Section 405 of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11361b.) and 24 CFR 578.101. As another example, direct TA for PHA Recovery and Sustainability and related activities is to be used for public housing under the United States Housing Act of 1937 (not Section 8).
  1. Needs Assessments. Needs assessments of customers will determine the nature and scope of technical assistance and capacity building needed. In some instances, self-assessment by the customer or a Field Office assessment may provide a satisfactory basis for determining the scope and scale of technical and capacity building assistance. In other cases, successful applicants will conduct on-site or remote needs assessments to collect information about the capacity gaps of the identified customer. The needs assessment may involve the use of multiple types of information collection and analysis, such as the Consolidated Plan, Public Housing Annual Plan, Indian Housing Plan, Tribal Performance Assessments, Public Housing and Housing Choice Voucher Assessments, Assessment of Fair Housing (AFH), Point-In-Time Counts of the homeless, HMIS data, Continuum of Care application information, HUD monitoring results, energy audits, annual financial audits, funds obligation and expenditures, and CPD maps. Needs assessments may also assist customers with quantifying the impact of affordable housing and community and economic development initiatives and identifying local market conditions so that program resources may be better targeted and leveraged.
  2. Direct TA and Capacity Building Engagements. Successful applicants may be tasked TA for multiple HUD programs, multiple issue areas, and/or a single program or issue area. Direct TA includes PHA Recovery and Sustainability and related activities that will proactively address “at risk” areas of performance, and successful applicants may be tasked with assisting HUD or its administrative and judicial receivers to build capacity to improve PHA operations and performance long term. Direct TA may also include: Assistance with maximizing the investment of other Federal and local funds in conjunction with HUD funds; peer-to-peer networking, as is currently provided under the National Resource Network model; furthering innovative practices; assisting newly-designated MTW PHAs with the transition to MTW; training for AmeriCorps VISTA members; or building the capacity of grantees or PHAs to complete an Assessment of Fair Housing (AFH). Direct TA also includes the operation of one or more virtual help desks and addressing questions and issues raised by HUD’s customers.
  3. Develop and Maintain Tools and Products. Tools and products developed will use adult learning principles to assist HUD customers with understanding existing, revised, or new complex program statutes and regulations, as well as the other Federal requirements (e.g., Davis-Bacon wage rates, Section 3, civil rights compliance, environmental justice and environmental standards, and accessibility for persons with disabilities) that often apply to these programs. HUD is increasingly employing virtual training and technical assistance as a cost-effective way to reach diverse audiences and address the constantly changing needs of customers and program requirements. These products might take the form of web-based courses or trainings, videos, interactive tools, and webinars. Tool and product development may also include the creation of templates, desk guides, tool kits, and curricula that improve program management and operations, evaluation, and performance measurement. Where appropriate, HUD program and other Federal requirements, such as affirmatively furthering fair housing, will be integrated into comprehensive products that will serve the technical assistance needs of a broad range of program partners. All products and tools developed will comply with Section 508 accessibility requirements.
  4. Self-Directed and Group Learning. Self-directed and group learning is intended to increase capacity and close competency gaps of participants by equipping them with the necessary program knowledge and skill sets needed to administer and manage HUD programs. Group learning will incorporate adult learning principles that may include delivery of HUD-approved training courses remotely or in person, online self-directed courses, problem-solving clinics, policy academies, live or pre-recorded webinars, curricula, and peer-to-peer assistance exchanges for customers with similar local market contexts, challenges, opportunities, and community needs. Group learning could include establishing and supporting group learning cohorts and curricula.
  5. Knowledge Management. Knowledge management includes the development, operation, maintenance, and/or hosting of websites to support the technical assistance, capacity building, and training needs of a diverse set of HUD’s urban, rural, and tribal customers. Knowledge management may include integrated learning or curriculum management systems; databases of resources, tools, and information; development of interactive tools to assist with program design and management and learning cohort formation; collecting and providing information on HUD grantees and subgrantees, including awards, expenditures, action plans, environmental reviews, and individual projects and activities; tracking technical assistance engagements with particular recipients or cohorts of recipients, and their effectiveness; and developing new resources.
  6. Data analysis, reporting, and performance measurement. This activity includes technical assistance and training that help customers with analyzing data and understanding data trends; using data to inform and revise plans and strategies; using performance measurement and reporting tools; creating data-sharing partnerships and agreements; and collecting and reporting accurate and valid data regarding programs, activities, and beneficiaries.
  7. NAHASDA Allocation Formula Administration and Negotiated Rulemaking and Consultation Support. Support for administration of the Indian Housing Block Grant Allocation Formula and related formula negotiated rulemaking as eligible TA activities under Native American Housing and Community Development TA includes administration of the allocation formula, assistance with formula determinations, census challenges, notification letters, data correction and reports, as well as consultation assistance to the Department for all negotiated rulemaking with Indian tribes and any other required tribal consultation.
LINK to RFP: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html, FR-6100-N-06

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Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP) Emergency Relief Funds (ERF)


DEADLINE: Applications due: November 13, 2017.

AWARD: Total annual funding available: $65,000,000 with awards of up to $11,000,000 for one year.

NUMBER OF AWARDS:Up to 35 awards.

ELIGIBILITY: Eligible applicants are limited to RWHAP Part B states/territories that reported to HRSA a new ADAP waiting list or who have used the ADAP ERF funds to prevent, reduce, or eliminate an ADAP waiting list between January 2011 and August 2017.

States/territories that did not report to HRSA a new ADAP waiting list or use the ADAP ERF funds to prevent, reduce, or eliminate an ADAP waiting list between January 2011 and August 2017 are not eligible to apply.

TARGET POPULATION: People on an ADAP waiting list.

SUMMARY: The purpose of this program is to provide funding to states/territories to prevent, reduce, or eliminate ADAP waiting lists, including through cost-containment measures. These funds are to be used in conjunction with the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program’s (RWHAP) Part B ADAP administered by the HRSA HAB Division of State HIV/AIDS Programs (DSHAP).

HRSA will base ADAP ERF awards upon applicants’ ability to successfully demonstrate need for additional funding. An external objective review committee (ORC) will evaluate this need based on criteria published in this notice of funding opportunity (NOFO), with priority given to addressing existing waiting lists.

Recipients should take action to align their organization’s efforts, within the parameters of the RWHAP statute and program guidance, around the following areas of critical focus:

  1. Widespread testing and linkage to care, enabling PLWH to access treatment early;
  2. Broad support for PLWH to remain engaged in comprehensive care, including support for treatment adherence; and
  3. Universal viral suppression among PLWH.
LINK to RFP: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html, FOA#: HRSA-18-059.

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Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
Service Area Competition HRSA-18-026


DEADLINE: Application Due Date in Grants.gov: November 6, 2017
Supplemental Information Due Date in HRSA EHB: November 28, 2017

AWARD: Total annual funding available for this program: approximately $214.5 million for up to three years. Individual awards vary. Please see the SAAT table for more information: https://bphc.hrsa.gov/sac/.

NUMBER OF AWARDS:Up to 81 grants.

ELIGIBILITY: Public or nonprofit private entities, including tribal, faith-based, or community-based organizations.

TARGET POPULATION: Underserved communities and vulnerable populations.

SUMMARY: The purpose of this grant program is to improve the health of the Nation’s underserved communities and vulnerable populations by assuring continued access to affordable, quality primary health care services. The Health Center Program supports public and private nonprofit community-based and patient-directed organizations that provide primary health care services to the Nation’s medically underserved. The purpose of the SAC NOFO is to ensure continued access to affordable, quality primary health care services for communities and vulnerable populations currently served by the Health Center Program.

Your application must document an understanding of the need for primary health care services in the service area and propose a comprehensive plan to meet this need. The plan must ensure the availability and accessibility of primary health care services to all individuals in the service area and target population, regardless of ability to pay. You must further demonstrate that your plan includes collaborative and coordinated delivery systems for the provision of health care to the underserved. Your application must demonstrate compliance with applicable Health Center Program requirements and corresponding regulations and policies.

In addition to the Health Center Program requirements, specific requirements for applicants requesting funding under each health center type are outlined below.

Community Health Center (CHC) Applicants:

  • Provide a plan that ensures the availability and accessibility of required primary and preventive health care services to underserved populations in the service area.
Migrant Health Center (MHC) Applicants:
  • Provide a plan that ensures the availability and accessibility of required primary and preventive health care services to migratory and seasonal agricultural workers and their families in the service area.
  • Migratory agricultural workers are individuals principally employed in agriculture and who establish temporary housing for the purpose of this work, including those individuals who have had such work as their principal employment within 24 months as well as their dependent family members. Agricultural workers who leave a community to work elsewhere are classified as migratory workers in both communities. Aged and disabled former agricultural workers should also be included in this group.
  • Seasonal agricultural workers are individuals employed in agriculture on a seasonal basis who do not establish a temporary home for purposes of employment, including their family members.
Health Care for the Homeless (HCH) Applicants:
  • Provide a plan that ensures the availability and accessibility of required primary and preventive health care services to people experiencing homelessness, defined as patients who lack housing, including residents of permanent supportive housing, transitional housing, or other housing programs that are targeted to homeless populations, in the service area. This plan may also allow for the continuation of services for up to 12 months to individuals no longer homeless as a result of becoming a resident of permanent housing.
  • Provide substance abuse services.
Public Housing Primary Care Applicants:
  • Provide a plan that ensures the availability and accessibility of required primary and preventive health care services to residents of public housing and individuals living in areas immediately accessible to public housing. Public housing means public housing agency-developed, owned, or assisted low-income housing, including mixed finance projects. It does not mean public housing that is only subsidized through Section 8 housing vouchers.
  • Consult with residents of the proposed public housing sites regarding the planning and administration of the program.
LINK to RFP: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html, FOA#: HRSA-18-026

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Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
Service Area Competition HRSA-18-025


DEADLINE: Application Due Date in Grants.gov: October 10, 2017.
Supplemental Information Due Date in HRSA EHB: October 25, 2017.

AWARD: Anticipated total annual funding of approximately $244 million for up to three years. Individual awards vary. Please see the SAAT table for more information: https://bphc.hrsa.gov/sac/.

NUMBER OF AWARDS:Up to 59 grants.

ELIGIBILITY: Public or nonprofit private entities, including tribal, faith-based, or community-based organizations.

TARGET POPULATION: Underserved communities and vulnerable populations.

SUMMARY: The Health Center Program supports public and private nonprofit community-based and patient-directed organizations that provide primary health care services to the Nation’s medically underserved. The purpose of the SAC NOFO is to ensure continued access to affordable, quality primary health care services for communities and vulnerable populations currently served by the Health Center Program.

Your application must document an understanding of the need for primary health care services in the service area and propose a comprehensive plan to meet this need. The plan must ensure the availability and accessibility of primary health care services to all individuals in the service area and target population, regardless of ability to pay. You must further demonstrate that your plan includes collaborative and coordinated delivery systems for the provision of health care to the underserved. Your application must demonstrate compliance with applicable Health Center Program requirements and corresponding regulations and policies.

In addition to the Health Center Program requirements, specific requirements for applicants requesting funding under each health center type are outlined below.

Community Health Center (CHC) Applicants:

  • Provide a plan that ensures the availability and accessibility of required primary and preventive health care services to underserved populations in the service area.
Migrant Health Center (MHC) Applicants:
  • Provide a plan that ensures the availability and accessibility of required primary and preventive health care services to migratory and seasonal agricultural workers and their families in the service area.
    • Migratory agricultural workers are individuals principally employed in agriculture and who establish temporary housing for the purpose of this work, including those individuals who have had such work as their principal employment within 24 months as well as their dependent family members. Agricultural workers who leave a community to work elsewhere are classified as migratory workers in both communities. Aged and disabled former agricultural workers should also be included in this group.
    • Seasonal agricultural workers are individuals employed in agriculture on a seasonal basis who do not establish a temporary home for purposes of employment, including their family members.
Health Care for the Homeless (HCH) Applicants:
  • Provide a plan that ensures the availability and accessibility of required primary and preventive health care services to people experiencing homelessness, defined as patients who lack housing, including residents of permanent supportive housing, transitional housing, or other housing programs that are targeted to homeless populations, in the service area. This plan may also allow for the continuation of services for up to 12 months to individuals no longer homeless as a result of becoming a resident of permanent housing.
  • Provide substance abuse services.
Public Housing Primary Care Applicants:
  • Provide a plan that ensures the availability and accessibility of required primary and preventive health care services to residents of public housing and individuals living in areas immediately accessible to public housing. Public housing means public housing agency-developed, owned, or assisted low-income housing, including mixed finance projects. It does not mean public housing that is only subsidized through Section 8 housing vouchers.
  • Consult with residents of the proposed public housing sites regarding the planning and administration of the program.
LINK to RFP: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html, FOA#: HRSA-18-025

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New York City Department of Youth and Community Development (DYCD)
Runaway and Homeless Youth Services (Open-Ended)


DEADLINE: Open-Ended.

AWARD: Available in RFP. Number of awards not mentioned in concept paper.

ELIGIBILITY: To receive this RFP in the HHS Accelerator system, you must have an approved Service Application for at least one of the following:

  • Preventive Services
  • Case Management
  • Shelter
  • Drop-in Center
  • Homelessness Prevention
  • Housing
TARGET POPULATION: Runaway and homeless youth and their families in New York City.

SUMMARY: The New York City Department of Youth and Community Development (DYCD) invests in a network of community based organizations and programs to alleviate the effects of poverty and provide opportunities for New Yorkers and communities to flourish.

DYCD funds a range of services for Runaway and Homeless Youth that includes Drop-in Centers, Crisis Shelters, Transitional Independent Living programs, and Street Outreach and Referral Services.

DYCD’s Runaway and Homeless Youth services are designed to protect runaway and homeless youth and reunite them with their families whenever possible.

In accordance with their mission to support the City’s youth and their families by funding high quality youth and community development programs, DYCD is seeking additional beds to be operated by qualified nonprofits organizations to provide residential beds within Crisis shelters or transitional independent living facilities.

LINK to RFP: http://www1.nyc.gov/assets/hhsaccelerator/downloads/pdf/DYCDRunawayandHomelessYouthServices.pdf, RFP available to eligible applicants in HHS Accelerator

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New York City Human Resources Administration (HRA)
NY/NY III Non-Emergency Permanent Supportive Congregate Housing for Chronically Homeless Single Adults Living with AIDS or Advanced HIV Illness


DEADLINE: This is an open-ended RFP; therefore, all proposals will be accepted and reviewed on an ongoing basis until all units covered by this RFP are sited.

AWARD: HRA has determined that the maximum cost per unit will be $25,444 per year. However, HRA reserves the right to develop contracts with a lower unit cost. Contractors should seek and secure the use of non-HRA funding and in kind contributions in their overall operating budget when applicable, to maximize economies of scale. Such funding would provide an offset to the negotiated annual budget amount.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: 145 units remaining

ELIGIBILITY: Permanent non-emergency facilities would accept all referrals forwarded for each vacant unit unless the program can demonstrate to HASA that the client is not suitable for the program.

TARGET POPULATION: Chronically homeless single adults living with HIV/AIDS or advanced HIV illness.

SUMMARY: HRA is seeking appropriately qualified vendors to operate and maintain approximately 145 units remaining of permanent supportive congregate housing for chronically homeless single adults who are living with HIV/AIDS and who suffer from a co-occurring serious and persistent mental illness, a substance abuse disorder, or a Mentally Ill Chemical Abuse (MICAS) disorder.

Under these programs the proposer is expected to provide case management and support services to clients to enable all eligible clients to achieve the skills and financial independence required for independent living. In addition, the proposer is required to maximize the client’s self-reliance and capacity for independence through referrals to employment programs for training, vocational rehabilitation and job placement. The proposer is expected to work with the target population to maximize functional capacity, reduce morbidity and mortality by linking clients to health, mental health and/or substance abuse treatment services and monitoring treatment adherence/compliance.

This is an Open-Ended RFP; therefore, proposals will be accepted and reviewed on an ongoing basis until all units covered by this RFP are sited.

RFP available at: http://www1.nyc.gov/site/hra/business/request-for-proposals.page, (see Request for Proposals for Provision of Non-Emergency Permanent Supportive Congregate Housing for Chronically Homeless Single Adults Living with AIDS or Advanced HIV Illness under the NY/NY III Supportive Housing Agreement (Opened Ended).

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