Funding Opportunities

Below are recent RFPs and funding opportunities.  Please click on any of the titles to find the details of the funding application.  For recent news in the field, please click here.

If you are interested in applying for a federal grant, and seek assistance in writing an innovative and competitive narrative, consider using SAE to help develop the narrative of your application. Also, an important notice that all applicants must have updated DUNS number and SAM registration when applying through Grants.gov. If this process is new to you, please start it immediately, as it can take up to two weeks to obtain each of these. For instructions on how to obtain a DUNS number and SAM registration, go to grants.gov’s Organization Registration page.

Current Requests for Proposals

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Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA)

Second Chance Act Statewide Adult Recidivism Reduction Strategic Planning Program

DEADLINE: Applications Due: July 6, 2017.

AWARD: Awards of up to $100,000 with an estimated total of $800,000 of funding for a 12-month performance period.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: Up to eight awards.

ELIGIBILITY: Eligible applicants are limited to state correctional agencies (state departments of corrections or community corrections) or State Administering Agencies (SAAs). Agencies from states that were awarded Second Chance Act Statewide Recidivism Reduction grants in fiscal year (FY) 2015 are NOT eligible to apply. BJA welcomes applications under which two or more entities would carry out the federal award; however, only one entity may be the applicant.


TARGET POPULATION: Individuals most likely to recidivate in areas where crime and recidivism rates are the highest.

SUMMARY: Developing a reentry approach for reducing recidivism is extremely challenging for even the most sophisticated correctional agency, requiring access to data and service delivery and coordination from multiple systems, including housing, health, employment, and education.

This solicitation will provide funding for 12-month strategic planning grants during which time state-level participants will convene and work to: 1) identify the drivers of recidivism in the state, 2) identify a target population and recidivism reduction goals for the state, 3) review the alignment of existing corrections programs and practices with evidenced-based practices, and 4) develop a plan to meet recidivism reduction goals using evidenced-based practices.



Upon the completion of the Statewide Recidivism Reduction Strategic Plan, states will be invited by BJA to submit applications for implementation grants from between $1-$3 million. Future funding decisions for implementation grants will be competitive and will consider the quality and comprehensiveness of the Statewide Recidivism Reduction Strategic Plan.
The goal of the Second Chance Act Statewide Recidivism Reduction Strategic Planning Program is to assist state teams in developing strategic plans that are comprehensive, collaborative and multi-systemic. These plans address the challenges posed by reentry through various policies and/or procedural practices that are essential to a supportive and successful transition from state correctional facilities to the community, thereby reducing the state’s recidivism rate and increasing public safety.



The objectives for the Second Chance Act Statewide Adult Recidivism Reduction Strategic Planning Program are to:

  • Identify drivers (policies/practices) of recidivism in the state
  • Identify a target population and recidivism reduction goals for the state
  • Review the alignment of existing corrections programs and practices with evidence-based practices
  • Develop a strategic plan to meet statewide recidivism reduction goals using evidence-based practices.

The deliverable under this strategic planning award is a state level, comprehensive plan that addresses the state’s recidivism drivers, and includes effective strategies for reducing recidivism and enhancing public safety that incorporate the following principles:

  • Focus on the individuals most likely to recidivate;
  • Use evidenced-based programs proven to work and ensure the delivery of services is high quality;
  • Deploy supervisory policies and practices that balance sanctions and treatment; and
  • Target places where crime and recidivism rates are the highest.

Mandatory Requirements: Section 101 of the Second Chance Act outlines the following Mandatory Requirements that must be included in an application to be eligible to secure for Section 101 funding. Applicants under this solicitation must demonstrate and complete all of the following:

  1. A reentry strategic plan that describes the state’s long-term reentry strategy, including measurable annual and 5-year performance outcomes, relating to the long-term goals of increasing public safety and reducing recidivism. One goal of the plan shall be a 50 percent reduction in the rate of recidivism over a 5-year period. This goal was established in the original drafting of the Second Chance Act and applicants are urged to establish reasonable recidivism reduction goals for their state based on current conditions and drivers. Applicants should share any and all reentry strategic plans currently in place with the understanding that should a grant be awarded, states will receive intensive technical assistance to develop a comprehensive data-and research-driven plan for recidivism reduction. Specific guidance will be provided on how to set reasonable, yet achievable reduction goals during the planning process.
  2. A detailed reentry implementation schedule and sustainability plan.
  3. Documentation that reflects the establishment of, and ongoing engagement of, a Reentry Task Force comprised of relevant state, tribal, territorial, or local leaders and representatives of relevant agencies, service providers, nonprofit organizations, and other key stakeholders.
  4. Discussion of the role of state governmental agencies, nonprofit organizations, continuums of care, state or local interagency councils on homelessness, and community stakeholders that will coordinate and collaborate during the planning and implementation of the reentry strategy. The applicant will provide certification (via MOUs or other means of demonstrating commitment) of the involvement of such agencies and organizations. These partners and participants in the creation of the reentry strategy should include representatives from the fields of public safety, corrections, housing (including partnerships with public housing authorities), homeless services providers, health, education, substance abuse, children and families, victims’ services, employment, and business.
  5. Extensive evidence of collaboration between state and local government agencies overseeing health, mental health, housing, homeless services, child welfare, education, substance abuse, victims services, state child support, and employment services, and with law enforcement agencies.
  6. An extensive discussion of the role of state corrections departments, community corrections agencies, and local jail corrections systems in ensuring successful reentry of individuals into their communities.
  7. Documentation that reflects explicit support of the chief executive officer (Governor) of the applicant state, territory, or Indian tribe, and how this office will remain informed and connected to the activities of the project.
  8. A description of the evidence-based methodology and outcome measures that will be used to evaluate the program and a discussion of how such measurements will provide a valid assessment of the impact of the program. The primary objective of the Second Chance Act is to reduce recidivism. Based upon reliable research findings, there are six fundamental strategies of evidence-based correctional practice that are widely accepted as efficacious in reducing future criminal behavior. Applicants are required to clearly articulate how these evidence-based strategies are integrated into their program design, and how the program will ensure participants take part in evidence-based services and programs that occur both pre-and post-release.
  9. A description of how the project could be broadly replicated or brought to scale if demonstrated to be effective.
  10. A plan for the analysis of the statutory, regulatory, rules-based, and practice-based hurdles to reintegration of individuals into the community. BJA encourages applicants to review the National Inventory of the Collateral Consequences of Conviction, which catalogues statutes and administrative rules that contain a collateral consequence. The database, available at NICCC will assist attorneys, policymakers, and the public to more easily identify what consequences follow from particular criminal offenses.
  11. A baseline recidivism rate for the proposed target population including documentation to support the development of the rate. All grantees will be required to provide a baseline recidivism rate upon award.

Planning and Capacity Building: Successful applicants will engage in strategic planning, including the data analysis to determine the drivers of the state’s recidivism rate, a review of type and quality of existing correctional and reentry programming, review the state’s reentry and supervision policies and practices for adherence to core correctional practices and, develop a sound organizational infrastructure which should result in the desired reduction in overall recidivism.



The comprehensive strategy should include recommended changes in policy and practice, a work plan to implement those changes and build statewide support for them, and a budget associated with this work plan. In discussing this planning and capacity building phase, the applicant should address the following:

  • Provide a clear statewide definition of recidivism, an explanation of how that rate is calculated on a regular basis and reported to policymakers periodically so that changes can be routinely and effectively tracked over time, and demonstrate the capability to access and obtain data.
  • Identify a realistic, but ambitious, target for reducing recidivism within a 2-year period.
  • Demonstrate interest among leaders in state government, including the governor, state legislators, and court officials, in participating on a task force or steering committee to develop and implement a plan to realize this goal of reduced recidivism. The following questions should be addressed: (1) Who will serve on the task force or steering committee, which must include representation of key stakeholders but also be of manageable size, to ensure broad support for a specific goal in recidivism reduction? (2) Who will chair this group? (3) Who will staff it? (4) How often will they meet and over what period of time?
  • Review, within the context of the goal set, the state’s strengths and areas for improvement regarding the strategies that research has demonstrated are essential to any comprehensive effort to change criminal behavior and reduce recidivism:
    • Risk/need assessment is used to determine program/service placement, inform the release decision, set supervision conditions and reporting requirements, and inform the response to non-compliance or violation behavior.
    • Programs provided are designed to change criminal behaviors and are grounded in research; quality is reviewed using a structured quality assurance process and steps to improve program quality are taken based on the findings.
    • Effective supervision strategies are used to encourage compliance with conditions of release and to ensure effective responses when someone does not comply with those conditions of release.
  • Describe what the state will do over a 12-month planning grant period to identify what changes in policy and practice are necessary to improve in the following areas: 1) risk/needs assessment; 2) pre-release planning and service coordination; 3) program quality; and 4) effective supervision.

LINK to RFP: https://www.bja.gov/funding/SRR17.pdf

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Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA)

PREA Program: Strategic Support for PREA Implementation in Local Confinement Facilities Nationwide

DEADLINE: Applications due: May 25, 2017.

AWARD: Up to $5,000,000. BJA expects to make the award for a 36-month project period of performance, to begin on October 1, 2017.

$2,000,000 will be used by the selected provider or team of providers to deliver targeted technical assistance and training to the competitively selected project sites throughout the Planning and Implementation Phases.

$3,000,000 will be withheld during the Planning Phase. The $3,000,000 will be awarded to the selected provider or team of providers following the Planning Phase and BJA’s review and approval of the summary document that includes site-specific findings that emerge during the Planning Phase and the PREA implementation steps that the sites plan to take. The $3,000,000 will be used by the provider or team of providers to fund PREA-related activities in the project sites during the Implementation Phase.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: One award.

ELIGIBILITY: Eligible applicants are limited to any national nonprofit organization, for-profit (commercial) organization (including tribal nonprofit or for-profit organizations), or institution of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education) that have expertise and experience managing and delivering training and technical assistance on complex corrections or criminal justice issues at the national and local levels. For-profit organizations (as well as other recipients) (including tribal institutions of higher education) must forgo any profit or management fee.

BJA welcomes applications under which two or more entities would carry out the federal award; however, only one entity may be the applicant. Any others must be proposed as subrecipients (“subgrantees”). The applicant must be the entity that would have primary responsibility for carrying out the award, including administering the funding and managing the entire program.


TARGET POPULATION: Local agencies that oversee small- and medium-sized jails (i.e., with 500 beds or less), lockups, community confinement facilities, and juvenile confinement facilities.

SUMMARY: The purpose of this solicitation is to support local agencies that oversee small- and medium-sized jails (i.e., with 500 beds or less), lockups, community confinement facilities, and juvenile confinement facilities to initiate or expand efforts to implement the PREA standards and zero tolerance cultures related to sexual abuse and sexual harassment in these confinement facilities.

In correspondence and hundreds of requests for training and technical assistance (TTA) that BJA and PRC have received from the field, there is strong evidence that many local agencies that oversee small- and medium-sized jails (i.e., with 500 beds or less), lockups, community confinement facilities, and juvenile confinement facilities are not aware of—or do not fully understand—their responsibilities related to the PREA standards. Many such agencies are in the initial phases of their PREA-related work and are in need of strategic guidance and support to implement the PREA standards successfully.

An additional barrier to the adoption of the PREA standards in these smaller, locally run agencies is that the facilities they oversee are typically not covered by the Certification and Assurance process that is the reasonability of the nation’s Governors. This removes a key oversight mechanism related to compliance with the PREA standards in these local agencies, and, therefore, creates a need to proactively support standards implementation in them and the confinement facilities they oversee.

In light of the audit activity reported to BJA and PRC to date, the high numbers of small- and medium-sized jails (i.e., with 500 beds or less), lockups, community confinement facilities, and juvenile confinement facilities that are locally run and have not undergone PREA audits, and the fact that Governors’ Certifications and Assurances do not apply to many of these facilities, the primary purpose of this program is to provide needed resources and strategic support to such facilities. This will enable these facilities to initiate or expand their efforts to implement the PREA standards and create zero tolerance cultures related to sexual abuse and sexual harassment.

In collaboration with BJA, the selected provider—or team of providers—will work with competitively selected, local agencies that oversee small- and medium-sized jails (i.e., with 500 beds or less), lockups, community confinement facilities, and juvenile confinement facilities to:

  • Review and assess these agencies’ efforts to date to implement the PREA standards and zero tolerance cultures related to sexual abuse and sexual harassment
  • Develop plans to guide efforts in these agencies to implement the standards and zero tolerance cultures
  • Oversee implementation activities that are funded by resources available under this grant program.

Applicants may prioritize specific types of local facilities (e.g., jails and lockups, or community confinement facilities and juvenile confinement facilities, or jails, etc.) to be the primary focus of this program. If applicants chose to prioritize specific types of local facilities to be the primary focus of this program, they are strongly encouraged to articulate the reasons for and benefits of such prioritization, and clearly justify their proposed approach.



BJA expects the selected provider or team of providers to carry out specific activities in two primary project phases: Planning and Implementation. BJA anticipates that each phase will be 18 months in length. However, BJA recognizes that some project sites may be well positioned and equipped to move through the Planning Phase and/or the Implementation Phase more quickly than 18 months. As such, applicants should describe how the differing paces of work across the diverse project sites that are selected will be accommodated and managed throughout the 36-month project period.



Planning Phase: Month 1 – Month 18: During the Planning Phase, BJA expects that the selected provider or team of providers to:

  • Administer, with significant guidance and input from BJA, a competitive, national site selection process that targets local agencies that oversee small- and medium-sized jails (i.e., with 500 beds or less), lockups, community confinement facilities, and juvenile confinement facilities that are in need of support and assistance in initiating or expanding efforts to implement the PREA standards and zero tolerance cultures related to sexual abuse and sexual harassment in confinement. This will entail review and approval by BJA of a request for proposals (RFP) that is developed by the provider or team of providers to select local agencies. BJA will also be directly involved in the review of applications and selection of the local agencies to receive planning and implementation assistance related to PREA. BJA must approve the selection of all agencies.
  • Applicants for funding under this program must articulate the number of agencies to be supported under this program and explain how program resources will be used efficiently and effectively to achieve the program goals and objectives, and maximize the number of agencies served. Applicants for funding under this program are encouraged to consider how state, regional, and national networks and associations that represent confinement facilities that are the targets of this program can be included in this program, in order to increase the number of agencies that are served, and enhance their capacity to implement the PREA standards, and zero tolerance cultures in confinement.
  • Applicants should explain and describe key steps and milestones in the competitive process and articulate how they will ensure interest in this initiative from local agencies that oversee small- and medium-sized jails (i.e., with 500 beds or less), lockups, community confinement facilities, and juvenile confinement facilities across the nation. For example, applicants are encouraged to propose a marketing plan designed to reach the local agencies and facilities that are targeted by this program. Applicants should also consider if there are priority considerations that could be used to help guide the competitive selection of local sites.
  • Conduct a series of strategic visits to each site to evaluate progress made regarding PREA implementation, identify strengths and challenges related to each agency’s work to promote sexual safety in confinement facilities, and define targets for change to be addressed during this program’s Implementation Phase. These targets must be consistent with the requirements of the PREA standards and, if addressed successfully, should result in meaningful, long-term changes in agencies’/facilities’ cultures related to sexual abuse and sexual harassment.
  • Convene a strategic workshop that includes small teams of representatives from each participating site.
  • Develop a summary document that includes the site-specific findings that emerge from the Planning Phase of this program and the PREA implementation steps that the sites plan to take. This document will memorialize the work of the participating local agencies during the Planning Phase and inform the development of a comprehensive PREA Planning and Implementation Guide that is a key project deliverable and described below.

Implementation Phase: Month 19 – Month 36: Following the 18-month Planning Phase, the selected provider or team of providers, in close collaboration with BJA, will oversee an 18-month Implementation Phase in each of the local sites. In order for the selected provider or team of providers to transition from the Planning Phase to the Implementation Phase, BJA must review and approve the summary document that is described above, which includes the site-specific findings that emerge from the Planning Phase of this program. The following are BJA’s expectations of the selected provider or team of providers during this phase:

  • Assist the competitively selected project sites to finalize budgets to fund their strategic Implementation Plans, which will be developed during the 18-month Planning Phase described above, and make individual awards to support the work associated with carrying out these plans. Note that each project site budget will need to include a 50 percent match.
  • The work and activities supported by the program funding provided to the project sites must be consistent with the requirements of the PREA standards. Examples include, but are not limited to, the following:
    • Initiatives related to leadership and organizational culture change (Note: It is BJA’s expectation that the support provided to all the local agencies involved in this program will prioritize efforts to implement and enhance zero tolerance cultures related to sexual abuse and sexual harassment in confinement facilities.)
    • PREA policy and practice revision and implementation
    • Preventative equipment and technology enhancements (Note: The funding provided to the sites may be used to purchase “limited” equipment and supplies [e.g., rape kits, privacy screens, etc.]. “Limited” is defined as less than 40 percent of the total award made to a site. In cases where program funding is used on equipment and supplies, these expenditures must be part of a larger comprehensive Implementation Plan that focuses on implementing or enhancing a zero tolerance culture in confinement facilities, and achieving compliance with the PREA standards.)
    • Inmate/detainee/resident education related to PREA
    • Sexual abuse and sexual harassment victim support services such as the integration of victim-centric and trauma-informed strategies to equip staff, investigators, external providers, and medical and mental health practitioners to identify trauma and its symptoms, minimize re-traumatization, and provide services that are sensitive to the individualized needs of victims who are inmates/residents/detainees
    • Data collection, performance measurement, and evaluation related to efforts to prevent, detect, and respond to sexual abuse and sexual harassment in confinement facilities
    • Planning, analysis, and training focused on enhancing staff support and training related to the PREA standards
    • Preparing for and conducting PREA audits
  • Note: Project site grant funds may not be used to contract with the recipient of the award under this solicitation, or any program partners under the award.
  • Oversee and manage the work of the project sites to expend program resources and carry out their Implementation Plans effectively. Applicants should outline the types of support (e.g., site visits, delivery of targeted TTA, etc.) that will be provided to the sites during the Implementation Phase to ensure that they are successful in carrying out their Implementation Plans and to guarantee that they sustain their PREA work long after this 36-month program concludes.
  • Develop and disseminate a practical, user-friendly PREA Planning and Implementation Guide that summarizes the lessons learned—and PREA work supported—during this program and provides guidance to agencies nationwide regarding critical steps to take to begin or enhance efforts to implement the PREA standards and zero tolerance cultures related to sexual abuse and sexual harassment. This guide must be completed by the selected provider or team of providers and integrate learnings from across the project sites.
  • Identify local “resource” or “learning” sites from among those receiving assistance under this program, and share the promising PREA-related work of these sites nationwide, so that others can learn from them and replicate their efforts.

LINK to RFP: https://www.bja.gov/funding/PREA17.pdf

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Centers for Disease Control (CDC)

Assuring Comprehensive Prevention and Treatment for Families Affected by HIV to Eliminate Perinatal HIV Transmission in the United States

DEADLINE: Applications due: June 12, 2017.

AWARD: $2,000,000 with $400,000 per year for five years.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: One award.

ELIGIBILITY: Domestic institutions or organizations are eligible to apply. Foreign institutions are not eligible to apply. An individual is not eligible to apply for this cooperative agreement. Applicants must propose applications that are specific to one or more of the “Focus Areas of Programmatic Interest” (HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD or TB prevention). Applications that do not comply with this requirement will be determined non-responsive and will not be reviewed.

TARGET POPULATION: The applicant should include people with disabilities, e.g., persons living with HIV in the target population as well as in key aspects of the project (e.g., advisory boards, planning committees, project staff, consultants, etc.). Where appropriate, applicants are encouraged to also include: tribal organizations; rural populations; non-English speaking populations; lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) populations; and people with limited health literacy. Applicants should describe how they will include women of childbearing age who are living with HIV when they plan, implement and evaluate their program. For additional information about disability inclusion, go to: http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/disabilityandhealth/disability-inclusion.html.

SUMMARY: To maintain and improve upon gains in the prevention of perinatal HIV transmission in the United States and to improve the continua of HIV prevention and HIV care for women of childbearing age, this FOA has a number of goals. The awardee will collaborate with CDC to update the Framework for the Elimination of Mother-to-Child HIV Transmission in the United States and increase the awareness of clinicians and public health professionals about it. They will increase the number of state and local health departments describing progress in the elimination of perinatal HIV infections by developing and disseminating model strategies for jurisdictions to describe their progress using measures from the updated Framework. They will increase the knowledge among health care providers and public health professionals about the interaction of, and essential role of HIV care for adults in the prevention of perinatal HIV transmission. And they will further the implementation of the updated Framework by convening a stakeholder group to develop and implement action plans as well as share best practices and educational content to a large network of relevant professionals.

The following are the outcomes the awardee is expected to both achieve and measure during the project period:

  • Increase awareness among clinicians of the updated EMCT Framework;
  • Increase number of state and local health departments describing progress in elimination of perinatal HIV infections;
  • Increase knowledge among providers about the interaction of HIV care of adults and prevention of perinatal HIV transmission; and
  • Maintain the gains (e.g., low number of infections) in prevention of perinatal HIV transmission.

LINK to RFP: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html, FOA #: CDC-RFA-PS17-1712.

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Centers for Disease Control (CDC)

Data to Care Rx: Using Real-time Prescription Claims Data to Support the HIV Care Continuum

DEADLINE: Applications due: June 5, 2017 by 11:59 pm ET. Non-mandatory Letter of Intent due: May 5, 2017.

AWARD: $2,000,000 for the three year length of the project with $250,000 the first year and $875,000 the second and third year.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: One award.

ELIGIBILITY: Domestic Institutions or organizations are eligible to apply. Foreign institutions are not eligible to apply. An individual is not eligible to apply for this cooperative agreement. Applicants must propose applications that are specific to one or more of the “Focus Areas of Programmatic Interest” (HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD or TB prevention). Applicants who do not comply with this requirement will be determined non-responsive and will not be reviewed.

TARGET POPULATION: Persons with HIV who fail to pick up prescribed ARV medications by 30, 60 and 90 days.

SUMMARY: The purpose of this cooperative agreement is to develop and implement a “Data-to-Care Rx” model which uses pharmacy claims data to identify persons with HIV who fail to pick up prescribed ARV medications by 30, 60 and 90 days, and to target these individuals for adherence, retention and re-linkage interventions.

The awardee must use pharmacy claims data to identify persons who fail to pick up prescribed ARVs after 30 days and conduct a low intensity 1st line adherence intervention that may be conducted by a Pharmacy Benefits Manager, insurer, filling pharmacy or other source. Persons identified as 60 days late will receive 2nd line adherence and retention interventions at the prescribing project clinics and/or filling pharmacies. Persons identified as 90 days late will receive a 3rd line intervention where the health department uses Disease Intervention Specialists or similar staff to locate and re-link the individuals to the prescribing clinic.

Outcomes:

  1. Increased re-linkage in care among persons living with HIV in the project
  2. Increased ARV adherence among persons living with HIV in the project
  3. Increased retention in care among persons living with HIV in the project
  4. Increased viral suppression among persons living with HIV in the project

Specific activities of the cooperative agreement are broadly categorized into three areas:

  1. develop the Data-to-Care Rx model
  2. implement the model and
  3. evaluate project outcomes and disseminate results. After implementation and final adjustments to the model the model will be finalized.

The project model requires:

  1. a pharmacy claims data source
  2. project clinics and/or pharmacies and
  3. a health department and Disease Intervention Specialists.

This 3-year project includes the following activities:

The applicant shall work with CDC and the Project Team to conduct the following activities:

Strategy #1: Develop model to use pharmacy claims data to identify persons who fail to pick up prescribed ARVs and to intervene

Activities:

  • Develop procedures for using pharmacy claims data from Pharmacy Benefit Manager (PBM), insurer(s) or other source(s) to identify persons with HIV who failed to pick up prescribed ARVs by 30, 60 and 90 days.
  • Develop procedures and 1st, 2nd and 3rd line interventions for persons who failed to pick up prescribed ARVs.
    • 1st line intervention
      • 1st line intervention should be a low intensity intervention (e.g., contacting the patient to remind them to pick up the prescribed ARV).
      • The applicant must describe a process for the 1st line intervention that will be implemented for a very broad portion of the population who failed to pick up prescribed ARVs by 30 days (ideally, offered to all) that may be an 1) intervention from an insurer or PBM; 2) an intervention from the pharmacy where the prescription was last filled or 3) other intervention.
      • The 1st line intervention must be designed such that it is easily integrated into the current business practice and workflow. For instance, if the intervention comes from the insurer or PBM, the model should use existing processes and staff that can be assigned to implement it.
      • If the intervention comes from the pharmacy, it should be designed such that it can be integrated into the pharmacy’s usual daily workflow. The pharmacy intervention may include using a Medication Therapy Management intervention.
      • The applicant must describe how relationships will be established with pharmacies to implement interventions. For example, if a partnered insurer(s) has contracted pharmacies in a network, they may establish a process whereby the pharmacy is paid to contact the patient(s) as the 1st line intervention. The funds for such an arrangement are expected to be in the course of typical business that the insurer would provide. The funds from this FOA are not intended to be used to provide this type of service fee.
    • 2nd line intervention
      • Develop process for sharing the pharmacy claims data from the PBM, insurer or other data source with the project clinics and/or pharmacies including data sharing agreements if required.
      • Develop procedures for using the list of persons who failed to pick up prescribed ARVs by 60 days.
      • Develop process to inform prescribing clinics of patients who fail to pick up prescribed ARVs by 60 days, for both project clinics and non-project clinics.
      • Develop a new intervention, or implement an existing evidence-based intervention (such as interventions found at: https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/research/interventionresearch/compendium/lrc/index.html), to address adherence barriers and potential retention in care barriers.
    • 3rd line interventions
      • Develop process for sharing the pharmacy claims data from the PBM, insurer or other data source with the health department including data sharing agreements, if required.
      • Develop procedures for using the list of persons who failed to pick up prescribed ARVs by 90 days.
      • Develop process for locating patients who failed to pick up prescribed ARVs by 90 days, including the use of Disease Intervention Specialists.
      • Develop process to inform prescribing clinics of patients who fail to pick up prescribed ARVs by 90 days, for both project clinics and non-project clinics.
      • Develop process for re-linking patients to prescribing clinic.
      • Develop follow-up procedures.

Strategy #2: Implement model

Activities:

  • Obtain access to pharmacy claims data from a PBM, insurer or other source.
  • Partner with project clinics and/or pharmacies to implement 2nd line intervention
    • Applicants are required to collaborate with a sufficient number of clinics and/or pharmacies to achieve 400 enrolled patients.
    • Applicants are encouraged to collaborate with large HIV clinics in their jurisdiction and with a diversity of clinic types (e.g., Ryan White-funded, academic-affiliated, health maintenance organization, private, or veterans administration clinics).
    • If applicant intends to use pharmacies as project sites, the applicant should describe how relationships will be established with pharmacies to implement interventions.
    • Develop and conduct project site training including patient consent if required, data collection and project communications with each project clinic and/or pharmacy site.
    • Monitor project recruitment and enrollment and address recruitment and enrollment problems as they occur.
    • Manage project clinic and/or pharmacy sites, coordinate project site activities, and provide technical assistance to project sites (e.g., data collection and management).
  • Operationalize process at health department to implement the 3rd line intervention
  • Arrange for and finalize agreements/contracts with project partners including project clinics and/or pharmacies, health department and potentially the PBM or insurer(s).
    • Establish necessary agreements with the clinic and/or pharmacy project sites and health department (e.g. Memorandum of Understandings, financial agreements [i.e. contracts] and clinic and/or pharmacy project sites work plans) and make necessary arrangements for clinic and/or pharmacy site and health department participation.
    • Establish data sharing agreements between project partners if necessary.
  • Using the pharmacy claims data, develop list of persons who failed to pick up prescribed ARVs by 30, 60 and 90 days and conduct 1st, 2nd and 3rd line interventions.
    • Persons may receive 1, 2 or 3 interventions depending on whether the prior intervention was successful. The lines of interventions differ in approach, delivery and intensity.
    • 1st and 3rd line interventions should aim to reach as many persons as possible who were identified as failing to pick up prescribed ARVs by 30 and 90 days, respectively.
    • 2nd line interventions will be limited to the project clinic and/or pharmacy population unless otherwise decided by the Project Team. However, prescribing clinics (regardless of whether they are project clinics) should be informed of patients who fail to pick up prescribed ARVs by 60 days and 90 days.
    • Because the 2nd line intervention is a clinic-based (or pharmacy-based) intervention that only includes the project clinics and/or pharmacies populations, while the 1st and 3rd line interventions aim to reach as many persons as possible, some individuals may receive 1st and 3rd line interventions without receiving the 2nd line intervention.
    • Obtain ethical approval(s) including project IRB approval if required and assist project clinic and/or pharmacy sites and health department in obtaining local IRB approval, if required.
  • Finalize the service model
    • Document a comprehensive Data-to-Care Rx implementation model that includes a report to CDC with a detailed description of the implementation model and processes

Strategy #3: Evaluate project outcomes and disseminate results

Activities:

  • Collect and clean project data
  • Develop a data collection system
  • Analyze project data
  • Disseminate results through publications, abstracts and presentations.

LINK to RFP: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html, FOA #: CDC-RFA-PS17-1709.

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Centers for Disease Control (CDC)

Telemedicine to Improve HIV Care among Minority Persons Living with HIV in Urban Areas

DEADLINE: Applications due: May 30, 2017.

AWARD: Total available amount of $3,000,000 with Category A amount of $2,500,000 (with $834,000 per year) and Category B amount of $500,000 (with $166,000 per year) for a total of three years.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: Two awards (one in category A, one in category B).

ELIGIBILITY: To be considered responsive, Category A applicants must demonstrate the following:

  1. Eligible applicants must document activities will be conducted in a U.S. Office of Management and Budget-defined metropolitan statistical area (MSA).
  2. Eligible applicants must document activities will be conducted in an MSA with high HIV burden, as indicated by HIV diagnosis rates in 2015. See Table 26 of CDC’s 2015 HIV Surveillance Report: https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/pdf /library/reports /surveillance/cdc-hiv-surveillance-report-2015-vol-27.pdf.
  3. Eligible applicants must document they plan to conduct activities with at least 1,000 active (seen for HIV care and/or treatment in the 12 month period prior to application) PLWH.

To be considered responsive, Category B applicants must demonstrate the following:

  1. Eligible applicants must document at least 2 years of previous experience working with telemedicine programs.
  2. Eligible applicants should document experience working in HIV medical care and treatment services.

Applicants may only submit one application. Applicants may apply for either Category A or Category B.

TARGET POPULATION: Urban clinics serving predominantly minority persons living with HIV (PLWH).

SUMMARY: The National Center for HIV, Hepatitis, STDs, and Tuberculosis Prevention, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention has identified telemedicine as a promising strategy to improve retention in HIV care, and HIV service delivery for better patient health outcomes. This demonstration project will fund two awards, one for Category A: Implementation and Evaluation and one for Category B: Capacity Building and Technical Assistance.



The Category A awardee will implement and evaluate a telemedicine (TM) program in urban clinic(s) that have a patient base of at least 1,000 HIV-positive persons, the majority of whom are persons of color. The Category A awardee will be responsible for marketing TM, identifying and enrolling eligible patients, delivering clinical and case management services via TM, and evaluating the TM program through electronic medical record review and quantitative and qualitative assessments.



The Category B awardee will provide capacity building assistance for the TM program, will review and tailor an existing telemedicine program, conduct staff training, and providing capacity building and technical assistance to support the execution of the project.

The goals of this demonstration project are to create and implement a telemedicine program for urban clinics serving predominantly minority persons living with HIV (PLWH). The intent is to reduce barriers associated with poor retention in HIV care and increase service delivery accessibility and efficiency.



This demonstration project will tailor an existing telemedicine program to improve service delivery and retention in care for urban clinics serving predominantly minority PLWH in areas with increased HIV burden. The tailored telemedicine program will increase efficiency of care delivery and accessibility to care and case management services by reducing patient-level (i.e., access to affordable and reliable transportation, time to keep medical visits) and system-level (i.e., physician caseload, appointment backlog and extensive wait time) barriers associated with retention.



Short-Term Outcomes:

  • Increase availability of telemedicine (TM) program for minority PLWH in urban areas. Tailoring a TM program for this population will add to the tools available for HIV providers.
  • Increase acceptability of telemedicine among eligible patients. Culturally and linguistically appropriate TM services will make TM an acceptable alternative to in-person visits.
  • Increase provider and staff capacity to deliver TM.
  • Increase provider adoption of TM practice. This can be achieved through training, program promotion, and program champions.

Intermediate Outcomes:

  • Decrease missed appointments for TM.
  • Reduce cost for HIV service delivery using TM.
  • Decrease provider caseload. This can be achieved via SOPs and trainings encouraging caseload management through effective triaging of patients into TM or in-person care based on clinic criteria.
  • Increase patient satisfaction with HIV care.
  • Increase retention in case management for TM. Expanding telemedicine care delivery to include case management services.
  • Maintain VL suppression among TM patients.
  • Increase proportion of patients served via telemedicine.

LINK to RFP: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html, FOA #: CDC-RFA-PS17-1710.

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New York City Department of Youth and Community Development (DYCD)

Runaway and Homeless Youth Services (Open-Ended)

DEADLINE: Open-Ended.

AWARD: Available in RFP. Number of awards not mentioned in concept paper.

ELIGIBILITY: To receive this RFP in the HHS Accelerator system, you must have an approved Service Application for at least one of the following:

  • Preventive Services
  • Case Management
  • Shelter
  • Drop-in Center
  • Homelessness Prevention
  • Housing

TARGET POPULATION: Runaway and homeless youth and their families in New York City.

SUMMARY: The New York City Department of Youth and Community Development (DYCD) invests in a network of community based organizations and programs to alleviate the effects of poverty and provide opportunities for New Yorkers and communities to flourish.

DYCD funds a range of services for Runaway and Homeless Youth that includes Drop-in Centers, Crisis Shelters, Transitional Independent Living programs, and Street Outreach and Referral Services.


DYCD’s Runaway and Homeless Youth services are designed to protect runaway and homeless youth and reunite them with their families whenever possible.


In accordance with their mission to support the City’s youth and their families by funding high quality youth and community development programs, DYCD is seeking additional beds to be operated by qualified nonprofits organizations to provide residential beds within Crisis shelters or transitional independent living facilities.


LINK to RFP: http://www1.nyc.gov/assets/hhsaccelerator/downloads/pdf/DYCDRunawayandHomelessYouthServices.pdf, RFP available to eligible applicants in HHS Accelerator

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New York City Center for Economic Opportunity (CEO), New York City Human Resources Administration (HRA)

NYC Recovers

DEADLINE: Applications are accepted on a rolling basis, pending availability of funds.

AWARD: CEO will reimburse wages for work-readiness activities for up to 20% of weekly earnings for one to three months. : Participants will earn a minimum wage ($8.00 per hour until December 30, 2014; $8.75 per hour from December 31, 2014) plus up to 25% fringe.

ELIGIBILITY: Service providers already delivering work-readiness services to youth and/or unemployed adults (for example education services, case management, work readiness, job placement, mental health, or other services). These services should be in place when the subsidized jobs program begins and continue throughout.

TARGET POPULATION: Hurricane-affected residents ages 16 and above placed in general employment opportunities or to unemployed New Yorkers working directly in support of the recovery efforts in the Sandy-affected neighborhoods in Brooklyn, the Bronx, Manhattan, Queens, or Staten Island.

SUMMARY: The Center for Economic Opportunity (CEO) in partnership with the NYC Human Resources Administration (HRA) is seeking qualified service providers to deliver a new cycle of NYC Recovers – a subsidized wage program designed to both provide Hurricane Sandy-affected residents with general employment opportunities and to place unemployed New Yorkers in recovery-related work within Sandy-affected communities. Service providers will be responsible for selecting low-income or unemployed New Yorkers 16+.

The programs supported through this initiative will meet the following qualifications:

  • Service providers will recruit a minimum of five program participants.
  • Participants can workpart-time or full-time.
  • Subsidized employment will range from one to three months. Providers can propose a lengthier employment period, with adequate rationale.
  • Work experience should provide valuable job skills that can aid participants in obtaining unsubsidized employment after the subsidy period. Providers should assist participants in making this transition.
  • CEO will reimburse wages for work-readiness activities for up to 20% of weekly earnings.
  • WPP funding should not supplement or supplant any existing CEO City-funded subsidized job or internship initiatives.

Proposed projects must fall into one of the categories below:

  • External Placements: Sandy-affected residents can be placed in clerical, administrative or other positions outside the hurricane-affected neighborhoods. Examples of placement opportunities could include (but are not limited to) small businesses, offices, and the applicant’s central office.
  • Storm Recovery Placements: These projects directly support the local rebuilding efforts in storm-affected areas. Examples could include cleaning-up local community centers or libraries, painting local business, or removing debris.

LINK to RFP: http://www.nyc.gov/html/ceo/downloads/pdf/FY15-NYCR-Service-Provider-Application.pdf

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New York City Human Resources Administration (HRA)

NY/NY III Non-Emergency Permanent Supportive Congregate Housing for Chronically Homeless Single Adults Living with AIDS or Advanced HIV Illness

DEADLINE: This is an open-ended RFP; therefore, all proposals will be accepted and reviewed on an ongoing basis until all units covered by this RFP are sited.

AWARD: HRA has determined that the maximum cost per unit will be $25,444 per year. However, HRA reserves the right to develop contracts with a lower unit cost. Contractors should seek and secure the use of non-HRA funding and in kind contributions in their overall operating budget when applicable, to maximize economies of scale. Such funding would provide an offset to the negotiated annual budget amount.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: 145 units remaining

ELIGIBILITY: Permanent non-emergency facilities would accept all referrals forwarded for each vacant unit unless the program can demonstrate to HASA that the client is not suitable for the program.

TARGET POPULATION: Chronically homeless single adults living with HIV/AIDS or advanced HIV illness.

SUMMARY: HRA is seeking appropriately qualified vendors to operate and maintain approximately 145 units remaining of permanent supportive congregate housing for chronically homeless single adults who are living with HIV/AIDS and who suffer from a co-occurring serious and persistent mental illness, a substance abuse disorder, or a Mentally Ill Chemical Abuse (MICAS) disorder.

Under these programs the proposer is expected to provide case management and support services to clients to enable all eligible clients to achieve the skills and financial independence required for independent living. In addition, the proposer is required to maximize the client’s self-reliance and capacity for independence through referrals to employment programs for training, vocational rehabilitation and job placement. The proposer is expected to work with the target population to maximize functional capacity, reduce morbidity and mortality by linking clients to health, mental health and/or substance abuse treatment services and monitoring treatment adherence/compliance.


This is an Open-Ended RFP; therefore, proposals will be accepted and reviewed on an ongoing basis until all units covered by this RFP are sited.

RFP available at: http://www1.nyc.gov/site/hra/business/request-for-proposals.page, (see Request for Proposals for Provision of Non-Emergency Permanent Supportive Congregate Housing for Chronically Homeless Single Adults Living with AIDS or Advanced HIV Illness under the NY/NY III Supportive Housing Agreement (Opened Ended).

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New York State Department of Health

Doctors Across New York – Ambulatory Care Training Program

DEADLINE: Applications are due June 22, 2017, by 4PM EST.

AWARD: Up to $250,000 per year for 3.5 years.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: 10 awards anticipated.

ELIGIBILITY: To apply under this RFA, an applicant must be a sponsoring institution responsible for a residency program, as described below:

  1. A “sponsoring institution” means “the entity that has the overall responsibility for a program of graduate medical education. Such institutions shall include teaching general hospitals, medical schools, consortia and diagnostic and treatment centers.”
  2. Applicants must be able to demonstrate that they have overall responsibility for a program of graduate medical education (also known as a residency program), meaning a post-graduate medical education residency in the United States which is accredited by a nationally recognized accreditation body. For purposes of this RFA, this means that the applicant’s residency program has been accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) or the American Osteopathic Association (AOA).

If an applicant does not meet the definition of “sponsoring institution” as set forth above, does not have overall responsibility for a residency program, or does not upload documentation of ACGME/AOA accreditation, the application will not be reviewed.

TARGET POPULATION: Underserved communities in New York.

SUMMARY: The New York State Doctors Across New York (DANY) initiative includes several programs collectively designed to help train and place physicians in underserved communities in a variety of settings and specialties to care for New York’s diverse population. The DANY Ambulatory Care Training Program makes funding available to sponsoring institutions to provide clinical training of residents and medical students in freestanding ambulatory care sites.
For purposes of this Request for Applications (RFA), a sponsoring institution is a teaching hospital, a medical school, a consortium of medical schools or a diagnostic and treatment center (D&TC) that operates an accredited residency program. A freestanding ambulatory care site means a non-hospital operated D&TC licensed under PHL Article 28 or a private physician practice as further defined herein. The goal of the program is to enhance the clinical training experience and encourage residents and medical students to continue practicing in such settings.
Approximately $6.3 million in State funding is available under this RFA to support training programs over a three and one-half year period, contingent upon the continued availability of funding. In accordance with the authorizing statute, two-thirds of available funding is reserved for awardees from New York City (New York City is defined as the following five boroughs/counties: Manhattan/New York County; Bronx/Bronx County; Brooklyn/Kings County; Queens/Queens County & Staten Island/Richmond County) and one-third of the funding is reserved for awardees from the rest of the state, based upon the address of the sponsoring institution. The Department of Health (DOH) anticipates funding up to 10 contracts for the DANY Ambulatory Care Training initiative. An Ambulatory Care Training award may be up to $250,000 per year for three and one-half years.
Applications will be scored based on their ability to demonstrate that the applicant organization will successfully provide training for residents at freestanding ambulatory care sites. Applicants that also propose to train medical students will receive additional preference points in the evaluation. In addition, to help address the maldistribution of physicians within New York State, additional points will be available to sponsoring institutions that affiliate with freestanding ambulatory care sites located in underserved rural or urban areas of the state.


Successful applicants will be responsible for executing affiliation or other agreements with appropriate freestanding ambulatory care sites and overseeing the clinical training of residents and, if applicable, medical students at such sites.


An application may include more than one freestanding ambulatory care site and training in more than one specialty. Each application will be evaluated independently.

LINK to RFP: https://www.health.ny. gov/funding/rfa/17240/index.htm

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New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services

RFA for an Organization or Network of Organizations to Establish a Youth and Young Adult Statewide Recovery Network

DEADLINE: Applications are due June 1, 2017.

AWARD: one award with a maximum of $450,000 of funding for the anticipated period of July1, 2017 through June 30, 2018. Funding for this project is made possible by the State Targeted Response to the Opioid Crisis Grants through Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and is subject to second year of funding based on Federal Appropriations.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: 1 award

ELIGIBILITY: Permanent non-emergency facilities would accept all referrals forwarded for each vacant unit unless the program can demonstrate to HASA that the client is not suitable for the program.

TARGET POPULATION: The target population is comprised of youth and young adults (Y/YA) up to age 30.

SUMMARY: The NYS Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS) through its fiscal agent, the Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene (RFMH), announces a funding opportunity for a community-based organization and/or a network of community based-organizations to establish the statewide infrastructure to support local communities of youth and young adults in recovery from substance use disorders. A successful applicant will ensure that this is a youth and young adult-driven process, which includes “branding” the youth and young adult recovery movement in New York State, establishing a social marketing plan, and providing coordination and technical assistance to burgeoning organizations and communities of youth and young adults in recovery.

LINK to RFP: https://oasas.ny.gov/procurements/documents/RFAYYARecoveryOrganization-final4-24-17.pdf

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Office of Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Programs (OJJDP)

Second Chance Act: Implementing County and Statewide Plans To Improve Outcomes for Youth in the Juvenile Justice System

DEADLINE: Applications due: June 29, 2017.

AWARD: Awards ranging from $750,000 to $1,000,000, with an estimated total amount awarded of up to $3,500,000 for a 24-month period of performance.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: Up to four awards.


ELIGIBILITY: Eligible applicants are limited to units of local government and states that have developed a countywide or statewide plan to reduce recidivism and improve outcomes for youth in contact with the juvenile justice system. Eligible applicants must have developed and attached a completed jurisdiction-wide plan to the application.

TARGET POPULATION: This solicitation will support the implementation of a countywide or statewide plan to improve outcomes for youth in contact with the juvenile justice system. As a result, the target population should be all youth involved in the juvenile justice system, with a specific emphasis on youth assessed in the strategic plan, using a validated risk assessment tool, as moderate and high risk for reoffending; under community supervision; and placed in and returning from a period of incarceration in state, local, and privately run facilities.



Award recipients must admit targeted youth to the program prior to their 18th birthday. However, they may continue to implement their plan for these individuals beyond their 18th birthday. OJJDP does not have a set timeline for terminating these services; instead, they can continue as long as is deemed necessary per the statewide plan for providing services.


SUMMARY: This program will provide grants to support counties and states that have developed a recidivism reduction plan to better align juvenile justice policy, practice, and resource allocation with what research shows works to reduce recidivism and improve outcomes for youth in contact with the juvenile justice system. OJJDP expects that a committee, task force, or working group will designate an agency to act as the legal applicant for this grant program. This solicitation will support counties and states that illustrate their readiness to implement a planning strategy developed and coordinated among multiple systems, to track implementation progress, and to show progress toward sustainable changes.

Significant barriers to improving youth outcomes include (1) insufficient fidelity to the program model or strategy when implementing research-based improvement strategies; (2) limited collaboration across government agencies, service systems, and state/local lines; and (3) a lack of data to track and measure progress and hold agencies and providers accountable for results.



To address these challenges, counties and states need a comprehensive implementation plan to better align their juvenile justice policies, practices, and resource allocation with what works to improve outcomes for youth.



Successful applicants will use OJJDP funding to implement existing countywide or statewide planning strategies to reduce recidivism and improve outcomes for youth. These plans must have been formalized through legislation, appropriations, and/or administrative policy and/or have resulted from two or more state or county agencies collaborating on key policy and practice changes. These plans and all implementation activities should reflect the key principles and practices for improving outcomes for youth outlined in Appendix A of the RFA. OJJDP will provide funding and technical assistance to grantees to support and guide adherence to these principles and practices.



The goal of this program is for selected counties and states to (1) implement an existing plan for systemwide improvement to reduce juvenile recidivism rates and (2) improve other outcomes for youth countywide or statewide. To support this program, OJJDP will provide grants to county and state government agencies to commence implementation strategies over a 2-year period. Successful applicants must be able to develop and execute a strategy to:

  • Implement an existing statewide plan to better align juvenile justice policy, practice, and resource allocation with what the research shows works to reduce recidivism and improve other outcomes for youth in contact with the juvenile justice system.
  • Implement policy, practice, and resource allocation changes with fidelity to research-based strategies.
  • Track recidivism rates and other youth outcomes to measure implementation progress, share these data with system leaders and policymakers, use data to hold providers and agencies accountable for results, and guide implementation improvements.

Mandatory Requirements: Section 101 of the Second Chance Act outlines the following mandatory requirements that applicants must include in their applications to be eligible to secure Section 101 funding. Applicants under this solicitation must provide and demonstrate all of the following:

  1. A reentry strategic plan that describes the jurisdiction’s long-term reentry strategy, including measurable annual and 5-year performance outcomes, and that uses, to the maximum extent possible, random assigned and controlled studies to determine the effectiveness of the program in relation to the long-term goals of increasing public safety and reducing recidivism. One goal of the plan shall be a 50-percent reduction in the recidivism rate over a 5-year period. Applicants should describe and attach their current reentry strategic plan with the understanding that if they receive a grant, OJJDP will provide intensive technical assistance and the state will work toward a comprehensive data- and research-driven plan to reduce recidivism. Additionally, OJJDP will provide specific guidance on how to set reasonable, yet achievable, recidivism reduction goals during the early implementation process.
  2. A detailed reentry implementation schedule and sustainability plan for the program.
  3. If presently a recipient of a Second Chance Act grant award, describe implementation program gaps that would be addressed if additional funding is awarded through this solicitation, and how the proposed funding would augment and further advance implementation strategies.
  4. Documentation that reflects the establishment and ongoing engagement of a reentry task force composed of relevant state, tribal, territorial, or local leaders and representatives of relevant agencies, service providers, nonprofit organizations, and other key stakeholders.
  5. Discussion of the role of local and county government agencies; nonprofit organizations; continuums of care; state, county, or local interagency councils on homelessness; and community stakeholders that will coordinate and collaborate during the implementation of the reentry strategy. These partners and participants in the creation of the reentry strategy should include representatives from the fields of public safety, corrections, housing (including partnerships with the public housing authorities), homeless services providers, health, education, substance abuse, children and families, victims’ services, employment, and business.
  6. Extensive evidence of collaboration with state, county, and local government agencies within the target area(s) overseeing health, mental health, housing, homeless services, child welfare, education, substance abuse treatment, victims’ services, state child support, and employment services, and with local law enforcement agencies.
  7. Comprehensive discussion of the role of state juvenile corrections departments, community corrections agencies, and local detention systems in ensuring successful reentry of youth leaving out-of-home placement and returning to their communities. Applications must include letters of support from corrections officials responsible for facilities or the reentry population to be served through this project.
  8. Documentation that reflects explicit support of the chief executive officer of the applicant’s county or state and how this office will remain informed about and connected to the implementation of this program.
  9. A description of the evidence-based methodology and outcome measures that the state or county will use to evaluate the program and a discussion of how such measures will provide a valid assessment of the program’s impact. The primary objective of the Second Chance Act is to reduce recidivism.
  10. A description of how the county or state could broadly replicate the project if it is demonstrated to be effective.
  11. A plan for analyzing the statutory, regulatory, rules-based, and practice-based hurdles to reintegration of formerly incarcerated youth into the community. OJJDP encourages applicants to review the database of the American Bar Association National Study on the Collateral Consequences of Criminal Convictions, which catalogs statutes and administrative rules that contain a collateral consequence. The database (www.abacollateralconsequences.org) will help attorneys, policymakers, and the public more easily identify what consequences follow from particular criminal offenses.
  12. A baseline recidivism rate for the proposed target population, including documentation to support the development of the rate. OJJDP will require all grantees to provide a baseline recidivism rate upon award.

OJJDP will give priority consideration to applicants who can best demonstrate that their proposal will:

  1. Focus their initiative on geographic areas with a disproportionate population of system-involved youth released from confinement.
  2. Include input from nonprofit organizations in any case where relevant input is available and appropriate to the grant application, consultation with crime victims, youth released from youth facilities, and coordination with families of justice-involved youth.
  3. Demonstrate effective case assessment and management abilities to provide comprehensive and continuous reentry, including planning while youth are in a facility, prerelease transition housing, and community release; establishing prerelease planning procedures to ensure that the youth’s eligibility for federal or state benefits upon release is established prior to release, subject to any limitations in law, and to ensure that returning youth obtain all necessary referrals for services; and delivering continuous and appropriate drug treatment, medical care, job training and placement, educational services, or any other service or support needed for successful functioning in their communities.
  4. Review the process by which the applicant adjudicates violations of parole, probation, or supervision following placement under supervision and/or release from a youth facility, taking into account public safety and the use of graduated, community-based sanctions for minor and technical violations of parole, probation, or supervision (specifically those violations that are not otherwise, and independently, a violation of law).
  5. Provide for an independent evaluation of reentry programs that include, to the maximum extent possible, random assignment and controlled studies to determine the effectiveness of such programs.
  6. Target high-risk, justice-involved youth for community supervision programs through validated assessment tools.

LINK to RFP: https://www.ojjdp.gov/grants/solicitations/FY2017/SCAOutcomes.pdf

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Office of Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Programs (OJJDP)

Smart on Juvenile Justice: Systemwide Reform and Reinvestment Initiative

DEADLINE: Applications Due: June 29, 2017.

AWARD: Under Category 1, OJJDP estimates that it will award three planning grants of up to $300,000 each for a performance period of 24 months, to begin on October 1, 2017.

Under Category 2, OJJDP estimates that it will award one cooperative agreement of up to $1,200,000 for a performance period of 24 months, to begin on October 1, 2017.

OJJDP expects to make up to three awards under Category 1 and one award under Category 2 of this solicitation, with an estimated total amount awarded of $2,100,000.



OJJDP anticipates that it may provide up to 12 months of supplemental funding in future years under Category 2 for up to $1,000,000, depending on the number of applications from states that are requesting implementation TTA for systemwide reform efforts.


ELIGIBILITY: This initiative is composed of two categories. Eligibility differs by category.

  • Category 1: Systemwide Juvenile Justice Reform Planning Grants. Eligible applicants are limited to states (including territories and the District of Columbia). Award recipients of the FY 2016 Smart on Juvenile Justice Category 1: Systemwide Juvenile Justice Reform Planning Grants are not eligible to apply. Applicants must submit letters of support, on agency letterhead, from key stakeholders and task force members who will participate in the planning and strategizing, demonstrating a commitment to participate in and support the reform planning process.
  • Category 2: Systemwide Reform Implementation Training and Technical Assistance. Eligible applicants are limited to nonprofit organizations and for-profit organizations (including tribal nonprofit and for-profit organizations) and institutions of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education). For-profit organizations (as well as other recipients) must forgo any profit or management fee.

OJJDP welcomes applications under which two or more entities would carry out the federal award; however, only one entity may be the applicant.

TARGET POPULATION: Juvenile justice system.


SUMMARY: The Smart on Juvenile Justice Strategy consists of the following action steps:

  1. Engage stakeholders across branches of government, political parties, and key stakeholder groups, such as victim advocates, prosecutors, courts, law enforcement, school systems, community-based organizations, youth, and families.
  2. Analyze data to identify juvenile justice populations and cost drivers.
  3. Assist states with the implementation of systemwide reform strategies and enacted legislation through effective, data-driven, evidence-based programs and strategies to reduce secure confinement and associated costs, eliminate disparities, and increase public safety.
  4. Support sustainability through measurement of the implementation of the Smart on Juvenile Justice Strategy and reinvestment efforts.

The overarching goals of the Smart on Juvenile Justice Initiatives are as follows:

  1. Identify drivers of secure confinement/out-of-home placement and costs.
  2. Prevent unnecessary confinement/out-of-home placement and reduce reoffending while improving youth outcomes.
  3. Ensure equitable treatment of all justice-involved youth.
  4. Improve allocation of resources to yield more cost-beneficial impacts on public safety.

Category 1: Systemwide Juvenile Justice Reform Planning Grants

This program will support states’ efforts to develop planning tools and resources that will support systemwide juvenile justice reform strategies. Selected states will (1) develop strategies to improve public safety and outcomes for youth, their families, and the communities in which they live; (2) develop strategies to reduce the use of out-of-home placement and increase the use of effective community-based alternatives, including early intervention, diversion, and evidence-based programs; (3) develop strategies to ensure sustainability of reform efforts; and (4) develop strategies for reinvestment of cost savings/cost aversion realized through reform efforts. As the number of youth in out-of-home placement is reduced, OJJDP encourages states to close underutilized large juvenile justice facilities and invest funding in evidence-informed community programs and small, home-like facilities that are more likely to reduce recidivism and improve youth outcomes.

Selected applicants will engage in the following planning activities:

  • Convene and collaborate with a diverse committee of critical stakeholders, including state-level or local-level decision-makers, juvenile court judges, juvenile justice agency leaders (including juvenile probation, detention, and corrections), policymakers, mental health professionals, community advocates, schools, prosecutors, law enforcement, youth- and family-serving community-based or faith-based organizations, justice-involved youth and their families, and others concerned with the fair administration of juvenile justice. The stakeholders should represent urban, suburban, rural, and tribal communities, as appropriate.
  • Develop strategies to ensure that the strategic plans are transparent and thoroughly vetted across essential stakeholder groups.
  • Build coalitions and develop agreements to formalize roles and responsibilities of the reform planning committee.
  • Develop strategies to collect, share, and examine data and decisions related to juvenile arrest, detention, referral to court, diversion, adjudication, disposition to probation, out-of-home-placement, other sanctions or services, and aftercare as part of a formal and transparent review of the juvenile justice system.
  • Identify data gaps and provide recommendations to improve the quality of data collection and measurement practices.
  • Convene working groups of key stakeholders to discuss policy options and forge consensus on recommendations for a systemwide juvenile justice reform strategic plan.
  • Develop tools and systems that will assist the jurisdiction with collecting and sharing data.
  • Develop a strategic plan with assistance from an OJJDP-approved TTA provider that will (1) identify drivers of justice-involved youth populations and costs, (2) discuss ways to reduce out-of-home placement and/or the unnecessary confinement of juveniles, and (3) discuss ways to allocate resources to yield more cost-beneficial impacts on public safety and the reduction of recidivism.
  • Attend OJJDP’s TTA-sponsored activities, including one or more meetings with representatives from other Smart on Juvenile Justice Programs.
  • Work collaboratively and share information, as requested, with OJJDP-approved TTA providers.
  • Develop a systemwide, multicomponent, juvenile justice reform strategic plan during the 24-month project period.
  • Work closely with and receive TTA from OJJDP-approved TTA providers.

The program narrative should reflect how the applicant will accomplish these activities and deliverables, including specific plans and capabilities for assessing the efficacy and efforts to ensure equitable treatment of all justice-involved youth. The program narrative should demonstrate the applicants’ commitment to working closely and sharing information with OJJDP-approved TTA providers. Program narratives should include a position for an on-the-ground, jurisdiction-wide coordinator to serve as the state or locality primary liaison with OJJDP and OJJDP-approved TTA providers. In addition, if applicants are currently engaged in juvenile justice system reform activities (i.e., community supervision, juvenile defense systems), the program narrative should discuss how the state’s current reform activities will be coordinated with proposed activities under this solicitation.

Category 2: Systemwide Reform Implementation Training and Technical Assistance

OJJDP will support a TTA provider to assist up to seven selected states that have completed a juvenile justice systemwide reform strategic plan and/or have recently enacted policy changes intended to reform the state’s juvenile justice system and are seeking TTA that focuses on implementing juvenile justice reforms to enhance public safety, hold youth appropriately accountable, reduce reoffending, maximize cost savings, and support strategic reinvestment of the savings while supporting systemwide change. The TTA provider will provide TTA to assist the selected states in effectively implementing systemwide, multicomponent, juvenile justice system reform through the following action steps:

Stakeholder Engagement

The TTA provider will work with governmental and nongovernmental stakeholders of the state’s juvenile justice system to (1) orient them to the justice reinvestment process, including drafting a publication documenting the challenges states accepted for TTA seek to address and describing the process to come; (2) seek input on understanding justice system data and processes, interpreting analytic and qualitative findings, and assessing feasibility and providing information on the potential impact of policy recommendations; (3) involve and inform stakeholders in implementation in an ongoing way; and (4) set up processes for continued stakeholder engagement as technical assistance concludes. Such stakeholders typically include legislators, gubernatorial advisors, judges, corrections executives (both institutional and community supervision), prosecutors, defense counsel, law enforcement, parole board members, victims’ advocates, business leaders, nonprofit service providers, local private foundations, and leadership from departments that provide behavioral health treatment and recovery services.

Data Analysis

The TTA that will be provided to state stakeholders includes (1) conducting a comprehensive analysis of state juvenile justice data, including crime and arrest rates, pre- and postadjudication rates, community supervision, out-of-home placement, and confinement populations; (2) conducting a system assessment to ascertain the extent that policies, procedures, and practices adhere to the principles of effective correctional interventions; (3) assessing the capability of the juvenile justice system stakeholders to collect, analyze, and share information for purposes of making data-driven policy decisions related to out-of-home placement/confinement and sentencing; (4) evaluating the cost effectiveness of state spending on out-of-home placement/confinement and community supervision; and (5) presenting findings to the state in a comprehensible, clear, and concise manner.

This comprehensive analysis and evaluation shall include an analysis of the following:

  • Reported crime and arrest and referral data.
  • Postadjudication data to understand the percent of adjudicated juveniles who are sentenced to out-of-home placement or confinement.
  • Out-of-home placement admissions and length-of-stay data over a 3- to 5-year time period to determine which cohorts of juveniles are driving the growth of the population.
  • Development of a juvenile population projection using a simulation model to test the impact of various policy changes.
  • Current capacity and quality of institutional and community-based risk-reduction programs such as juvenile drug treatment programs, mental health, and other social services to reduce recidivism among juveniles on community supervision.
  • Juvenile justice expenditures and the development of practical, data-driven policy options, including high-performing programs that research shows can increase public safety, improve juvenile accountability, reduce recidivism, and manage the growth of corrections spending.

Policy Development

The TTA provider will (1) assist the state in implementing data-driven juvenile justice systemwide reform strategies that can increase public safety and improve juvenile accountability and outcomes for states and (2) assist the state with analyzing the impact of reform strategies on juvenile populations and community supervision populations, as appropriate.



Supporting Sustainability


Concurrent with the implementation assistance described above, TTA will aim to enhance sustainability of enacted legislation changes and will include development of robust performance and outcome measures, including measurement of costs saved or averted and amounts reinvested. The TTA provider will also support a state-level, interbranch group tasked with oversight of the state’s implementation of justice reinvestment policies. The group will be headed by the jurisdiction’s chief executive (e.g., governor) and leading judicial and legislative officials, and staffed by a cross-section of juvenile justice and youth-serving agencies within the jurisdiction. This task force will undertake a comprehensive review of the state’s newly implemented juvenile justice reform strategies, oversee implementation activities, and develop a strategy for tracking short- and long-term reform outcomes after the state stops receiving TTA from OJJDP.


LINK to RFP: https://www.ojjdp.gov/grants/solicitations/FY2017/SJJReform.pdf

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Office of Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Programs (OJJDP)

Youth With Sexual Behavior Problems Program

DEADLINE: Applications due: June 29, 2017.

AWARD: Up to $300,000 for each project site, with an estimated total amount awarded of up to $600,000 for a 24-month period of performance.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: UP to two awards.


ELIGIBILITY: Eligible applicants are limited to states (including territories), units of local government, federally recognized Indian tribal governments as determined by the Secretary of the Interior, nonprofit organizations and for-profit organizations (including tribal nonprofit and for-profit organizations), and institutions of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education). For-profit organizations (as well as other recipients) must forgo any profit or management fee. Organizations currently receiving funds through an OJJDP Youth With Sexual Behavior Problems Program solicitation are not eligible to apply.



OJJDP welcomes applications under which two or more entities would carry out the federal award; however, only one entity may be the applicant

TARGET POPULATION: Youth with sexual behavior problems, their child victim(s), and parents/caregivers of the offending youth and child victims. Youth targeted for program services should have no prior history of court involvement for sexual offenses. OJJDP must approve any deviation from this target population parameter prior to admission to the program.


SUMMARY: This program will fund agencies that can support a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach to provide intervention and supervision services for youth with sexual behavior problems and treatment services for their child victims and families. Youth participating in this program must undergo a mental health evaluation to determine if they are amenable to community-based treatment and intervention.

The program will focus on interfamilial and/or coresidential child victims and youth with problematic sexual behaviors. Examples of these types of sexual behaviors include, but are not limited to, sexual contact between children who do not know each other well (i.e., foster home or institutional setting); sexual contact between children of different ages, sizes, and developmental levels; aggressive or coerced sexual contact; sexual contact that causes harm to the child or others; and sexual contact that causes another child to be highly upset and/or fearful.



OJJDP will fund new program sites that will provide a comprehensive community-based intervention model to serve youth who have sexual behavior problems and are in pre- or post-adjudication for inappropriate sexual behavior with a family member, coresident, or other child with close social ties to the youth who committed the offense. The proposed interventions should also include support services for the child victim and nonoffending family or household members. Applicants should have a functioning multidisciplinary team that can support a comprehensive, holistic approach to treat both the child victim and the youth with sexual behavior problems and a history of working with interfamilial child abuse cases. At a minimum, multidisciplinary teams should consist of social services staff, probation staff, juvenile court staff, mental health personnel, victim advocate personnel, law enforcement, and community-support providers. This team should serve as the case staffing entity to determine service provision, including treatment and case management and supervision for the youth with sexual behavior problems, the child victim, and their families.



Teams should be aware of which professionals can serve youth when their behavior is considered illegal sexual behavior within their jurisdiction, and plan accordingly in regard to serving youth deferred and youth adjudicated for an illegal sexual behavior.

The successful applicant will develop and implement a comprehensive program for the target population over a 24-month period. OJJDP expects program sites to work closely with the training and technical assistance provider and include their community partners in the collaborative learning process that the training and technical assistance provider will establish.

Deliverables for the program sites will serve as a guide to other communities that wish to replicate the program and will include the development and/or use of the following:

  • A comprehensive community-based strategy to treat youth ages 9 to 14 with sexual behavior problems who are in pre- or post-adjudication status for inappropriate sexual misconduct against a child family member, coresident, or other child with close social ties.
  • An evidence-based treatment curriculum responsive to the targeted population (i.e., youth with sexual behavior problems, child victims of youth with sexual behavior problems, parents/caregivers).
  • A multidisciplinary team to address sexual behavior problems in youth, to include social services staff, probation staff, juvenile court staff, mental health personnel, victim advocate personnel, law enforcement, and community-support providers.
  • A strategy to provide community-based support services to child victims and families of youth with sexual behavior problems.
  • Reports that speak to the effectiveness of the community-based interventions and the challenges encountered during implementation, to be submitted to OJJDP and the training and technical assistance provider.

LINK to RFP: https://www.ojjdp.gov/grants/solicitations/FY2017/YSBP.pdf

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Office of Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Programs (OJJDP)

Juvenile Justice Systems Reform Promising Practices

DEADLINE: Applications due: June 19, 2017.

AWARD: Up to $1,000,000 for a 24-month period of performance.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: One award.


ELIGIBILITY: Eligible applicants are limited to nonprofit organizations1 and for-profit organizations (including tribal nonprofit and for-profit organizations) and institutions of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education). For-profit organizations (as well as other recipients) must forgo any profit or management fee.

OJJDP welcomes applications under which two or more entities would carry out the federal award; however, only one entity may be the applicant.

TARGET POPULATION: Juvenile justice system.


SUMMARY: OJJDP is committed to promoting juvenile justice reform through the adoption of data-driven decisionmaking; evidence-based programs and practices (see OJJDP’s Model Programs Guide); and a developmentally appropriate, trauma-informed approach to juvenile justice (see the National Research Council’s Reforming Juvenile Justice: A Developmental Approach). In recognition of a growing body of research on effective community-based approaches to juvenile justice and delinquency prevention, and the limited effect that secure confinement has on reducing juvenile offending and recidivism, OJJDP’s juvenile justice reform strategy (the Strategy) is focused on developing and implementing juvenile justice reforms that:

  • Enhance public safety.
  • Reduce reoffending and improve youth outcomes while holding youth appropriately accountable.
  • Improve outcomes for youth returning to their communities after out-of-home placement.
  • Reduce preadjudicatory detention and out-of-home placements and strengthen diversion and community-based alternatives.
  • Eliminate harmful disparities in the juvenile justice system.
  • Maximize cost savings and cost aversion.
  • Support the strategic reinvestment of these savings toward sustainable, systemic change.

The successful applicant will assist OJJDP with coordination and assessment of OJJDP’s juvenile justice system reform programs by collecting and analyzing performance measurement data, models, and tools developed across the initiatives; coordinating meeting roundtables so that grantees and training and technical assistance providers can share information and learning; assessing program models to improve quality; and creating resource guides and other tools that highlight the initiatives and demonstrate reform possibilities for other states, territories, and tribes across the nation. Juvenile justice reform programs for assessment and coordination may include the following:

  • Systemwide Reform and Reinvestment Initiative.
  • Second Chance Act Statewide Reform Implementation.
  • Smart on Juvenile Justice: Enhancing Youth Access to Justice Initiative.
  • Second Chance Act Community Supervision.
  • Out-of-Home Placement.
  • Smart on Juvenile Justice: Technical Assistance To Better Understand and Address
  • Disparities in the Juvenile Justice System.
  • Smart on Juvenile Justice: Age of Criminal Responsibility Training and Technical Assistance.
  • Smart on Juvenile Justice: Juvenile Prosecution Curriculum Development, Training and Technical Assistance.

The goal of this program is to develop tools and resources that will coordinate, synthesize, collect, and interpret the outcomes, models, and best practices of OJJDP’s juvenile justice system reform programs.

The program will address the following key objectives:

  • Development of tools and resources, to include (1) reports that synthesize data and resources collected from OJJDP’s juvenile justice reform programs; (2) reports and materials that highlight policies, strategies, and models from OJJDP’s juvenile justice reform programs; (3) tools that interpret relevant program information from juvenile justice reform policies and strategies, including relevant juvenile justice measures, reductions in recidivism and out-of-home placement, the savings accrued and costs averted, and the portion of costs saved or averted that has been or will be invested in high-performing strategies, that have been collected under OJJDP’s juvenile justice reform programs; and (4) publications on topics of relevance for state, tribal, and local policymakers who are planning or implementing juvenile justice system reform efforts, such as informational briefs or reports on the experiences of sites apart from OJJDP’s juvenile justice reform programs.
  • Coordination and facilitation of meetings, webinars, and roundtables, to assist OJJDP’s juvenile justice reform programs with sharing success stories, models, lessons learned, and program outcomes.
  • Development and dissemination of publications and online resources, to be housed on OJJDP’s website, that will highlight reform efforts, models, and lessons learned from OJJDP’s juvenile justice reform programs.

LINK to RFP: https://www.ojjdp.gov/grants/solicitations/FY2017/JJReformPP.pdf

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Office of Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Programs (OJJDP)

Family Drug Court Statewide System Reform Implementation

DEADLINE: Applications due: June 19, 2017.

AWARD: Awards ranging from $402,655 to $852,655 each based on state population numbers, see below, with an estimated total amount awarded of up to $2,663,275 for a 12-month period of performance.

Over 16 million in population = $852,655

  • New York (Population Estimates, July 1, 2015): 19,795,791
    10 – 15 million in population = $602,655
  • Ohio (Population Estimates, July 1, 2015): 11,613,423
    Less than 10 million in population = $402,655
  • Colorado (Population Estimates, July 1, 2015): 5,456,574
  • Iowa (Population Estimates, July 1, 2015): 3,123,899
  • Alabama = (Population Estimates, July 1, 2015): 4,858,979

NUMBER OF AWARDS: Up to five awards.


ELIGIBILITY: Eligibility is limited to the five award recipients—Alabama Administrative Office of Courts, New York State Unified Court System, Colorado Judicial Department, Judicial Branch of Iowa, and Supreme Court of Ohio—under the OJJDP FY 2014 Family Drug Court Statewide System Reform Program (SSRP) solicitation.

TARGET POPULATION: All families in the child welfare system affected by parental substance use disorders.


SUMMARY: OJJDP is seeking to infuse effective family drug court (FDC) practices established at the individual, local level and institutionalize them in the larger state-level child welfare, substance abuse treatment, and court systems. The purpose of this state systems reform effort is to expand the scale (i.e., penetration rate of the larger child welfare and substance abuse treatment systems) and scope (i.e., range of comprehensive services for families) of FDCs to serve all families in the child welfare system affected by parental substance use disorders more effectively and improve child, parent, and family outcomes.

In FY 2014, OJJDP awarded five states under the FDCs SSRP effort to work closely with the Court Improvement Program to develop policies that expand or infuse FDC practices across state systems. The goal is for states to serve more families affected by parental substance use disorders who are involved in the child welfare system. SSRP achieves this goal through enhanced cross-systems collaboration; infusion of effective FDC practices into the larger child welfare, substance use disorder, and/or dependency court systems; and increasing the scale and scope of FDCs across the state.
The first stage of this process involved a 2-year planning and early implementation phase. OJJDP provided the states with intensive technical assistance, facilitated by Children and Family Futures, to develop a systems change plan and initial implementation work. This solicitation supports the implementation of the plan developed by the invited states.


To better address this population of families on a larger scale, FDCs must shift their focus from “project-level” thinking to “systems-level” thinking, which requires innovations that can infuse, embed, or integrate FDC practices into all cases affected by parental substance use disorders in the child welfare system. The purpose of SSRP is to serve all families affected by parental substance use disorders more effectively by increasing collaboration between the child welfare, court, and substance use disorder treatment systems to ensure families have access to a range of comprehensive services that improve child, parent, and family outcomes.

Recent collaborative projects among child welfare, substance use disorder treatment, dependency courts, and other service systems have achieved substantially better family outcomes than systems lacking successful collaborative structures—at times achieving outcomes that are two to three times better than those in standard operations. Key ingredients of improved practice and policy leading to better family outcomes are:

  1. A system of identifying families with substance use disorders.
  2. Earlier access to assessment and appropriate treatment services.
  3. Increased management of recovery services and compliance.
  4. Improved family-centered services and parent-child relationships.
  5. Increased judicial or administrative oversight.
  6. Systemic response for participants—contingency management.
  7. A collaborative nonadversarial approach across service systems and courts.

The goal of this program is for the states to implement reform strategies identified during the planning phase of this statewide initiative. The objective is to have the states increase the capacity of state child welfare, treatment, and court systems to more effectively intervene with parents and families with substance use and/or co-occurring mental health disorders who are involved in the child welfare system as a result of child abuse and neglect issues by:

  • Implementing a full-scale program of practice or policy changes tested in the planning phase.
  • Developing and implementing evaluation and information-sharing systems that measure the impact of the implementation plan, including the allocation and expansion of resources for continuous evaluation so those activities that result in positive change statewide are institutionalized and sustained.
  • Improving family outcomes, including but not limited to decreasing days in out-of-home care, improving reunification outcomes, increasing the number of children who remain home after child welfare involvement, improving treatment outcomes, and decreasing repeat maltreatment and re-entry rates.
  • Developing a marketing plan/approach to disseminate information and lessons learned from the SSRP initiative.

The applicant should describe how it will address the objectives above during the 12-month implementation phase. Additionally, the applicant should explain in the project narrative how the results of this initiative will create a permanent shift in doing business that relies on strengthening relationships across systems and within the community to secure needed resources in order to achieve better results and outcomes for all children and families affected by substance use disorders. The implementation phase will consist of full statewide rollout of strategies to expand or infuse FDC practices into the child welfare, treatment, and court systems to serve all families in the child welfare system affected by parental substance use disorders more effectively and improve child, parent, and family outcomes. Although the Administrative Office of the Court in each state is the applicant and lead agency, the state child welfare agency and state substance use disorder treatment agency are required collaborating partners, and the application must include memoranda of understanding formalizing these partnerships.



Applicants must demonstrate in the application how they will leverage and expand their existing infrastructure to develop a sustainable cross-systems tracking and monitoring system at the state and local levels. Applicants must demonstrate buy-in from child welfare, treatment, and other agencies as appropriate. Efforts will be made to link the OJJDP grants with coordinated grants from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services/Administration for Children and Families/Children’s Bureau, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, and state and local funding.


LINK to RFP: https://www.ojjdp.gov/grants/solicitations/FY2017/FamilyDrugCourtStatewide.pdf

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Office for Victims of Crime (OVC)

Vision 21: Linking Systems of Care for Children and Youth State Demonstration Project

DEADLINE: Applications due: May 11, 2017.

AWARD: Up to $500,000 each, with an estimated total amount awarded of up to $1,000,000. OVC expects to make awards for a 15-month period of performance, to begin on October 1, 2017.

OVC anticipates funding the full implementation of this program over the span of 6 years—Phase 1: Planning (15 months) and Phase 2: Implementation (5 years).

NUMBER OF AWARDS: Up to two awards.

ELIGIBILITY: Eligible applicants are limited to public agencies, state agencies, federally recognized Indian tribal governments, and units of local government. Units of government may partner as co-applicants, when necessary, to achieve the goals of this solicitation; however, a lead agency must be identified.



Lead applicants must partner with a collaborative body/network of stakeholders that includes representatives of state government, victim services, law enforcement, health services (physical, mental, and behavioral), juvenile justice, courts, judges, educators, and other state, tribal, and local entities. Partners should collectively have expertise in victim services (including victim compensation), child and youth victimization, child welfare, juvenile justice, law enforcement, mental health, law (as it pertains to this population), information technology, and other key components identified by the applicant.

While each state may approach these issues somewhat differently, and may engage unique partners, OVC expects that, at a minimum, the following systems are active participants: representatives of state government, victim services, law enforcement, health services (physical, mental, and behavioral), juvenile justice, courts, judges, educators, and other state, tribal, and local entities. Partners should collectively have expertise in victim services (including victim compensation), child and youth victimization, child welfare, juvenile justice, law enforcement, mental health, law (as it pertains to this population), information technology, and other key components identified by the applicant. Based on lessons learned since the demonstration project initially began, it is recommended that stakeholders also include representation from youth and families that have interfaced with these systems; key decisionmakers and individuals/organizations with the ability to make policy and procedural changes; frontline staff who work directly with children and families on a daily basis; representatives from other similar efforts and collaborative bodies (e.g., other systems of care-related efforts, state child welfare improvement projects); state legal partners (e.g., the State’s Attorney’s Office); local legal resources (e.g., local universities; partners with expertise in information technology); and experts on achieving both confidentiality and information flow in the context of multi-system efforts.

TARGET POPULATION: Child and youth victims and their families.


SUMMARY: This solicitation seeks to address the enduring issue of child and youth victimization through state-level demonstration projects. Victimization, left unaddressed, can have serious, long- lasting consequences for children’s physical and mental health. Research demonstrates that trauma left untreated may manifest into a range of physical, emotional, and behavioral problems. We pay for child and youth victimization in many ways: health and mental health care, child welfare, special education, juvenile and criminal justice, and losses in productivity over the individual’s lifespan. Although many systems exist to respond to these various issues, these systems often fail to communicate and collaborate effectively to get to the root of the problem.

Through this solicitation, OVC is seeking state-level demonstration sites that will bring all of the relevant systems and professionals together to establish a coordinated approach. This approach will ensure that every child entering these systems is assessed for victimization, that children and their families are provided comprehensive and coordinated services to fully address their needs, and that practices and policies are established to sustain this approach long-term. The project will be conducted in two phases—Phase 1: Planning (15 months) and Phase 2: Implementation (5 years).

OVC issued a solicitation in 2014 for state-level demonstration projects to bring together all of the relevant systems and professionals to provide early identification, intervention, and treatment for child and youth victims and their families and caregivers. As part of the demonstration project, OVC also funds a technical assistance (TA) provider to provide tailored and ongoing support to the project teams in these complex statewide initiatives, and a concurrent national evaluation funded by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) to identify what approaches work so that future approaches can be based on data and an evidence-based analysis.



Through this FY 2017 competitive solicitation, OVC intends to bring up to two additional state sites into the Linking Systems of Care for Children and Youth program. The inclusion of a second cohort group will expand the effort and deeply enhance the evidence that can be obtained through this demonstration program and concurrent evaluation. This will help to better establish lessons learned that can then be replicated across the Nation.

Consistent with the 2014 solicitation, the demonstration project will be conducted in two phases—Phase 1: Planning (15 months) and Phase 2: Implementation (5 years). During the Phase 1 planning process, participating states will conduct a thorough needs assessment, including working with their collaborative body/network of stakeholders to more fully identify all of the relevant systems and stakeholders; review the existing policies and protocols of the partnering agencies to identify strengths and gaps in services and resources; and determine which agencies should be better linked. Based on these findings, the states will then develop a plan to provide screening and services (and the corresponding training and assistance necessary to achieve this) for child and youth victims across all relevant systems. OVC anticipates the inclusion of innovative, evidence-based methods to accomplish these tasks and to address service gaps. One example of a collaborative approach would be to develop a universal victimization screening tool and requisite response/treatment protocol to screen for multiple types of victimization across systems (no matter if the child/youth presents as a victim, witness, or offender), and then put into place the services necessary to get to the root of the child/youth’s trauma. Using lessons learned from work with the first two state sites, the OVC funded-TA provider will work extensively with participating states throughout Phase 1 to assist with establishing a robust stakeholder network, building capacity of program staff to facilitate collaborative meetings and decision-making processes; and provide effective leadership on this project, providing peer-to-peer learning opportunities, designing and implementing a thorough needs assessment, and developing the strategy.



In Phase 2, participating states will implement the strategy. The OVC funded-TA provider will continue to support the states during their implementation efforts. OVC may allow use of project funds to fill specific service gaps on a temporary basis until the strategy is fully implemented. Refinements to the strategy and its implementation will be made throughout this phase to ensure the methods employed are as successful as possible. Additional funding for Phase 2 will be based on funding availability and grantee performance.

Goals, Objectives, and Deliverables

The goal of this demonstration project is to improve responses to child and youth victims and their families by providing consistent, coordinated responses that address the presenting issues and full range of victim needs.



This goal will be accomplished through the following objectives:

  1. Establish a collaborative body/network of stakeholders. This must consist of all of the relevant systems (e.g., child welfare, juvenile justice, victim services), professionals, community groups, and stakeholders (including families that have interfaced with the systems). It is expected that these child-/youth-/family-serving entities from across the state will convene to develop a plan for collaboration and communication moving forward. It is also expected that there will be meaningful involvement from families and communities so that the project is guided by the needs of victims and survivors.
  2. Conduct a gap analysis/needs assessment. States will work with their stakeholders and an OVC-identified TA provider to more fully identify all of the relevant systems and stakeholders, review and analyze existing policies and protocols of the partnering agencies, and identify strengths and gaps in services and resources. The gap analysis/needs assessment process will allow states to identify strengths, gaps, and areas of improvement (e.g., identification of agencies that should be better linked). Findings from the gap analysis/needs assessment will help formulate each state’s strategy.
  3. Develop a strategy. States will continue to work with their stakeholders and an OVC-identified TA provider to develop a strategy based on the state’s needs and resources. This strategy will also include developing a systematic method to screen for victimization across entities, developing protocols and procedures to ensure children and families receive appropriate services, and delivering staff training to implement and sustain the practice statewide.
  4. Implement the strategy. States will continue to work with their stakeholders and an OVC-identified TA provider to implement the strategy, grow their network as needed, identify and make changes as needed, identify lessons learned to share broadly, and identify how the program will be sustained after OVC grant funding has ended.

LINK to RFP: https://ojp.gov/ovc/grants/pdftxt/FY2017-Linking-Systems-of-Care-508.pdf

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Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

Cooperative Agreements to Implement Zero Suicide in Health Systems (Zero Suicide)

DEADLINE: Applications due: July 18, 2017.

AWARD: Total available funding of $7.9 million ($2 million for tribes and tribal organizations):

  • Up to $700,000 per year for states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. Territories.
  • Up to $400,000 per year for tribes and tribal organizations; community-based primary care or behavioral health care organizations; emergency departments; and local public health agencies.

For up to five years.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: Up to 13 awards.

ELIGIBILITY: States, the District of Columbia, or U.S. Territories health agencies with mental and/or behavioral health functions; an Indian tribe or tribal organization; community-based primary care or behavioral health care organizations; emergency departments; local public health agencies.

TARGET POPULATION: Individuals who are 25 years of age or older at risk for suicide.

SUMMARY: The Zero Suicide model is a comprehensive, multi-setting approach to suicide prevention in health systems. The purpose of this program is to implement suicide prevention and intervention programs, for individuals who are 25 years of age or older, that are designed to raise awareness of suicide, establish referral processes, and improve care and outcomes for such individuals who are at risk for suicide. Grantees will implement the Zero Suicide model throughout their health system. Health systems that do not provide direct care services may partner with agencies that can implement the Zero Suicide model. For communities without well-developed behavioral health care services, the Zero Suicide model may be implemented in Federally Qualified Health Centers or other primary care settings.

The Zero Suicide model has seven essential elements of suicide care:

  • Lead – Create a leadership-driven, safety-oriented culture committed to dramatically reducing suicide among people under care. Include survivors of suicide attempts and suicide loss in leadership and planning roles;
  • Train – Develop a competent, confident, and caring workforce;
  • Identify – Systematically identify and assess suicide risk among people receiving care;
  • Engage – Ensure every individual has a pathway to care that is both timely and adequate to meet his or her needs. Include collaborative safety planning and restriction of lethal means;
  • Treat – Use effective, evidence-based treatments that directly target suicidal thoughts and behaviors;
  • Transition – Provide continuous contact and support, especially after acute care; and
  • Improve – Apply a data-driven, quality improvement approach to inform system changes that will lead to improved patient outcomes and better care for those at risk.

By addressing all elements of the Zero Suicide model, health care providers will transform their health system to one that is ready to identify, treat, refer, and ensure continuity of care for individuals at risk for suicide and suicidal behaviors.

Required Activities:

You must use SAMHSA’s services grant funds primarily to support direct services. This includes the following activities:

  • Screen all individuals receiving care for suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Conduct a comprehensive risk assessment of individuals identified at risk for suicide, and ensure reassessment as appropriate.
  • Implement effective, evidence-based treatments that specifically treat suicidal ideation and behaviors. Clinical staff must be trained to provide direct treatment in suicide prevention and evaluate individual outcomes throughout the treatment process.
  • Transform health systems to include a leadership-driven, safety-oriented culture committed to dramatically reducing suicide among people under care, and to accept and embed the Zero Suicide model within their agencies.
  • Train the health care workforce in suicide prevention evidence-based, best-practice services relevant to their position, including the identification, assessment, management and treatment, and evaluation of individuals throughout the overall process.
  • Ensure that the most appropriate, least restrictive treatment and support is provided, including brief intervention and follow-up from crisis, respite and residential care, and partial or full hospitalization.
  • Develop a Suicide Care Management Plan for every individual identified as at-risk of suicide and continuously monitor the individual’s progress through their electronic health record (EHR) or other data management system, and adjust treatment as necessary. The Suicide Care Management Plan must include the following:
    • Protocols for safety planning and reducing access to lethal means;
    • Rapid follow-up of adults who have attempted suicide or experienced a suicidal crisis after being discharged from a treatment facility e.g., local emergency departments, inpatient psychiatric facilities, including direct linkage with appropriate health care agencies to ensure coordinated care services are in place.
    • Protocols to ensure client safety, especially among high-risk adults in healthcare systems who have attempted suicide, experienced a suicidal crisis, and/or have a serious mental illness. This must include outreach telephone contact within 24 to 48 hours after discharge and securing an appointment within 1 week of discharge.
  • Work with Veterans Health Administration (VHA) and community-based outpatient clinics, state department of veteran affairs, and national SAMHSA and Veterans Administration (VA) suicide prevention resources to engage and intervene with veterans at risk for suicide but not currently receiving VA services. This includes veterans contacting local Lifeline crisis centers, sub-acute crisis services, and community emergency departments.
  • Develop and implement a plan that assures attention to preventing suicide among those receiving treatment for serious mental illness (SMI), such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, and for services designed for those with SMI, such as assertive community treatment and assisted outpatient treatment.
  • For State applicants, ensure that at least 70 percent of the Suicide Prevention Lifeline calls are answered by a Suicide Prevention Lifeline Crisis center within the state from which the call originated, excluding callers who press “1” to be connected to the Veterans Crisis Line.
  • Ensure feedback and leadership of survivors of suicide attempts and suicide loss are involved in all required activities.

LINK to RFP: https://www.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/grants/pdf/sm-17-006.pdf

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Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

State Pilot Grant Program for Treatment for Pregnant and Postpartum Women (PPW-PLT)

DEADLINE: Applications due: July 3, 2017.

AWARD: Anticipated total funding of $3,300,000 with awards of up to $1,100,000 for up to three years.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: Three awards.

ELIGIBILITY: Eligible applicants are Single State Agencies (SSAs) for Substance Abuse.

TARGET POPULATION: Pregnant and postpartum women with a primary diagnosis of a substance use disorder, including opioid disorders.

SUMMARY: The purpose of the program is to enhance flexibility in the use of funds designed to: 1) support family-based services for pregnant and postpartum women with a primary diagnosis of a substance use disorder, including opioid disorders; 2) help state substance abuse agencies address the continuum of care, including services provided to women in nonresidential-based settings; and 3) promote a coordinated, effective and efficient state system managed by state substance abuse agencies by encouraging new approaches and models of service delivery.

As a result of this program, SAMHSA seeks to: 1) reduce the abuse of alcohol and other drugs; 2) increase engagement in treatment services; 3) increase retention in the appropriate level and duration of services; and 4) increase access to the use of medications approved by the Food and Drug Administration in combination with counseling for the treatment of drug addiction.



Family-Based Services for Pregnant and Postpartum Women

  • Facilitate the availability of family-based treatment and recovery support services. This includes the provision of services for pregnant and postpartum women, their minor children, age 17 and under, and other family member of the women and children as deemed necessary. Note: Grantees must use a minimum of 75 percent of grant funds for services; if a grantee elects to provide residential based services then no more than 15 percent of these funds may be used for residential treatment. Services may be directly provided by the grantee, purchased through grants/contract(s) with other providers, or made available through memoranda of understanding or agreement (MOUs/MOAs) with other providers. The CSAT Center Director convened and solicited recommendations from various stakeholders including SSAs, providers, and people in recovery on the essential services that should be delivered to support a family-centered treatment approach to this population. Based on this input, the following core services were identified:
    • Outreach, engagement, screening, and assessment;
    • “Wrap-around”/recovery support services (e.g., child care, vocational, educational, and transportation services) designed to improve access and retention in services. [Note: Grant funds may be used to purchase such services from another provider].
  • Family-focused programs to support family strengthening and reunification, including parenting education and evidence-based interventions and social and recreational activities;
  • Clinically appropriate evidence-based practices (EBPs) for treatment of persons with a primary diagnosis of SUDs including opioid use disorders, particularly, the use of medication assisted treatment (MAT), i.e., the use of FDA-approved medications (e.g., methadone, buprenorphine products including buprenorphine/naloxone combination formulations and buprenorphine monoproduct formulations, naltrexone products including extended-release and oral formulations or implantable buprenorphine) in combination with psychosocial interventions (e.g., counseling). For more information on MAT: https://www.samhsa.gov/medication-assisted-treatment.
  • Mental health care that includes a trauma-informed system of assessments, interventions, and social-emotional skill building services; and
  • Case management.
  • Promote effective and efficient coordination and delivery of services across multiple systems and providers (e.g., behavioral health, primary care, housing, child and family services).

State Infrastructure Development

  • Develop a needs assessment using statewide epidemiological data (where available if a needs assessment effort is already in place, work with the local, state, or tribal epidemiological outcomes workgroup to enhance and supplement the current process and its findings). The needs assessment should identify gaps in services furnished to pregnant and postpartum women along the continuum of care with a primary diagnosis of a substance use disorder, including opioid use disorders.
  • Develop and implement a state strategic plan or enhance an existing plan to ensure sustained partnerships across public health and other systems that will result in short- and long-term strategies to support family-based treatment services along the continuum of care for pregnant and postpartum women. The elements of the implementation plan include but are not limited to: identifying geographic and population specific areas of high need, service gaps, resources, goals, strategies and activities including policy change, infrastructure development, and program/service development.

LINK to RFP: https://www.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/grants/pdf/ti-17-016.pdf

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Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act: Building Communities of Recovery (BCOR)

DEADLINE: Applications due: July 3, 2017.

AWARD: Anticipated total funding of $2,600,000 with awards of up to $200,000 per year for up to three years.

Non-federal matching funds are required and may be in cash or in-kind. The matching funds must not be less than $1 for each $1 of federal funds provided in all years of the grant.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: 13 awards.

ELIGIBILITY: Recovery Community Organizations (RCOs) that are domestic, private nonprofit entities in states, territories, or tribes. RCOs are independent, non-profit organizations led and governed by representatives of local communities of recovery. To ensure that recovery communities are fully represented, only organizations controlled and managed by members of the addiction recovery community are eligible to apply. In addition, if an applicant applies for both the RCSP and BCOR programs and both applications are determined to be in the fundable range, the application with the higher score will be awarded. The organization submitting the application must have served as a domestic non-profit RCO for a minimum of two years.

TARGET POPULATION: People in recovery from substance abuse and addiction.

SUMMARY: The purpose of this program is to mobilize resources within and outside of the recovery community to increase the prevalence and quality of long-term recovery support from substance abuse and addiction. These grants are intended to support the development, enhancement, expansion, and delivery of recovery support services (RSS) as well as promotion of and education about recovery. Programs will be principally governed by people in recovery from substance abuse and addiction who reflect the community served.

SAMHSA recognizes the essential role of recovery support for persons with substance abuse and addiction in order for them to maintain their overall health and wellness. SAMHSA recognizes all pathways to recovery including abstinence attained with FDA-approved medications (e.g., methadone, buprenorphine products including buprenorphine/naloxone combination formulations and buprenorphine mono-product formulations, naltrexone products including extended-release and oral formulations, disulfiram, and acamprosate calcium). Participation in evidence based clinical treatment services produces the best recovery outcomes when paired with robust recovery supports. SAMHSA expects to improve long term recovery for persons with substance abuse and addiction through the provision of individualized recovery supports and sustained support for recovery-focused community efforts. The latter is achieved by building connections between recovery networks, between Recovery Community Organizations (RCOs), and with other RSS, as well as by conducting public education and outreach on issues relating to drug/alcohol addiction and recovery.

Grantees may use funds to: 1) build connections between recovery networks, between RCOs, and with other RSS; 2) reduce the stigma associated with drug/alcohol addiction; and 3) conduct public education and outreach on issues relating to drug/alcohol addiction and recovery.

Required Activities:

You must use BCOR funds to primarily develop, expand, and enhance community and statewide RSS, including:

  • Peer Recovery Support Services (PRSS), designed and delivered by people who have experienced both drug/alcohol addiction and recovery. Since PRSS are designed and delivered by peers who have been successful in the recovery process, they embody a powerful message of hope, as well as a wealth of experiential knowledge. The services can effectively extend the reach of treatment beyond the clinical setting into the everyday environment of those seeking to achieve or sustain recovery.
  • RSS, defined as non-clinical services that directly assists individuals and families to recover from alcohol or drug problems. They include social support, linkage to allied service providers (i.e. TANF, Medicaid), and a full range of human services that facilitate recovery and wellness contributing to an improved quality of life (e.g., housing linkages, child care, vocational, educational, legal, and transportation services, etc.). These services may be provided prior to, during, and after treatment.

Allowable Activities:

  • Build connections through infrastructure building between recovery networks, between RCOs, and with other RSS, including:
    • substance use and/or mental disorder treatment programs and systems;
    • primary care providers and physicians;
    • the criminal justice system;
    • employers;
    • housing services;
    • child welfare agencies; and
    • other RSS that facilitate recovery from addiction.
  • Activities designed to reduce discrimination and/or negative attitudes against people with addiction and in recovery from drug/alcohol addiction.
  • Conduct public education, training (including addiction peer recovery coach training), and outreach on issues relating to drug/alcohol addiction and recovery, including:
    • identifying the signs of drug/alcohol addiction;
    • the resources that are available for individuals struggling with drug/alcohol addiction;
    • the resources that are available to help support individuals in recovery;
    • information on the medical consequences of addiction, including neonatal abstinence syndrome among infants exposed to opioids during pregnancy and potential infection with human immunodeficiency virus and viral hepatitis;
    • identification or development of resources available to individuals struggling with drug/alcohol addiction and to families with a family member struggling with, or being treated for drug/alcohol addiction, including programs that mentor and provide support services to children; and
    • promoting other activities that strengthen the network of community support for individuals in recovery.

LINK to RFP: https://www.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/grants/pdf/ti-17-015.pdf

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Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

Resiliency in Communities After Stress and Trauma (ReCAST Program)

DEADLINE: Applications due: May 17, 2017.

AWARD: Anticipated total funding of $2,500,000 with awards of up to $1,000,000 per year for up to five years.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: Up to two awards.

ELIGIBILITY: Local municipalities (e.g., counties, cities, and local governments) in partnership with community-based organizations that have faced civil unrest within the past 24 months from the posting of this FOA.

TARGET POPULATION: High-risk youth and families in communities that have experienced civil unrest within the past 24 months.

SUMMARY: The purpose of this program is to assist high-risk youth and families and promote resilience and equity in communities that have recently faced civil unrest through implementation of evidence-based, violence prevention, and community youth engagement programs, as well as linkages to trauma-informed behavioral health services. The goal of the ReCAST Program is for local community entities to work together in ways that lead to improved behavioral health, empowered community residents, reductions in trauma, and sustained community change.

For the purposes of this FOA, civil unrest is defined as demonstrations of mass protest and mobilization, community harm, and disruption through violence often connected with law enforcement issues. Communities that have experienced civil unrest share similar characteristics:

  • Barriers to access and lack of social services, health care, legal and political representation, housing, employment, and education;
  • Current and historic strains in community and public sector relationships, e.g., law enforcement, school, health, and/or housing and community relationships; and
  • Racial/ethnic minority and marginalized populations with experiences of poverty and inequality.

SAMHSA expects the ReCAST Program to be guided by a community-coalition of residents and community-based; non-profit organizations in partnership with such entities as health and human services providers, schools, and institutions of higher education; faith-based organizations; businesses, state and local government entities, and law enforcement; and employment, housing, and transportation services agencies.

The overall goal of the ReCAST Program is to provide communities that have experienced civil unrest within the past 24 months from the posting of this FOA, with equitable access to resources and services to ensure that high-risk youth and their families benefit from evidence-based violence prevention, community youth engagement efforts, and linkages to trauma-informed behavioral health services to strengthen the integration of behavioral health services and other community systems, and to build resilient and trauma-informed communities. Program goals include the following:

  • Building a foundation to promote well-being, resiliency, and community healing through community-based, participatory approaches3;
  • Creating more equitable access to trauma-informed community behavioral health resources;
  • Strengthening the integration of behavioral health services and other community systems to address the social determinants of health, recognizing that factors, such as law enforcement practices, transportation, employment, and housing policies, can contribute to health outcomes;
  • Creating community change through community-based, participatory approaches that promote community and youth engagement, leadership development, improved governance, and capacity building; and
  • Ensuring that program services are culturally specific and developmentally appropriate.

SAMHSA will prioritize funding grants from communities that have formed partnerships between key stakeholders including state and local governments (including multiple cities and counties if impacted); public or private universities and colleges; and non-profit community and faith- based organizations. Applicants must provide a signed Statement of Assurance identifying key partners with whom established partnerships exist.

The proposed project must include the following activities:

  • Convene and engage a diverse coalition of stakeholders in the community, including LEAs, community leaders/members, family/youth representatives, local public agencies (e.g., behavioral health, law enforcement, health and human services providers, and other child, family, and community-serving providers) and other local partners (e.g., clergy and faith-based organizations, businesses, public or private universities or colleges, and non-profit organizations) to provide guidance and leadership on all grant activities.
  • Identify a 1.0 Full-time Equivalent (FTE) Program Manager to lead, manage, and coordinate all grant activities.
  • Within three months of the grant award, conduct a Community Needs and Resources Assessment. The community needs and resources assessment is intended to be a planned and purposeful process of gathering, analyzing, and reporting current data and information about the characteristics, needs, and resources of the community in which the proposed activities will be implemented and, in particular, the needs of high-risk youth and their families. The assessment should involve community members and focus on community-identified drivers of civil unrest, trauma, and violence. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Community Health Assessment and Group Evaluation (CHANGE) tool is one example of a community needs and resource assessment plan. See the tool at: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dch/programs/healthycommunitiesprogram/tools/change/pdf/changeactionguide.pdf.
  • Within six months of the grant award, develop and implement a community strategic plan that outlines a common vision to address the goals of the program and builds partnerships and awareness of the issues faced by high-risk youth and their families. A strategic plan can include a diverse array of activities, such as developing a set of core principles and values that reflect a community-based participatory partnership.
  • Identify and implement trauma-informed behavioral health services (e.g., Preventing Long-term Anger and Aggression in Youth of Color, Strengthening Black Families); evidence-based violence prevention and community engagement programs; and other culturally specific and developmentally appropriate strategies that address the needs of high-risk youth, families, and community members and that build community resilience.
  • Provide training in trauma-informed approaches to first responders, educators, clergy, and health and human services providers to increase their ability to assist children, adolescents, adults, and all community members in the aftermath of civil unrest events.
  • Provide peer support activities for high risk youth and families, such as support group facilitation, peer counseling, mentoring, goal setting, linking to resources, and supporting the development of self-advocacy and empowerment provided by Peer Supporters who have lived experience receiving mental health and substance abuse services.

SAMHSA’s ReCAST Program grants will also support the following types of activities:

  • Coordinate with housing and employment programs (e.g., Youth Build and Workforce Investment Act).
  • Provide Mental Health First Aid, Youth Mental Health First Aid, and/or other mental health literacy trainings for first responders (e.g., police, firefighters, emergency services staff), school personnel, clergy, parents, health and human services providers, and other child, family, and community-serving providers.
  • Provide cultural competency and implicit bias reduction training to educators, first responders, and other community service providers to increase awareness and acknowledgement of differences in language, age, culture, socio-economic status, political and religious beliefs, sexual orientation and gender identity, and life experiences.
  • Provide activities that address behavioral health disparities and the social determinants of health.
  • Provide trainings for law enforcement that focus on increasing positive police-community relationships.
  • Provide self-care activities for first responders, educators, and health and human services providers to reduce secondary traumatic stress known as compassion fatigue.
  • Provide workforce training in behavioral health aspects related to disaster recovery and crisis response for mental health professionals, disaster recovery workers, and law enforcement, (e.g., Skills for Psychological Recovery, Psychological First Aid, and Crisis Intervention Team).
  • Provide individual and group counseling for grief and loss to support children and adolescents and other family members.

LINK to RFP: https://www.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/grants/pdf/sm-17-009.pdf

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Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)

Promoting Integration of Primary and Behavioral Health Care (PIPBHC)

DEADLINE: Applications due: May 17, 2017.

AWARD: Anticipated total funding of $22,612,000 with awards of up to $2,000,000 per year for up to five years.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: Up to 11 awards.

ELIGIBILITY: States, or appropriate state agency, in collaboration with:

  • One or more qualified community programs, as described under section 1913(b)(1) of the Public Health Service Act (PHS); or
  • One or more community health centers as described in section 330 of the PHS Act.

In order to promote full (or bi-directional) integration and collaboration in clinical practices between primary and behavioral health care, please note the following:

  • If the selected provider organization is a qualified, community health program as described in section 1913(b)(1) of the PHS Act, then a formal partnership with a community health center as described in section 330 of the PHS Act will be required to provide the integration of primary care services into the behavioral health setting.
  • If the selected provider organization is a community health center as described in section 330 of the PHS Act, then a formal partnership with a qualified, community health program as described in section 1913(b)(1) of the PHS Act will be required to provide integration of behavioral health services into the primary care setting.

TARGET POPULATION: Activities will be provided to one or more of the following special populations:

  • Adults with a mental illness who have co-occurring physical health conditions or chronic diseases; or
  • Adults with a serious mental illness who have co-occurring physical health conditions or chronic diseases; or
  • Children and adolescents with a serious emotional disturbance with co-occurring physical health conditions or chronic diseases; or
  • Individuals with a substance use disorder.

SUMMARY: The purpose of this cooperative agreement is to: (1) promote full integration and collaboration in clinical practice between primary and behavioral healthcare; (2) support the improvement of integrated care models for primary care and behavioral health care to improve the overall wellness and physical health status of adults with a serious mental illness (SMI) or children with a serious emotional disturbance (SED); and (3) promote and offer integrated care services related to screening, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental and substance use disorders, and co-occurring physical health conditions and chronic diseases. SAMHSA expects that a continuum of prevention, treatment and recovery support services will be offered to consumers within the PIPBHC grant program.

SAMHSA expects States or the appropriate State agency, in collaboration with one or more qualified community programs or, one or more community health centers, to provide the following three core requirements:

  • Promote full integration and collaboration in clinical practices between primary and behavioral health care.
  • Support the improvement of integrated care models for primary care and behavioral health care to improve the overall wellness and physical health status of adults with a serious mental illness or children with a serious emotional disturbance.
  • Promote integrated care services related to screening, diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of mental and substance use disorders, and co-occurring physical health conditions and chronic diseases.

Applicants must select qualified community programs or community health centers that serve an area or population(s) of high need. Applicants must also identify the number of behavioral health or health provider organizations that will be involved and indicate which one or more of the four special populations will receive integrated care services.



The state or appropriate state agency receiving funding under this grant may not allocate more than 10 percent of the total grant award for administrative costs at the state level. The remaining 90 percent of funds must be allocated to a community program(s) or community health center(s) to provide direct integrated care. Of the remaining 90 percent of funding, no more than 10 percent may be allocated for evaluation/performance assessment/data collection, and no more than 15 percent may be allocated for infrastructure development.



You must use SAMHSA’s services grant funds primarily to support direct services, including the following activities:

State Grantee Requirements

  • Develop a plan to achieve fully collaborative agreements to provide services to special populations.
    • This plan must identify the selected provider organizations (i.e., behavioral health or health facilities) that will provide integrated care and a justification for the amount of funding requested for the services provided as related to selected special populations to be served. Differentiating the types of services that will use grant funds must also be indicated. For example, a community health center that already provides primary care services would likely use PIPBHC grant funds for behavioral health services. A community behavioral health center that already provides mental health and substance use services would likely use PIPBHC grant funds to provide primary care services.
    • Provider organizations shall be located among communities of high need, including federally recognized tribes; an Urban Indian organization; tribal organizations, tribally operated clinics, urban health clinics, or a HRSA-designated health professional shortage area (HPSA). It is encouraged that provider organizations be located in geographically diverse regions of the state in order to increase equitable access to treatment and recovery support services for the population(s) of focus. Partnering with non-profit, faith-based, adolescent and/or transitional aged youth, substance use treatment provider agencies, federally qualified health centers, school-based health centers, primary health care, education, or other agencies serving the population of focus is recommended.
  • Applicants must identify those consumers most in need of integrated services (including those with HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis A, B, and C, as well as those with histories of trauma). Individuals who have or are at risk of developing chronic physical conditions are eligible to participate in the PIPBHC program. In order to support the goals of PIPBHC, it is important these services are long-term in nature and not time-limited.
  • Develop a document that summarizes the policies, if any, that serve as barriers to the provision of integrated care, and the specific steps, if applicable, that will be taken to address such barriers;
  • Describe the partnerships or other arrangements with local health care providers (e.g., community behavioral health centers, health centers, school-based health centers, substance use treatment facilities) that will provide services to the selected special populations.

Selected Provider Organization Requirements – Note: If you are a qualified community health program, you are required to partner with a community health center (as defined in section 330 of the PHS) to provide integrated primary care services. If you are a community health center (as defined in section 330 of the PHS), you are required to partner with a qualified community health program (under section 1913(b)(1) of the PHS) to provide integrated behavioral health services.

  • Provide outreach and other engagement and retention strategies to increase participation in, and access to primary care and behavioral health treatment and prevention services for diverse populations. NOTE: If only outreach and other strategies to increase access are provided, the provider organization must identify that treatment services are available and that the organization has the ability to connect individuals with those services.
  • Provide direct primary care and behavioral health treatment (including screening, assessment, and care management) and prevention services for diverse special populations at risk.
  • Screen and assess clients for the presence of co-occurring chronic physical conditions; mental and substance use disorders for adults with serious mental illness; mental illness; children and adolescents with serious emotional disturbance; and individuals with a substance use disorder. The information obtained from the screening and assessment should be used to develop appropriate treatment approaches with the persons identified as having such co-occurring physical health conditions and chronic diseases.
  • Identify the evidence-based or promising practices integrated care model(s) for primary care and behavioral health. This can include tele-health/behavioral health services and culturally appropriate or adapted models for disparate populations, such as rural/frontier communities, Alaskan Native/ American Indians, African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, Asian Americans, and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Questioning (LGBTQ) populations.
  • Develop a plan for the implementation of services for the identified special population. The plan must include descriptions of the integrated services that will be provided, the roles of the integrated care team and how they relate to the service provision, and the expected impact on the physical and behavioral health outcomes of the individuals served by the grant.
  • Achieve Modified Stage 2 Program Requirements for Providers and Hospitals, as defined by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), by the end of the grant. To that end, organizations must develop and demonstrate the ability to meet the Modified Stage 2 Objectives and Measures for 2017 post award of the grant. Providers and hospitals will be required to attest to a single set of objectives and measures. More information can be found here https://www.cms.gov/Regulations-and-Guidance/Legislation/EHRIncentivePrograms/Downloads/TableofContents_EP_Medicaid_ModifiedStage2.pdf. Provider organizations should have an electronic health record (EHR) that meets Meaningful Use Stage 2 in order to ensure the capability of meeting the required reporting of the functional outcomes for this grant. Further, service provider organization(s) must demonstrate that they have the appropriate consent regarding the sharing of information.
  • Provide all of the following components of person-centered, integrated care services:
    • Care coordination including comprehensive care management and comprehensive transitional care from inpatient to other settings, including appropriate follow-up.
    • Shared decision-making
    • Health promotion
    • Individual and family support
    • Referral to community and social support services, including appropriate follow-up
  • Implement tobacco cessation, nutrition/exercise interventions, recovery and prevention of substance use disorders, in addition to other health and behavioral health promotion programs (e.g., wellness consultation, health education and literacy, independent living skills, sleep hygiene, prevention and recovery, and illness, stress, anger and self-management programs, etc.) for the special populations. These programs and the formulation of the integrated person-centered care plan for each individual receiving PIPBHC services need to include peer support, peer leaders and incorporate recovery principles. SAMHSA expects that grantees involve peers in the development and implementation of these services.

Allowable Activities:

Due to the breadth and scope of the project, it may be helpful to consider the following activities:

  • Collaborate and partner with the State Community Mental Health and Substance Abuse Block Grant programs, State Medicaid offices, state health departments, and children and health agencies.
  • Work with the State Medicaid office on the CMS-recognized Collaborative Care Codes to determine how they may align to support sustainability of integrated care services.
  • If the service provider organization is a qualified community health program, then you must partner with a community health center. Consider utilizing the HRSA data warehouse and Universal Data System (UDS) on locating health centers and safety-net providers, as well as the health outcomes and requirements already collected in these programs. Although designated look-alike health centers do not qualify under section 330 of the PHS Act, they can still be a community partner to expand integration services.
  • If serving children with SED, determine the state-level SAMHSA-funded Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services for Children and their Families Program (Children’s Mental Health Initiative, or CMHI) grantee and HRSA’s Title V Maternal and Child Health Services block grant program to establish a formal collaborative relationship. This will allow for the leverage of federal resources and promote comprehensive, integrated services for adolescents and/or transitional aged youth with SUD and co-occurring substance use and mental disorders.

LINK to RFP: https://www.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/grants/pdf/sm-17-008.pdf

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