Below are recent RFPs and funding opportunities.  Please click on any of the titles to find the details of the funding application.  For recent news in the field, please click here.

If you are interested in applying for a federal grant, and seek assistance in writing an innovative and competitive narrative, consider using SAE to help develop the narrative of your application. Also, an important notice that all applicants must have updated DUNS number and SAM registration when applying through Grants.gov. If this process is new to you, please start it immediately, as it can take up to two weeks to obtain each of these. For instructions on how to obtain a DUNS number and SAM registration, go to grants.gov's Organization Registration page.

Current Requests for Proposals


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Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA)
A National Training and Technical Assistance Initiative to Improve Police-Based Responses to People with Mental Health Disorders and Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities


DEADLINE: Applications due: August 22, 2017.

AWARD: BJA expects to make up to one award with an estimated total amount awarded of up to $2.5 million for a 12-month period of performance, to begin on October 1, 2017.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: One award.

ELIGIBILITY: Eligible applicants are public or private organizations, nonprofit and for-profit organizations (including tribal nonprofit and for-profit organizations), and public universities and colleges (including tribal institutions of higher education). For-profit organizations (as well as other recipients) must forgo any profit or management fee.

It is expected that the successful applicant will have significant experience with collaboration between police/law enforcement and MHD and IDD service delivery systems, either through demonstrated experience and expertise of existing or proposed staff or through proposed partnership(s) between organizations. A competitive application must also include representation from groups representing consumers of MHD and IDD services as well as their family members.

Competitive applicants will demonstrate experience with providing training and technical assistance (TTA) to police/law enforcement agencies and organizations that serve people with mental health disorders, co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders, and people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

This demonstrated expertise should include delivering and managing strategic planning services and training to police agencies, as well as experience funding and delivering services to people with mental health disorders, co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders, and intellectual and developmental disabilities. In particular, the applicant must have demonstrated past experience in working with state and or local governments, police and mental health systems, organizations for people with intellectual disabilities/developmental disabilities, criminal justice systems and an understanding of such systems and organizations, their operation, organizational structure, culture, and environment.

TARGET POPULATION: People with MHD and IDD who come in contact with police.

SUMMARY: To support police and law enforcement agencies and their MHD and IDD service delivery partners to build capacity to improve their collaborative responses, BJA will support a National Training and Technical Assistance Center to Improve Police-Based Responses to People with MHD and IDD (National Center). The National Center will assist BJA to coordinate and build upon existing assets and resources described above to serve police agencies and their mental health and social service partners. Many of the resources that BJA offers can be adapted and maximized with specific training and technical assistance for implementation. Without TTA, agencies must implement resources in the community without specific guidance, planning, assessment, contextualization, and knowledge about best practices for implementation.

The goal of the National Center is to build state, local, and tribal governments’ capacity to develop, implement, sustain, track, and assist police and law enforcement in having effective responses to people with MHD and IDD. In addition to fostering more effective collaboration, the Centers work will support public and officer safety.

BJA is seeking to fund a national TTA provider with demonstrated ability to build and enhance police and mental health system and responder capacity to improve law enforcement responses and outcomes for people with MHD and IDD.

This provider must demonstrate the ability to work swiftly, at a high level, and strategically to address the needs of the field. A successful applicant will provide a robust list of subject matter experts and demonstrate the ability to locate other subject matter experts as the need arises. In addition to general law enforcement expertise, the applicant should ensure that it has or can access prosecutorial expertise to support a truly collaborative approach to this problem.

With guidance from BJA the provider will:

Objective 1: Develop and manage a TTA delivery system to build capacity among police and partner MHD and IDD service delivery systems to improve responses to and outcomes for people with MHD and IDD. Based on a robust assessment phase, assist departments in identifying strengths and opportunities that will create the foundation of a program implementation strategy.

Deliverables:

  • Develop and execute a protocol to assess a jurisdiction’s current police response to people with MHD and IDD, including strength of existing partnership with MHD and IDD service delivery systems. The grantee will be expected to incorporate and build upon existing BJA tools to determine the current strength and capacity of the existing police/MHD and IDD strategies to include: review of existing policy and practice, documentation of collaboration, strength of information sharing and data collection, and ability to track outcomes.
  • Use the PMHC Toolkit to market and receive requests for services.
  • Develop a process to triage jurisdictions and provide appropriate resources to meet their needs based on the result of assessment outcomes, including swift, customized, and strategic technical assistance, to include onsite support when appropriate.
  • Assist communities to identify gaps in MHD and IDD service availability and treatment capacity to meet the needs of the subset of this population that comes into contact with police and law enforcement agencies.
  • Identify and expose TTA sites to best practices and provide technical expertise to plan and map a strategy; determine prerequisite steps and prioritize needs and strategies to overcome challenges as identified together by the local/state/tribal partner’s police, MHD and IDD partners.
  • Establish goals and evaluate performance of comprehensive response plans, including follow-up with jurisdictions on progress toward implementing TTA recommendations.
Objective 2: Develop Police/Law Enforcement/Prosecutor MHD and IDD champions to serve as TTA consultants to triaged jurisdictions, and to provide accurate and comprehensive information in response to state, local, and tribal requests. This “on demand” service will ensure BJA has the requisite expertise on hand to respond to field requests for the best information and strategies surrounding Police/Law Enforcement MHD-IDD initiatives.

Deliverables:
  • Provide on-demand TTA for agencies contacting the National Center for specific TTA needs related to improving police-based responses to people with MHD and IDD.
  • Meet and collaborate with BJA and others to enhance resources and knowledge, and leverage the respective expertise of partners in responding to the needs of the field.
  • Engage and broker nationally recognized speakers with expert knowledge as it relates to responding to people with MHD and IDD.
  • Upon BJA’s recommendation and approval, the TTA provider will meet with or coordinate with nationally recognized authors, academics, police executives, MHD and IDD professionals, advocacy professionals, and people with MHD/IDD, their family members, and others to form an expert and deployable speakers’ bureau.
Objective 3: Develop and pilot a Police/Law Enforcement Executives Curriculum that increases executive leadership’s involvement to apply their knowledge and understanding of responding to people with MHD/IDD and administrating agency impact with and without a PMHC.

Deliverables:
  • Create and execute a leadership training and problem-solving curriculum for police executive leadership that promotes evidence-based practice, skill development, and improved management of comprehensive community strategies to respond to people with MHD and IDD. Address topic areas specific to police executive leadership such as how to:
    • Plan for a problem-solving discussion with police leadership that considers challenges external to the agency and administrative challenges that are internal to the agency. Through leadership input, develop outcomes to address identified challenges.
    • Plan for ongoing leadership commitment and sustainment of a comprehensive strategy to respond to people with MHD and IDD.
    • Develop lasting partnerships with leadership and MHD and IDD service delivery systems.
    • Plan a process to routinely track agency performance using data on key measures.
    • Design policies and procedures that incorporate warm hand offs to MHD and IDD service delivery systems and alternatives to arrest when appropriate.
    • Identify, develop, and sustain the most appropriate training and education for all relevant personnel.
    • Gather and maintain inventories of behavioral health resources, processes utilized across law enforcement and behavioral health agencies, and needs assessments.
    • Plan for prioritizing funding to address identified needs, reducing treatment gaps, and improving coordination between community partners.
  • Develop specific tools and reference material for supervisors, middle management officers, and other community leaders that act as co-responders in crisis situations such as behavioral health, fire departments, and emergency management services.
Objective 4: Plan and host a national convening of innovators and leaders in the field to share and build knowledge about what is promising and working to lessen and improve police/law enforcement/prosecutor contact with people with MHD and IDD and develop a communications strategy for information sharing between justice leaders/practitioners and MHD and IDD service delivery partners at the state, local, and tribal level.

Deliverables:
  • Convene a meeting of leaders and innovators, including representatives from jurisdictions with unique technology solutions to identify multisystem frequent users, match available services to people in need, and appropriate for assessment/diversion.
  • Develop a mechanism to identify innovations, and where appropriate educate about and scale up promising approaches to improved safety, increased access to MHD and IDD services, decreased repeat encounters with police/law enforcement, reduced costs, and improved community relations.
  • Drive technology solutions for information sharing between MHD and IDD service delivery system providers, police/law enforcement, emergency services, and jails to better communicate important real time data.
Objective 5: Develop, in partnership with BJA and other federal agencies as relevant, a research agenda that considers the current research base, identifies gaps in knowledge, and lays out and prioritizes scalable research/evaluation options. The plan should consider what works to solidify partnerships between police/law enforcement and MHD and IDD service delivery systems, PMHC training programs (considerations should include who gets trained, when they are trained, how training is delivered, length of training, and necessity/frequency of booster training), officer peer supports, implementation science, and information/data sharing.

Deliverables:
  • Convene multidisciplinary researchers and practitioners to consider and design a research agenda.
  • Identify research gaps and data that is needed to make informed decisions at the state, county, and local level.
  • Build researcher capacity to serve as partners in action research models that assess and provide collaborative police/law enforcement and MHD and IDD service delivery system partners with close to real time feedback on implementation and results and drive solutions for course corrections when necessary.
  • Consult with researchers to use evidence-based strategies, collect data, and assess needs in order to provide fidelity to strategic plans for improving the collaboration of the criminal justice system with local, county, and state health systems in response to people with MHD and IDD.
  • Complete a research agenda that examines model approaches to responding to people with MHD and IDD such as CIT, Co-responder teams, Mobile Crisis teams, and Tailored/Customized approaches. Develop a research proposal that considers as goals:
  • Improved Safety
  • Increased Access to Behavioral Healthcare
  • Decreased Repeat Encounters with the Criminal Justice System
  • Reduced Costs
  • Improved Community Relations
Objective 6: Coordinate, market, and deliver BJA products and tools as well as other vetted products, tools, methods, and models relative to police-based responses to MHD and IDD. Oversee the content development, production, and maintenance of online media products and tools such as the PMHC Toolkit.

Deliverables:
  • Develop a process to gather and keep current content and information available through the PMHC Toolkit. Identify, curate, and maintain on the PMHC Toolkit: relevant policy papers, publications, articles, and reports or other data from local, state, national, and federal sources for the field at large that highlight/demonstrate research and innovative, promising, and evidence-based approaches to respond/divert/treat people with MHDs and IDDs who are involved in the justice system.
  • Gather existing BJA assets pertinent to police responses to people with MHDs and IDDs and adapt to the existing modular PMHC Toolkit format.
  • Standardize products for online and mobile environments and ensure excellence in their delivery.
  • Develop communication strategies to improve national awareness and knowledge of best practices in police mental health collaboration, information sharing, data capacity, and connections to treatment. This communication strategy is key to ensuring all of the above referenced work is offered regularly and routinely to the field. It will ensure a constant online and in-person presence for BJA to support the field.
Objective 7: Assist in professionalizing, marketing, facilitating, and tracking BJA’s expanded law enforcement-mental health learning sites and manage the demand for onsite visits.

Deliverables:
  • Work with BJA and an existing TTA provider to expand and market the number and geographic diversity of mental health/law enforcement learning sites, which currently are select sites that serve as models to other jurisdictions around the country of effective, specialized police-based responses.
  • Expand the scope of the learning sites to include peer-to-peer learning though Police-Disability Response Teams as developed by the National Arc’s Pathways to Justice Program.
  • Develop and disseminate articles, publications, materials, webinars, and guides as needed to reinforce information exchange between learning sites.
  • Create a professional business process to manage agency visits through planning for and development of learning objectives, agenda development, 90-day follow up on agency implementation of learning objectives, and pre-and post-learning assessments to gauge change regarding material learned.
  • Add to and grow a standardized information packet to make available to interested agencies regarding the learning sites.
Objective 8: Coordinate with BJA’s existing TTA providers to ensure consistency, knowledge, awareness and best use of existing resources and assets. This objective ensures swift responses to requests for technical assistance and develops a coordination capacity so that BJA can ensure the most applicable TTA available nationally is appropriately offered to the field.

Deliverables:
  • Collaborate with all BJA TTA providers that contribute to improving police and law enforcement responses to people with MHD and IDD. Upon BJA’s recommendation and approval, the grantee will meet with or coordinate with other BJA programs, federal agencies, and TTA providers in an effort to collaborate and coordinate services and technical support across offices and departments.
  • Connect interested jurisdictions to BJA resources and relevant providers.
  • Engage proactively with current and future BJA grantees and TTA providers to assess progress, address challenges, and identify lessons learned to share with the field.
  • Collect, maintain, and disseminate information about effective policies, programmatic practices, and trends relevant to police and MHD and IDD service delivery system collaboration.
LINK to RFP: https://www.bja.gov/funding/LEMHTTA17.pdf

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Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
Choice Neighborhoods Planning Grants Program


DEADLINE: Applications Due: August 28, 2017.

AWARD: $5,000,000 is available through this NOFA. HUD anticipates awarding 3 Planning and Action Grants not to exceed $1.3 million each 3 1/2 years for Planning and Action Grants and 3 Planning Grants not to exceed $350,000 each 2 years for Planning Grants. By the end of the grant term, you are required to have matching funds in the amount of five percent of the grant amount in cash or in-kind donations.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: Approximately six awards total, 3 Planning and Action Grants, 3 Planning Grants.

ELIGIBILITY: Eligible applicants under this NOFA are Public Housing Authorities (PHAs), local governments, tribal entities, and nonprofits. Additionally:

  • Troubled Status for PHAs. This applies to PHA applicants. If a PHA was designated as troubled by HUD pursuant to section 6(j)(2) of the 1937 Act on the most recently released Operational Troubled List, HUD will use documents and information available to it to determine whether that PHA qualifies as an eligible applicant. PHAs designated as troubled are strongly encouraged to consider partnering with another entity (such as a local government or a nonprofit) to serve as the Lead Applicant for this Choice Neighborhoods grant. In accordance with section 24(j) of the 1937 Act, a troubled PHA may still be eligible to apply if it:
    • Is designated as troubled principally for reasons that will not affect its capacity to carry out a revitalization program;
    • Is making substantial progress toward eliminating the deficiencies of the agency that resulted in its troubled status;
    • Has not been found to be in noncompliance with fair housing or other civil rights requirements; or
    • Is otherwise determined by HUD to be capable of carrying out a revitalization program.
  • Certification for Multifamily Assisted Property Owners. If the Lead Applicant or Co-Applicant is the owner of the assisted property that is the subject of the Choice Neighborhoods activity grant, the Applicant is required to submit form HUD-2530, Previous Participation Certification. If the property listed has defaulted on a mortgage loan or has less than satisfactory review ratings (physical inspections, management and financial reviews), HUD will use documents and information available to it to determine whether the owner of the property qualifies as an eligible applicant. Approvals of entities that have defaulted or received unsatisfactory review ratings will be subjected to HUD’s Previous Participation clearance review process. Applicants may still be eligible to apply for Choice Neighborhoods funding if HUD deems the applicant to be making substantial progress in addressing the deficiencies related to such default or review rating. Multifamily assisted property owners with defaults or less than satisfactory review ratings are strongly encouraged to consider partnering with another entity (such as a local government or a nonprofit) to serve as the Lead Applicant for this Choice Neighborhoods grant. This requirement is not applicable to applications targeting public housing or Indian housing.
  • Nonprofit Applicant. For a nonprofit to demonstrate eligibility as a Lead or Co-Applicant, either an Internal Revenue Service determination letter indicating the organization’s 501(c) status or the letter from the state government or tribe designating the organization’s nonprofit status must be submitted in the attachments.
TARGET POPULATION: Each application must focus on the revitalization of at least one severely distressed public and/or assisted housing project. You must demonstrate in your application the targeted housing is eligible under this NOFA (i.e. is public and/or assisted housing) and meets the definition of severely distressed.

Eligible neighborhoods for Choice Neighborhoods grant funds are neighborhoods:
  1. with at least 20 percent of the residents estimated to be in poverty or have extremely low incomes based on the most recent data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau; and
  2. experiencing distress related to at least one of the following:
    1. high crime; defined as where either the Part I violent crime rate (measured as Part I Violent Crimes per 1000 persons) over the three years 2014-2016 is at least 1.5 times the per capita Part I violent crime rate (measured as Part I Violent Crimes per 1000 persons) of the city or, where no city data is available, county/parish in which the neighborhood is located over the same time frame; or the rate is greater than 18 crimes per 1000 persons; OR
    2. high vacancy or, for applications targeting Indian housing, substandard homes.
SUMMARY: The Choice Neighborhoods program leverages significant public and private dollars to support locally driven strategies that address struggling neighborhoods with distressed public or HUD-assisted housing through a comprehensive approach to neighborhood transformation. Local leaders, residents, and stakeholders, such as public housing authorities, cities, schools, police, business owners, nonprofits, and private developers, come together to create and implement a plan that revitalizes distressed HUD housing and addresses the challenges in the surrounding neighborhood. The program helps communities transform neighborhoods by redeveloping severely distressed public and/or HUD-assisted housing and catalyzing critical improvements in the neighborhood, including vacant property, housing, businesses, services and schools. To this end, Choice Neighborhoods is focused on three core goals:
  1. Housing: Replace distressed public and assisted housing with high-quality mixed-income housing that is well-managed and responsive to the needs of the surrounding neighborhood;
  2. People: Improve outcomes of households living in the target housing related to employment and income, health, and children’s education; and
  3. Neighborhood: Create the conditions necessary for public and private reinvestment in distressed neighborhoods to offer the kinds of amenities and assets, including safety, good schools, and commercial activity, that are important to families’ choices about their community.
To achieve these core goals, successful applicants must develop and implement a comprehensive neighborhood revitalization strategy, or “Transformation Plan.” This Transformation Plan becomes the guiding document for the revitalization of the public and/or assisted housing units, while simultaneously directing the transformation of the surrounding neighborhood.

Experience shows that to successfully develop and implement the Transformation Plan, broad engagement is needed. Successful applicants will need to work with public and private agencies, organizations (including philanthropic and civic organizations), and individuals to gather and leverage the financial and human capital resources needed to support the sustainability of the plan. These efforts should build community support for and involvement in the development and implementation of the plan.

Additionally, past revitalization efforts have demonstrated that even modest physical improvements and investment actions help communities build momentum for change and transition from planning to implementation of that plan. These actions improve neighborhood confidence, sustain the community’s energy, attract further engagement, and help convince skeptical stakeholders that positive change is possible. Successful applicants should undertake “doing while planning” projects, and when applicable, Action Activities, during the grant period.

Each Choice Neighborhoods grantee is expected to develop metrics based on the objectives listed below in order to measure performance. Grantees are encouraged to develop neighborhood revitalization plans with these objectives in mind:
  1. Housing Objectives: Housing transformed with the assistance of Choice Neighborhoods should be:
    • Well-Managed and Financially Viable. Developments that have budgeted appropriately for the rental income that can be generated from the project and meet or exceed industry standards for quality management and maintenance of the property.
    • Mixed-Income. Housing affordable to families and individuals with a broad range of incomes including low-income, moderate-income, and market rate or unrestricted.
    • Energy Efficient, Sustainable, Accessible, Healthy, and Free from Discrimination. Housing that is well-designed, embraces not only the requirements of accessible design but also concepts of visitability and universal design, has low per unit energy and water consumption and healthy indoor air quality, is built to be resistant to local disaster risk, has affordable broadband Internet access, and is free from discrimination.
  2. People Objectives: People that live in the neighborhood, with a primary focus on residents of the housing targeted for revitalization, benefit from:
    • Effective Education. A high level of resident access to: high quality early learning programs and services so children enter kindergarten ready to learn; and quality schools and/or educational supports that ultimately prepare students to graduate from high school college- and career-ready.
    • Employment Opportunities. The income of neighborhood residents and residents of the target housing development, particularly wage income for non-elderly/non-disabled adult residents, increases over time.
    • Quality Health Care. Health for residents over time is as good as or better than that of other households with similar economic and demographic conditions.
    • Housing Location, Quality, and Affordability. Residents who, by their own choice, do not return to the development have housing and neighborhood opportunities as good as or better than the opportunities available to those who occupy the redeveloped site.
  3. Neighborhood Objectives: Through investments catalyzed with Choice Neighborhoods, the neighborhood enjoys improved:
    • Private and Public Investment in the Neighborhood. The neighboring housing has a very low vacancy/abandonment rate, the housing inventory is of high quality, and the neighborhood is mixed income and maintains a mixture of incomes over time.
    • Amenities. The distance traveled from the neighborhood to basic services is equal to or less than the distance traveled from the median neighborhood in the metropolitan area. Those basic services include grocery stores, banks, health clinics and doctors’ offices, dentist offices, and high quality early learning programs and services.
    • Effective Public Schools: Public schools in the target neighborhood are safe and welcoming places for children and their families. In addition, schools have test scores that are as good as or better than the state average or are implementing school reforms that raise student achievement over time and graduate students from high school prepared for college and a career.
    • Safety: Residents are living in a safer environment as evidenced by the revitalized neighborhood having dramatically lower crime rates than the neighborhood had prior to redevelopment and maintaining a lower crime rate over time.
LINK to RFP: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html, FR-6100-N-38

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Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
Service Area Competition HRSA-18-021


DEADLINE: Application Due Date in Grants.gov: August 21, 2017.
Supplemental Information Due Date in HRSA EHB: September 6, 2017.

AWARD: Anticipated total annual funding of approximately $337.1 million for up to three years. Individual awards vary. Please see the SAAT table for more information: https://bphc.hrsa.gov/sac/.

NUMBER OF AWARDS:Up to 73 grants.

ELIGIBILITY: Public or nonprofit private entities, including tribal, faith-based, or community-based organizations.

TARGET POPULATION: Underserved communities and vulnerable populations.

SUMMARY: The Health Center Program supports public and private nonprofit community-based and patient-directed organizations that provide primary health care services to the Nation’s medically underserved. The purpose of the SAC NOFO is to ensure continued access to affordable, quality primary health care services for communities and vulnerable populations currently served by the Health Center Program.

Your application must document an understanding of the need for primary health care services in the service area and propose a comprehensive plan to meet this need. The plan must ensure the availability and accessibility of primary health care services to all individuals in the service area and target population, regardless of ability to pay. You must further demonstrate that your plan includes collaborative and coordinated delivery systems for the provision of health care to the underserved. Your application must demonstrate compliance with applicable Health Center Program requirements and corresponding regulations and policies.

In addition to the Health Center Program requirements, specific requirements for applicants requesting funding under each health center type are outlined below.

Community Health Center (CHC) Applicants:

  • Provide a plan that ensures the availability and accessibility of required primary and preventive health care services to underserved populations in the service area.
Migrant Health Center (MHC) Applicants:
  • Provide a plan that ensures the availability and accessibility of required primary and preventive health care services to migratory and seasonal agricultural workers and their families in the service area.
    • Migratory agricultural workers are individuals principally employed in agriculture and who establish temporary housing for the purpose of this work, including those individuals who have had such work as their principal employment within 24 months as well as their dependent family members. Agricultural workers who leave a community to work elsewhere are classified as migratory workers in both communities. Aged and disabled former agricultural workers should also be included in this group.
    • Seasonal agricultural workers are individuals employed in agriculture on a seasonal basis who do not establish a temporary home for purposes of employment, including their family members.
Health Care for the Homeless (HCH) Applicants:
  • Provide a plan that ensures the availability and accessibility of required primary and preventive health care services to people experiencing homelessness, defined as patients who lack housing, including residents of permanent supportive housing, transitional housing, or other housing programs that are targeted to homeless populations, in the service area. This plan may also allow for the continuation of services for up to 12 months to individuals no longer homeless as a result of becoming a resident of permanent housing.
  • Provide substance abuse services.
Public Housing Primary Care Applicants:
  • Provide a plan that ensures the availability and accessibility of required primary and preventive health care services to residents of public housing and individuals living in areas immediately accessible to public housing. Public housing means public housing agency-developed, owned, or assisted low-income housing, including mixed finance projects. It does not mean public housing that is only subsidized through Section 8 housing vouchers.
  • Consult with residents of the proposed public housing sites regarding the planning and administration of the program.
LINK to RFP: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html, FOA#: HRSA-18-021

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Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Part C HIV Early Intervention Services Program: Existing Geographic Service Areas


DEADLINE: Applications due: August 14, 2017.

AWARD: Approximately $183,586,879 is expected to be available annually to fund 344 recipients across three (3) different periods of performance start dates:

  • HRSA-18-001 – $65,393,962 per year for three years starting January 1, 2018.
  • HRSA-18-004 – $49,795,407 per year for three years starting April 1, 2018.
  • HRSA-18-005 – $68,397,510 per year for three years starting May 1, 2018.
NUMBER OF AWARDS: Three different numbers of awards with 344 recipients total:
  • HRSA-18-001: 91 grants
  • HRSA-18-004: 114 grants
  • HRSA-18-005: 139 grants
ELIGIBILITY: Public and nonprofit private entities that are:
  1. Federally-qualified health centers;
  2. Grantees under section 1001 (regarding family planning) other than States;
  3. Comprehensive hemophilia diagnostic and treatment centers;
  4. Rural health clinics;
  5. Health facilities operated by or pursuant to a contract with the Indian Health Service;
  6. Community-based organizations, clinics, hospitals and other health facilities that provide early intervention services to those persons infected with HIV/AIDS through intravenous drug use; or
  7. Nonprofit private entities that provide comprehensive primary care services to populations at risk of HIV/AIDS, including faith-based and community-based organizations.
This competition is open to current recipients and new organizations proposing to provide RWHAP Part C EIS funded services in the geographic service areas in Appendix B of the RFA.

TARGET POPULATION: Low-income, uninsured, and underinsured PLWH. The application must address the entire service area, as defined in Appendix B of the RFA. Applicants applying for more than one service area listed in Appendix B must submit a separate application for each service area under the correct funding opportunity number.

SUMMARY: The purpose of fiscal year (FY) 2018 Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program (RWHAP) Part C HIV Early Intervention Services Program: Existing Geographic Service Areas is to provide comprehensive primary health care and support services in an outpatient setting for low income, uninsured, and underinsured people living with HIV (PLWH). Under this announcement, applicants must propose to provide:
  1. targeted HIV counseling and testing;
  2. medical evaluation and clinical and diagnostic services;
  3. therapeutic measures for preventing and treating the deterioration of the immune system, and for preventing and treating conditions arising from HIV/AIDS; and
  4. referrals to appropriate providers of health care and support services.
RWHAP Part C EIS recipients must provide comprehensive primary health care and support services throughout the entire designated geographic service areas (referred to as “service areas” throughout this NOFO) listed in Appendix B with the goals of providing optimal HIV care and treatment for low-income, uninsured, and underinsured PLWH and improving health outcomes.

All allowable services must relate to HIV diagnosis, care and support, and must adhere to established HIV clinical practice standards consistent with U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Guidelines. Please refer to the HIV/AIDS Bureau (HAB) Policy Clarification Notice (PCN) 16-02 Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Services: Eligible Individuals and Allowable Uses of Funds for a list of RWHAP allowable core medical and support services and their descriptions. According to the RWHAP Part C legislation:
  • At least 50 percent of the total grant funds must be spent on EIS (except counseling);
  • At least 75 percent of the award (minus amounts for administrative costs, planning/evaluation, and clinical quality management (CQM)) must be used to provide core medical services (Please note: EIS is a subset of this 75% of the award); and
  • Not more than 10 percent of the total RWHAP Part C grant funds can be spent on administrative costs.
Please note that there are three (3) funding announcement numbers included in this document with three (3) different periods of performance start dates. Applicants must apply to the funding opportunity announcement number that corresponds to the start date for their project.

RWHAP Part C EIS Program Requirements and Expectations

Clinical Requirements:
  • HIV Counseling, Testing and Referral – RWHAP Part C funds can be used to provide HIV Counseling, Testing, and Referral (CTR) services to high risk targeted populations in the designated service area in order to identify PLWH and link them into medical care. However, recipients must coordinate these services with other HIV prevention and testing programs to avoid duplication of effort. Linkages and formal referral mechanisms should be established to ensure follow-up care and treatment for those persons identified as HIV-positive.
  • Medical Care Evaluation and Clinical Care – RWHAP Part C recipients must provide comprehensive patient–centered primary health care services in an outpatient setting for low-income PLWH throughout their entire designated service area. Recipients must also be able to diagnose, provide prophylaxis, and treat or refer clients co-infected with tuberculosis, Hepatitis B and C, and sexually transmitted infections. Program-wide clinical protocols should be in place to address these co-morbidities.
  • Referral Systems - A process must be in place for referring patients to needed health care and support services such as oral health, specialty care, medical case management, etc.
  • Linkage to Clinical Trials – A plan must be in place for referring appropriate patients to biomedical research facilities or community-based organizations that conduct HIV-related clinical trials.
  • Clinical Quality Management – A CQM program must be implemented to: (1) assess the extent to which HIV health services provided to patients under the grant are consistent with HHS Guidelines for the treatment of HIV/AIDS and related opportunistic infections, (2) develop strategies for ensuring that such services are consistent with the guidelines for improvement in the access to quality HIV health services, and (3) ensure that improvements in the access and quality of HIV health services are addressed.
  • Coordination/Linkages to Other Programs – Coordination must occur with all available and accessible community resources, such as federally-funded and non-federally-funded programs (e.g., substance abuse treatment, mental health treatment, homelessness, housing, other support service programs). This may also include other publicly funded entities providing primary care services, such as Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) and behavioral health treatment service organizations, including those funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Recipients are also expected to collaborate with entities that provide ongoing HIV prevention activities and establish formal linkages with them for referral of HIV-positive individuals into care and treatment services at your site.
  • Medicaid Provider Status – All providers of services available under the state Medicaid plan must have entered into a participation agreement under the state plan and be qualified to receive payments under such plan, or receive a waiver from this requirement.
  • Clinic Licensure – Primary medical care providers and case management agencies must be fully licensed to provide clinical and case management services, as required by their state and/or local jurisdiction.
LINK to RFP: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html, FOA#: HRSA-18-001, HRSA-18-004, HRSA-18-005

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Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
Access Increases in Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (AIMS) Supplemental Funding


DEADLINE: EHB Application Access Date: June 30, 2017
Application Due Date: July 26, 2017

AWARD: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) will award approximately $195 million in AIMS funding to eligible health centers. Funding is available as follows:

  • $100 million in ongoing supplements of up to $75,000 to each health center, of which:
    • $50 million will support expansion of services related to mental health (up to $37,500 for each health center); and
    • $50 million will support expansion of substance abuse services focusing on the treatment, prevention, and/or awareness of opioid abuse (up to $37,500 for each health center).
  • $95 million in one-time supplements of up to $75,000 to each health center for health IT and/or training investments that will support the expansion of mental health services, and substance abuse services focusing on the treatment, prevention, and awareness of opioid abuse, and their integration into primary care.
ELIGIBILITY: Existing Health Center Program award recipients.

TARGET POPULATION: Expanded services must be made available to all individuals in the health center’s service area and maximize collaborations with existing mental health and substance abuse providers in the community, including opioid abuse treatment centers, where appropriate.

SUMMARY: This announcement details the fiscal year (FY) 2017 Access Increases in Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (AIMS) supplemental funding opportunity for existing Health Center Program award recipients (hereafter referred to as health centers). The purpose of AIMS funding is to expand access to mental health services, and substance abuse services focusing on the treatment, prevention, and awareness of opioid abuse. Health centers will enhance these services by increasing personnel. They will also leverage health information technology (IT) and provide training to support the expansion of mental health services, and substance abuse services focusing on the treatment, prevention, and awareness of opioid abuse, and their integration into primary care.

Proposals must describe how your health center will achieve the AIMS purpose according to the following Funding Request Rules and Required Activities. Expanded services must be made available to all individuals in the health center’s service area and maximize collaborations with existing mental health and substance abuse providers in the community, including opioid abuse treatment centers, where appropriate.

Funding Request Rules
  • You must request mental health and substance abuse service expansion ongoing funding equally in both service expansion areas (i.e., $37,500 for mental health service expansion and $37,500 for substance abuse service expansion).
  • You must propose to use the ongoing funding to add new direct hire staff and/or contractor(s) and/or expand the hours of existing direct hire staff and/or contractor(s) who will support mental health service expansion, and substance abuse service expansion focusing on the treatment, prevention, and awareness of opioid abuse.
  • You must request mental health and substance abuse service expansion ongoing funding to request one-time funding.
  • You may request mental health and substance abuse service expansion ongoing funding without requesting one-time funding.
  • AIMS funding must supplement and not supplant other resources (federal, state, local, or private).
Required Activities
  • Expand direct hire staff and/or contractor(s) who will support mental health service expansion, and substance abuse service expansion focusing on the treatment, prevention, and awareness of opioid abuse, within 120 days of award.
    • The Staffing Impact Form must demonstrate an increase in full time equivalents (FTEs).
    • Expanded and/or new direct hire staff and contractors must be in one or more of the following personnel positions: psychiatrist, licensed clinical psychologist, licensed clinical social worker, other mental health staff, other licensed mental health provider, substance abuse provider, case manager, patient/community education specialist (health educator), and/or community health worker.
  • Provide access to expanded mental health services, and expanded substance abuse services focusing on the treatment, prevention, and awareness of opioid abuse, directly or through contracts or agreements for which the health center pays within 120 days of award.
    • AIMS funding may expand existing services in scope as well as support new mental health and substance abuse services that are not currently in your scope of project if they align with the AIMS purpose.
  • Increase the number of mental health patients and/or substance abuse patients as a result of AIMS funding by December 31, 2018. The Patient Impact Form must demonstrate an increase in the number of existing patients and/or new patients accessing mental health services, and/or substance abuse services focusing on the treatment, prevention, and awareness of opioid abuse.
Examples of AIMS Funding Uses The following examples of eligible activities are not exhaustive. Applicants may propose other activities that align with the AIMS purpose.

Examples of Activities for Mental Health and Substance Abuse Personnel Supported with Ongoing Funding
  • Diagnose and treat mental health disorders.
  • Diagnose and treat substance use disorders focusing on the treatment, prevention, and awareness of opioid abuse.
  • Use an integrated approach to diagnosing and treating co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders.
  • Use evidence-based tools and other standards of care (e.g., Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT)).
  • Provide case management services to patients with mental health disorders to support treatment, including coordination with specialty providers that will provide care via referral agreement for severe/complex cases, if applicable.
  • Provide case management services to patients with substance use disorders to support treatment, including coordination with specialty providers that will provide care via referral agreement for severe/complex cases, if applicable.
  • Provide integrated case management services to patients with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders to support treatment, including coordination with specialty providers that will provide care via referral agreement for severe/complex cases, if applicable.
  • Expand evidence-based mental health and substance abuse prevention and education programs for patients, families, communities, and personnel to increase awareness of, patient access to, and patient retention in mental health and substance use disorder treatment programs.
  • As part of a comprehensive approach to reducing risk for people struggling with opioid abuse, increase awareness of the appropriate use of naloxone to reverse opioid overdose through patient, family, community, and personnel training.
  • Empower patients with mental health and substance use disorders to make informed decisions about their care, including pain management alternatives, treatment options, and recovery through peer counselling, patient education, or other evidence-based strategies.
  • Enhance education for patients, families, communities, and personnel to support patient engagement and self-management that includes medical conditions that often co-occur with mental health and substance use disorders (e.g., diabetes mellitus, heart failure, hepatitis, HIV/AIDS, hypertension, obesity).
  • Collaborate with existing community resources to address environmental factors that impact the onset or recurrence of substance use disorders, with a focus on opioid use disorders.
Examples of One-Time Funding Uses
  • Facilitate referrals at point of care to increase access to and patient engagement in mental health services, and substance abuse services focusing on the treatment, prevention, and awareness of opioid abuse.
  • Increase access to medication-assisted treatment (MAT) by supporting substance abuse and primary care providers, including non-physician providers (e.g., nurse practitioners, physician assistants), in obtaining appropriate Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 (DATA) waivers.
  • Increase the use of telehealth to support access to and delivery of mental health and substance use disorder treatment services across sites in scope, including purchasing equipment (e.g., webcams, videoconferencing equipment, speakers).
  • Enhance documentation and sharing of electronic health record (EHR) information to support telehealth patient visits.
  • Improve interoperability of mental health/substance abuse and primary health care EHR systems.
  • Enhance EHR interoperability and health information exchange with clinical and public health partners.
  • Improve integration of prescription drug monitoring program data into EHR and quality improvement activities.
  • Integrate clinical decision support tools into EHR (e.g., chronic pain management and prescribing guidelines; condition-specific order sets; evidence-based screening tools; SBIRT).
  • Enhance operational and clinical workflows to support the use of health IT that improves the effectiveness of mental health and substance abuse services and increases patient engagement and self-management.
  • Enhance performance reports to facilitate the use of data to evaluate clinical quality, identify areas for innovation and clinical quality improvement, and better manage population health.
  • Strengthen participation in cybersecurity information sharing and analysis systems to protect patients’ mental health and substance use disorder clinical information.
  • Provide evidence-based training and educational resources to health professionals on screening for mental health and substance use disorders, making informed prescribing decisions, supporting patient-provider shared decision making on pain management and treatment options, and/or maximizing the success of MAT, including engagement in Internet-based mentoring and provider education and support (e.g., Project ECHO).
  • Provide training and educational resources to personnel, patients, families, and communities on trauma-informed care, suicide prevention, and opioid abuse, including the use of live and virtual self-management resources.
  • Enhance cybersecurity training for providers and personnel to ensure the robust and consistent security of patient’s mental health and substance use disorder clinical information.
LINK to RFP: https://bphc.hrsa.gov/programopportunities/fundingopportunities/supplement/aims.fy17.instructions.pdf

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Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
Rural Health Opioid Program


DEADLINE: Applications Due: July 21, 2017.

AWARD: Anticipated total funding of $3,000,000 with awards of up to $250,000 per year for three years.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: Up to 12 awards.

ELIGIBILITY: Eligible applicants include rural public or rural non-profit private entities that represent consortiums composed of 3 or more health care providers. One member of the consortium will act as the grantee and submit the application.

Any state, public, or private entity may apply for this funding opportunity, assuming they meet the RHOP requirements. This includes faith-based and community-based organizations as well as federally recognized tribes and tribal organizations.

Applicants for the Rural Health Opioid Program must meet the ownership and geographic requirements stated below:

  • The applicant organization must be a public or private non-profit entity located in a rural area or in a rural census tract of an urban county, and all services must be provided in a rural county or census tract. (To ascertain rural eligibility, please refer to: http://datawarehouse.hrsa.gov/RuralAdvisor/ and enter the applicant organization’s state and county.)
  • In determining eligibility for this funding, FORHP realizes there are some metropolitan areas that would otherwise be considered non-metropolitan if the core, urbanized area population count did not include federal and/or state prison populations. Consequently, FORHP has created an exceptions process whereby applicants from metropolitan counties in which the combined population of the core-urbanized area is more than 50,000 can request an exception by demonstrating that through the removal of federal and/or state prisoners from that count, they would have a population total of less than 50,000.
  • If the applicant organization is owned by or affiliated with an urban entity or health care system, the rural component may still apply as long as the rural entity has its own Employer Identification Number (EIN) and can directly receive and administer the grant funds in the rural area.
  • Funding provided through this program must be used for programs that serve populations residing in HRSA designated rural areas. Please confirm that the service area and recipients of this award reside in a HRSA designated rural area by visiting: http://datawarehouse.hrsa.gov/RuralAdvisor/.
TARGET POPULATION: Individuals with opioid-use disorder (OUD) in rural communities.

SUMMARY: The purpose of the Rural Health Opioid Program (RHOP) Program is to reduce the morbidity and mortality related to opioid overdoses in rural communities through the development of broad community consortiums to prepare individuals with opioid-use disorder (OUD) to start treatment, implement care coordination practices to organize patient care activities, and support individuals in recovery by establishing new or enhancing existing behavioral counseling, peer support, and alternative pain management activities.

This program will bring together non-profit entities such as hospitals, primary care practices, substance abuse, treatment centers, social service organizations, and other community groups to respond with a multifaceted approach to the opioid epidemic in a rural community. The consortium must include at least three (3) health care providers. The program will support three (3) years of funding with the primary goal of demonstrating improved and measurable health outcomes, including but not limited to, reducing opioid overdose morbidity and mortality in rural areas.

This program incorporates a range of objectives to respond comprehensively to the opioid crisis within rural communities. Consortiums will work towards identifying individuals at-risk of overdose and guide them towards recovery by providing outreach and education on locally available treatment options and support services. Educating community members on OUD is also a critical component of responding to the opioid epidemic, which incorporates education on OUD, treatment options, methods for preparing individuals with OUD for treatment, referring individuals with OUD to treatment, and how to best support individuals in recovery. Consortiums are encouraged to implement care coordination practices to organize patient care activities. Finally, consortiums are further encouraged to support individuals in recovery by establishing new or enhancing existing behavioral counselling and peer support activities.

LINK to RFP: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=284888

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New York City Department of Youth and Community Development (DYCD)
Runaway and Homeless Youth Services (Open-Ended)


DEADLINE: Open-Ended.

AWARD: Available in RFP. Number of awards not mentioned in concept paper.

ELIGIBILITY: To receive this RFP in the HHS Accelerator system, you must have an approved Service Application for at least one of the following:

  • Preventive Services
  • Case Management
  • Shelter
  • Drop-in Center
  • Homelessness Prevention
  • Housing
TARGET POPULATION: Runaway and homeless youth and their families in New York City.

SUMMARY: The New York City Department of Youth and Community Development (DYCD) invests in a network of community based organizations and programs to alleviate the effects of poverty and provide opportunities for New Yorkers and communities to flourish.

DYCD funds a range of services for Runaway and Homeless Youth that includes Drop-in Centers, Crisis Shelters, Transitional Independent Living programs, and Street Outreach and Referral Services.

DYCD’s Runaway and Homeless Youth services are designed to protect runaway and homeless youth and reunite them with their families whenever possible.

In accordance with their mission to support the City’s youth and their families by funding high quality youth and community development programs, DYCD is seeking additional beds to be operated by qualified nonprofits organizations to provide residential beds within Crisis shelters or transitional independent living facilities.

LINK to RFP: http://www1.nyc.gov/assets/hhsaccelerator/downloads/pdf/DYCDRunawayandHomelessYouthServices.pdf, RFP available to eligible applicants in HHS Accelerator

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New York City Human Resources Administration (HRA)
NY/NY III Non-Emergency Permanent Supportive Congregate Housing for Chronically Homeless Single Adults Living with AIDS or Advanced HIV Illness


DEADLINE: This is an open-ended RFP; therefore, all proposals will be accepted and reviewed on an ongoing basis until all units covered by this RFP are sited.

AWARD: HRA has determined that the maximum cost per unit will be $25,444 per year. However, HRA reserves the right to develop contracts with a lower unit cost. Contractors should seek and secure the use of non-HRA funding and in kind contributions in their overall operating budget when applicable, to maximize economies of scale. Such funding would provide an offset to the negotiated annual budget amount.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: 145 units remaining

ELIGIBILITY: Permanent non-emergency facilities would accept all referrals forwarded for each vacant unit unless the program can demonstrate to HASA that the client is not suitable for the program.

TARGET POPULATION: Chronically homeless single adults living with HIV/AIDS or advanced HIV illness.

SUMMARY: HRA is seeking appropriately qualified vendors to operate and maintain approximately 145 units remaining of permanent supportive congregate housing for chronically homeless single adults who are living with HIV/AIDS and who suffer from a co-occurring serious and persistent mental illness, a substance abuse disorder, or a Mentally Ill Chemical Abuse (MICAS) disorder.

Under these programs the proposer is expected to provide case management and support services to clients to enable all eligible clients to achieve the skills and financial independence required for independent living. In addition, the proposer is required to maximize the client’s self-reliance and capacity for independence through referrals to employment programs for training, vocational rehabilitation and job placement. The proposer is expected to work with the target population to maximize functional capacity, reduce morbidity and mortality by linking clients to health, mental health and/or substance abuse treatment services and monitoring treatment adherence/compliance.

This is an Open-Ended RFP; therefore, proposals will be accepted and reviewed on an ongoing basis until all units covered by this RFP are sited.

RFP available at: http://www1.nyc.gov/site/hra/business/request-for-proposals.page, (see Request for Proposals for Provision of Non-Emergency Permanent Supportive Congregate Housing for Chronically Homeless Single Adults Living with AIDS or Advanced HIV Illness under the NY/NY III Supportive Housing Agreement (Opened Ended).

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New York State Office of Mental Health
Empire State Supportive Housing Initiative


DEADLINE: Applications due: July 24, 2017.

AWARD: New York State will award service and operating funding for units of housing developed with capital funding to support the needs of the individuals residing in the units. Up to $25,000 per unit annually in services and operating funding is available through this RFP. The State anticipates providing an inflationary adjustment in subsequent years, subject to available appropriations for and/or statutory authorization of such increases.

ELIGIBILITY: This funding opportunity is only open to not- for-profit organizations that are properly incorporated or organized under the laws of New York with demonstrated experience in one or more of the following areas:

  • Housing for homeless families, individuals, and/or young adults;
  • Housing for families, individuals, and/or young adults with an unstable housing history;
  • Housing for families, individuals, and/or young adults who are at risk of homelessness;
  • Housing for families, individuals, and/or young adults that have health, mental health, intellectual or developmental disability, and / or substance use disorders;
  • Housing for youth/young adults with significant histories of mental health, foster care or criminal/juvenile justice involvement; and
  • Providing services and supports to help families, individuals, and/or youth/young adults that have disabling conditions or life challenges as identified in Section 1.4 of the RFP that require specialized support services to become and remain stably housed.
TARGET POPULATION: Homeless individuals with special needs, conditions or other life challenges in New York.

The eligible target populations to be served under this program are families, individuals and/or young adults who are both homeless (see glossary for definition) and who are identified as having an unmet housing need as determined by the CoC or local planning entity or through other supplemental local, state and federal data, AND have one or more disabling conditions or other life challenges, including:
  • Serious mental illness (SMI);
  • Substance Use Disorder (SUD);
  • Persons living with HIV or AIDS;
  • Victims/Survivors of domestic violence;
  • Military service with disabilities (including veterans with other than honorable discharge);
  • Chronic homelessness as defined by HUD (including families, and individuals experiencing street homelessness or long-term shelter stays);
  • Youth / young adults who left foster care within the prior five years and who were in foster care at or over age 16;
  • Homeless young adults between 18 and 25 years old;
  • Adults, youth or young adults reentering the community from incarceration or juvenile justice placement, particularly those with disabling conditions;
  • Frail or disabled seniors;
  • Individuals with I/DD; and
  • Individuals who are Medicaid Redesign Team (MRT) high cost Medicaid populations (MRT Eligible).
  • Multiple eligible target populations may be located within a singular housing project.
SUMMARY: New York State is issuing this RFP opportunity to provide services and operating funding of up to 1,200 units of Supportive Housing for persons identified as homeless with special needs, conditions or other life challenges. Capital funding to develop these units is available through separate funding mechanisms.

The New York State Office of Mental Health (OMH) will serve as the lead procurement agency for this Request for Proposals (RFP) under the guidance of the ESSHI Interagency Workgroup. Although the OMH is the lead, proposals accepted through this RFP opportunity do not have to be for services to persons with mental illness but should address the range of needs of the populations served by the following agencies. The ESSHI Interagency Workgroup includes representatives from several State agencies including:
  • Department of Health (DOH) including the AIDS Institute;
  • New York State Homes and Community Renewal (HCR);
  • Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS);
  • Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS);
  • Office of Mental Health (OMH);
  • Office for the Prevention of Domestic Violence (OPDV);
  • Office of Temporary and Disability Assistance (OTDA); and
  • Office for People with Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD).
New York has led the nation in affordable housing preservation and construction. The State Fiscal Year 2018 Enacted Budget continues funding to advance Governor Cuomo’s $20 billion comprehensive, five-year plan for affordable and supportive housing to ensure New Yorkers have access to safe and secure housing. The Budget includes $2.5 billion in funding toward the creation or preservation of 100,000 affordable and 6,000 supportive housing units. Of the 6,000 supportive housing units to be created under the Housing Plan, 5,000 will be located in New York City and 1,000 in the Rest of State. New York will invest a portion of these resources to specifically address vulnerable populations experiencing homelessness. To ensure the maximum benefit of this investment, the State will utilize the existing federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Continuum of Care (CoC) model that engages localities and not-for-profit (NFP) providers in developing and implementing data-driven strategies to address homelessness in specific populations such as victims of domestic violence, runaway and homeless youth and formerly incarcerated individuals. New York State intends to develop a total of 20,000 units over the next 15 years. As such, New York State is issuing this Request for Proposals (RFP) to advance the five-year goal of developing more than 6,000 units of supportive housing over five years for persons identified as homeless with special needs, conditions or other life challenges.

LINK to RFP: https://www.omh.ny.gov/omhweb/rfp/2017/esshi/rfp.pdf

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New York State Department of Health
Assets Coming Together for Youth: Center for Community Action on Adolescent Health


DEADLINE: Applications due: July 18, 2017.

AWARD: $1,100,000 per year for five years.

Annual funding for this initiative will be composed of the following sources:

  • Personal Responsibility Education Program (Federal) - $360,350
  • Abstinence Education Grant Program (Federal) - $331,770
  • Maternal Child Health Services Block Grant (Federal) - $307,880
  • Aids Institute (State) - $100,000
  • Required In-kind support -- $250,000
NUMBER OF AWARDS: One award.

ELIGIBILITY: Minimum Eligibility Requirements:
  • The applicant must be a not-for-profit 501(c)(3) organization.
  • The applicant must have prequalified status in the NYS Grants Gateway, if not exempt, on the due date and time the applications are due.
  • Applicants should demonstrate an in-depth knowledge, demonstrated by evidence of: research publications and presenting relevant subject matter to a national audience; experience in translational research and/or support of research-to-practice; access to adolescent medicine expertise; in-depth knowledge and experience in the development and evaluation of community-based programs; an in-depth knowledge of youth development principles and practices; and statewide coverage with a physical presence of staff and personnel in both the Metropolitan New York City area and upstate New York. This may be accomplished through a lead organization with partner subcontracts.
  • Applicants must employ a Project Director who will be responsible for CCA administration, operation and oversight. This individual will be accessible for communications, including e-mail, and will attend meetings with the NYSDOH along with other appropriate staff.
  • The application must identify one lead organization; however, the applicant may include collaborations with other appropriate agencies to meet the statewide needs of this RFA. The lead agency must be a not-for-profit entity. In-kind funds in the amount of $250,000 from the lead agency are required. These funds may not be used as a match towards any other grant. Failure to adhere to this in-kind requirement will result in disqualification.
TARGET POPULATION: Adolescents in New York.

SUMMARY: This Request for Applications (RFA) will fund one Assets Coming Together for Youth Center for Community Action on Adolescent Health (ACT CCA) contract, funded at the level of $1,100,000 per year for five years, to promote a standard of excellence among community-based adolescent sexual health and other adolescent health programs. The CCA will support the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH)'s Title V Maternal and Child Health Service Block Grant by aligning with the eight core Maternal and Child Health (MCH) priorities identified for New York State (NYS). NYS' Title V program has been a national leader in building comprehensive service systems for adolescents including access to confidential sexual and reproductive health services and delivery of evidence-based programming to improve adolescent health and well-being including a strong focus on positive youth development. Key successes in NYS include strong networks of youth serving providers including school based health centers and community-based programs, policies that support access to health insurance and confidential health care services, and strong technical support for evidence-based programming through state-academic partnerships. The Title V Action Plan and the New York State Youth Sexual Health Plan include strengthening partnerships to address adolescent mental health issues, support social emotional development, promote healthy relationships and wellness, and improve transition to adult roles.

LINK to RFP: https://www.health.ny.gov/funding/rfa/17251/index.htm

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Office for Victims of Crime (OVC)
Vision 21 Integrated Services for Victims Program: Increasing Access to Mental Health Services for Victims of Crime


DEADLINE: Applications due: August 10, 2017.

AWARD: There are multiple Purpose Areas with different awards under this solicitation:

Purpose Area 1: Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Training for Crime Victim Advocates
OVC expects to make up one award of up to $500,000 under this purpose area. OVC expects to make the award for a 36-month period of performance, to begin on October 1, 2017.

Purpose Area 2A – Direct Services: Increasing Access to Victim Services for Victims of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Who Have an SMI
OVC expects to make up to three awards of up to $350,000 each, for a total of up to $1,050,000 under this purpose area. OVC expects to make the awards for a 36-month period of performance, to begin on October 1, 2017.

Purpose Area 2B – Training and Technical Assistance: Increasing Access to Victim Services for Victims of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Who Have an SMI
OVC expects to make one award of up to $400,000 under this purpose area. OVC expects to make the award for a 36-month period of performance, to begin on October 1, 2017.

Purpose Area 3A – Direct Services: Increasing Access to Mental Health Services to Traditionally Underserved Victims of Crime
OVC expects to make up to three awards of up to $450,000, for a total of up to $1,350,000 under this purpose area. OVC expects to make the awards for a 36-month period of performance, to begin on October 1, 2017.

Purpose Area 3B – Training and Technical Assistance: Increasing Access to Mental Health Services to Traditionally Underserved Victims of Crime
OVC expects to make one award of up to $450,000 under this purpose area. OVC expects to make the award for a 36-month period of performance, to begin on October 1, 2017.

ELIGIBILITY: There are multiple Purpose Areas with different eligibility under this solicitation:

Purpose Area 1: Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Training for Crime Victim Advocates
Eligible applicants for this purpose area are limited to: nonprofit and for-profit organizations (including tribal nonprofit and for-profit organizations; and institutions of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education). For-profit organizations (like other recipients) must forgo any profit or management fee. The successful applicant would be required to report any profits generated from the project as program income, and would also be required to reinvest any program income into the project. Applicants to this purpose area must have demonstrated experience and understanding of suicide and suicidality, including experience developing and implementing suicide prevention activities, implementing suicide screening and assessment activities, and providing training to lay persons and professionals on screening, assessment, and intervention.

Purpose Area 2A- Direct Services: Increasing Access to Victim Services for Victims of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Who Have an SMI
Eligible applicants for this purpose area are limited to: (a) mental health services programs operated by state, local, or by federally recognized Indian tribal governments (as determined by the Secretary of the Interior); and (b) nonprofit organizations (including tribal nonprofit organizations) whose primary mission is to provide direct services to victims of domestic violence and sexual assault.

Applications developed in response to this purpose area must be developed through a collaborative partnership that includes both (a) and (b), and the application must be supported by an MOU signed by both partners as detailed on page 26. OVC will designate any applicant who fails to demonstrate that its application for funding was developed collaboratively, and/or who fails to submit the required MOU as ineligible for funding consideration.

Purpose Area 2B – Training and Technical Assistance: Increasing Access to Victim Services for Victims of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Who Have an SMI
Eligible applicants for this purpose area include institutions of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education) and nonprofit organizations (including tribal nonprofit organizations). Applicants for this purpose area must demonstrate: an expert-level understanding of the etiology and treatment of SMI; experience in developing programs or strategies to increase access to mental health services for individuals with SMI; subject matter expertise in issues related to domestic violence and sexual assault; prior experience in providing TTA on these topics to mental health professionals and victim advocates.

Purpose Area 3A – Direct Services: Increasing Access to Mental Health Services to Traditionally Underserved Victims of Crime
Eligible applicants for this purpose area include: (a) mental health services programs operated by state, local, or by federally recognized Indian tribal governments (as determined by the Secretary of the Interior); and (b) nonprofit organizations (including tribal nonprofit organizations) whose primary mission is to provide services to victims of crime.

Applications developed in response to this purpose area must be developed through a collaborative partnership that includes both (a) and (b), and the application must be supported by an MOU signed by both partners as detailed on page 26. If neither (a) nor (b) has demonstrated expertise in providing culturally competent services to the target population that would be served in the application, then the collaborative partnership must be expanded to include a nonprofit and/or community-based organization whose primary mission is to meet the specific health, safety, or general welfare needs of the underserved population that would be the recipient of the proposed services. OVC will designate any applicant who fails to demonstrate that its application for funding was developed collaboratively, and/or who fails to submit the required MOU as ineligible for funding consideration.

Purpose Area 3B – Training and Technical Assistance: Increasing Access to Mental Health Services to Traditionally Underserved Victims of Crime
Eligible applicants for this purpose area include institutions of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education) and nonprofit organizations (including tribal nonprofit organizations). Applicants for this purpose area must demonstrate: subject matter expertise in understanding and treating the mental health needs of victims of crime; expertise in providing training on how to provide culturally competent services to members of multicultural populations; experience in using technology and other media to help communities develop innovative solutions to providing mental health services; and an expert level of understanding of the mental and emotional needs of victims of crime.

Eligible applicants may apply to only one purpose area in this solicitation. OVC will not consider applicants that apply for more than one purpose area.

TARGET POPULATION: Traditionally underserved victims of crime, victim services providers, and mental health services providers.

Traditionally underserved victims of crime include:

  • Victims of crime at risk for suicide,
  • Victims of domestic violence and sexual assault who have a Serious Mental Illness (SMI), For purposes of this program, an individual who has an SMI includes anyone: (i) age 18 or older, (ii) who is currently experiencing/or has experienced in the past 12 months, (iii) a diagnosable mental, behavioral, or emotional disorder that has lasted long enough to meet the diagnostic criteria in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, and (iv) the disorder “…substantially interferes with or limits one or more major life activities,”
  • Crime victims from traditionally underserved communities. For purposes of this program, the term “traditionally underserved” refers to individuals who are members of any of the following populations of victims of crime: deaf and hard-of-hearing; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT); American Indians/Alaska Natives; older adults; Limited English Proficient (LEP) individuals; and those who reside in rural communities.
SUMMARY: The primary aim of OVC’s FY 2017 Vision 21 Integrated Services for Victims Program: Increasing Access to Mental Health Services for Victims of Crime (Vision 21 ISV Program) is to bridge the divide between crime victims, victim services providers, and mental health services providers so that communities are able to create a seamless network of services to assist crime victims to recover, heal, and thrive. The Vision 21 ISV Program includes three goals that will: (1) help victim services providers to properly identify crime victims who may be exhibiting signs of suicidality, refer them to appropriate mental health services, and support their access to such services; (2) increase the capacity of both victim services providers and mental health service providers to provide mental health services to victims of domestic violence and sexual assault who also have a severe mental illness; and (3) increase access to mental health services for traditionally underserved victims of crime. The five Vision 21 ISV Program purpose areas are described in greater detail below.
  1. Purpose Area 1: Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Training for Crime Victim Advocates
    A “gatekeeper” is an individual who routinely has personal contact with community members and who, with proper training and education, has the ability to identify community members at risk for suicide and refer them to appropriate services. While many victims of crime may struggle to cope with grief/loss and trauma, some (e.g., adolescents, victims of intimate partner violence, victims of rape/sexual assault) may be more susceptible to depression and intense feelings of hopelessness that place them at higher risk for suicidal ideation, attempts, and completions. Crime victim advocates, including both systems- and community-based advocates, have frequent contact with victims of crime, and may be in the best position to notice symptoms of suicidality among members of this population and refer individuals in crisis to much needed psychiatric care.

    The Vision 21 ISV Program will increase the capacity of crime victim advocates to identify, refer, and support crime victims’ access to emergency/crisis mental health services to help prevent suicide among this vulnerable population by making one, 36- month award to a qualified organization to: (a) develop a specialized gatekeeper training curriculum for crime victim advocates; (b) conduct a series of regional training events to train crime advocates on how to use the curriculum; and (c) provide ongoing post-training technical assistance and support to advocates.

    Goal #1: The award recipient will spend the first 12 months of the award period developing products necessary to provide training. The following objectives support this goal:
    • Develop the gatekeeper training curriculum designed to develop the capacity of crime victim advocates to appropriately identify symptoms of suicidality in crime victims, appropriately intervene, and refer the victims for mental health services;
    • Develop a train-the-trainer curriculum designed to provide workshop participants with the knowledge and skills necessary to deliver the gatekeeper training course themselves;
    • Cooperate with OVC in vetting both curricula with appropriate federal agencies and private organizations as appropriate, and finalizing the curricula so that they comply with OVC’s publication guidelines;
    • Publishing/reproducing electronic and hard copies of both curricula for dissemination.
    Goal #2: Once the curricula have been finalized and approved by OVC, the award recipient will deliver the train-the-trainer curriculum in a series of six regional workshops. The following objectives support this goal:
    • Budget $50,000 of award funds to provide travel scholarship assistance to workshop participants as necessary;
    • Cooperate with OVC in planning the dates and locations of the training workshops;
    • Developing and implementing a plan to market the workshops to the target audience in collaboration with OVC;
    • Manage all logistical aspects of planning and conducting the workshops, including: cooperating with OVC and other relevant DOJ components in obtaining approval for costs associated with planning and conducting the workshops; procuring event space, audio-visual equipment, and support; administering travel scholarships; and managing advance and onsite participant registration.
    Goal #3: The award recipient will provide ongoing guidance and support to participants who have completed the workshop and are delivering the gatekeeper training curriculum. The following objectives support this goal:
    • Devise and implement a strategy to provide post-training coaching and mentoring to participants;
    • Develop a plan to facilitate post-training peer support for workshop participants; and
    • Develop a plan to sustain the project once federal funding is no longer available.
  2. Purpose Area 2: Increasing Access to Victim Services for Victims of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Who Have a Serious Mental Illness (SMI)

    Purpose Area 2A: Funding for Direct Services: While individuals with an SMI are as much as 11 times more likely than people without an SMI to become the victim of a crime, they are highly unlikely to be identified as a victim of crime or receive services due to a number of personal, systemic, and institutional barriers, including: misperceptions/stereotypes about individuals with SMI among service providers; the high likelihood that such victims will have a co-occurring substance abuse disorder; and the untreated symptoms of their SMI.

    Overcoming barriers to access services can be particularly difficult for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault who have an SMI. The prevalence of domestic violence and sexual assault histories among women with SMI, for example, may be as high as 30%; however, these victims are more likely to be referred to a psychiatric facility when they contact traditional domestic violence or sexual assault services programs because their reports are often misinterpreted as being a symptom of their mental illness. Under this purpose area, OVC will award up to three, 36-month cooperative agreements to: (a) aid domestic violence and sexual assault services providers with properly identifying victims who have an SMI, referring them to mental health services treatment, and adapt their operational policies and procedures to ensure that victims with SMI have full and equal access to the services offered by their programs; and (b) assist mental health services providers with revising their intake/assessment procedures to include screening for domestic violence or sexual assault victimization, and referring clients to specialized domestic violence or sexual assault resources. Applicants must demonstrate that the proposed project has been developed through a collaborative partnership between a state, local, tribal, or nonprofit domestic violence or sexual assault services provider program, and a state, local, tribal, or nonprofit mental health services provider program.

    Goal #1: Award recipients who receive funding to support the delivery of direct services under Purpose Area 2 will be required to spend the first 9 months of the 36-month award period devising a plan to deliver services to members of the target population. The following objectives support this goal:
    • Conduct a community needs assessment to identify gaps in services and barriers to accessing services for the target population; and
    • Develop a strategic plan to remedy the systemic problems identified through the assessment, including the adoption of new or revised standard operating procedures and policies, and training for organizational staff members, and the staff of partnering agencies and organizations designed to increase their ability to properly identify and respond to victims of domestic violence or sexual assault who have an SMI.
    Goal #2: Grantees will refer or link victims of domestic violence and sexual assault with an SMI to appropriate services to comprehensively address issues related to their SMI, any co-occurring substance abuse or alcohol abuse disorder, and their violent victimization. All victims served by an award funded under this purpose area must have the opportunity to participate in: individual/group counseling, as appropriate; psychiatric rehabilitation services; case management services; psychiatric care, including psychiatric assessment and medication management services; and drug/alcohol counseling. The following objectives support this goal:
    • Hire qualified, licensed mental health professionals and/or certified substance abuse counselors to deliver individual or group counseling, and/or psychiatric rehabilitation and case management services for members of the target population;
    • Identify additional collaborative partners and referral resources to ensure that the full complement of the victim’s issues can be adequately and appropriately addressed through cross-referrals for services not available through the partnering agencies;
    • Provide training to organizational staff and the staff of partnering agencies and organizations on how to screen for symptoms of SMI, and personal histories of domestic violence or sexual assault during intake and assessment processes; and
    • Develop and implement response protocols that ensure that victims of domestic violence and sexual assault who have an SMI are appropriately identified and linked to necessary services.
    Applicants to Purpose Area 2A must demonstrate that their proposed project was developed as a collaborative partnership between: (1) a state, local, tribal, or mental health services program; and (2) a nonprofit domestic violence or sexual assault services provider program. Applicants must also demonstrate that the required partners will work collaboratively to develop and implement the grant-funded project.

    Purpose Area 2B: Training and Technical Assistance (TTA): As part of the Vision 21 ISV Program, OVC will award a 36-month cooperative agreement to a qualified organization to provide TTA to up to three grantees who would receive funding under Purpose Area 2A. Any proposed strategy for delivering TTA to grant award recipients funded under Purpose Area 2A should include a comprehensive plan to increase the capacity of organizations participating in the funded project to meet the needs of victims of domestic violence or sexual assault who have an SMI.

    Goal: The award recipient under this purpose area will be required to devise a plan to deliver TTA to the grantees who receive funding under Purpose Area 2A. The following objectives support this goal:
    • Work with OVC to plan and conduct a 2-day in-person, grantee orientation meeting including: cooperating with OVC in identifying the location and dates for the meeting; cooperating with OVC and other DOJ components in obtaining approval for the costs associated with conducting the meeting; seeking OVC review and approval of the agenda and all presentation materials; procuring audio-visual equipment and support services; and managing all onsite logistics for the meeting;
    • Cooperate with OVC in devising a plan for ongoing TTA for all grantees through a combination of: periodic webinars and/or conference calls; annual, 2-day in-person meetings in years 2 and 3 of the award period; and annual onsite visits to each of the three grantees;
    • Provide technical guidance to grantees on completing the required community needs assessment and strategic plan;
    • Conduct individual assessment of each grantee’s TTA needs and provide a written report to OVC and the grantee;
    • Develop and implement a customized plan for the delivery of TTA to each grantee through a combination of remote and onsite methods; and
    • Devise a strategy to develop peer-to-peer mentoring and support among grant award recipients.
  3. Purpose Area 3: Increasing Access to Mental Health Services to Traditionally Underserved Victims of Crime
    Purpose Area 3A: Funding for Direct Services: Crime victims from traditionally underserved communities may have difficulty accessing mental health services due to a variety of factors, including: geographic isolation; a lack of local mental health professionals; higher rates of unemployment and poverty; language barriers; and a lack of culturally competent services.

    OVC proposes to increase access to mental health services for crime victims from traditionally underserved populations by awarding up to three, 36-month cooperative agreements to eligible applicants to develop and implement projects that propose to use technology and other innovative practices to reach these populations. Applicants under this purpose area must demonstrate that their proposed project has been developed through a collaborative partnership between: (a) a state, local, tribal, or nonprofit mental health services provider program; (b) a state, local, tribal, or nonprofit crime victim services provider program; and (c) a nonprofit and/or community-based organization whose primary mission is to meet the specific health, safety, or general welfare needs of the underserved population that would be the recipient of the proposed services if neither (a) nor (b) has expertise in meeting the cultural needs of the target population to be served.

    Goal #1: Award recipients who receive funding to support the delivery of direct services under Purpose Area 3 will be required to spend the first 9 months of the 36-month award period devising a plan to deliver services to members of the target population. The following objectives support this goal:
    • Conduct a community needs assessment to identify gaps in services and barriers to accessing services for the target population; and
    • Develop a strategic plan to remedy the systemic problems identified through the assessment, including the adoption of new or revised standard operating procedures and policies, and training for organizational staff members and the staff of partnering agencies and organizations designed to increase their ability to provide culturally competent services to members of the underserved population to be served in the proposed project.
    Goal #2: Grantees under this purpose area must develop and implement creative/innovative projects designed to help crime victims in the underserved population to be served by the proposed project to overcome barriers to accessing mental health services. The following objectives illustrate activities that may be used to support this goal (please note that this list is not comprehensive):
    • Develop a partnership with primary medical care providers to increase screening for crime victimization histories in primary care facilities/settings, and facilitate referrals for appropriate mental health services;
    • Create a community education and outreach campaign designed to increase understanding and awareness of the effect of crime victimization on the mental health and well-being of members of the target population;
    • Support telebehavioral health or distance counseling options to increase access to mental health services for victims of crime in geographically isolated communities, and/or communities with few accessible mental health resources;
    • Provide transportation to crime victims to help support their access to mental health services;
    • Hire qualified, licensed mental health professionals to provide office-based and/or community-based individual counseling to victims of crime; and
    • Increase victim access to psychiatric care, as necessary, including psychiatric evaluation and medication management services.
    Applicants to Purpose Area 3A must demonstrate that their proposed project was developed as a collaborative partnership between: (1) a state, local, tribal, or nonprofit crime victim services program; and (2) a state, local, tribal, or nonprofit mental health services provider program. Additionally, either the lead applicant, or its partner agency, must demonstrate its capacity to provide culturally competent services to the specific population to be served by the proposed project, through its organizational mission statement and/or the expertise and experience of the individuals who would staff the proposed project. If neither the lead applicant nor its partner possesses such expertise, then the collaborative partnership applying for the project should be expanded to include a nonprofit and/or community-based organization whose primary mission is to meet the specific health, safety, or general welfare needs of the underserved population that would be the recipient of the proposed services.

    Purpose Area 3B: Training and Technical Assistance: As part of the Vision 21 ISV Program, OVC will award a 36-month cooperative agreement to a qualified organization to provide TTA to up to three grantees who would receive funding under Purpose Area 3A. Any proposed strategy for delivering TTA to grant award recipients funded under Purpose Area 3A should include a comprehensive plan to increase the capacity of organizations participating in the funded project to increase access to mental health services to members of traditionally underserved populations.

    The award recipient under this purpose area will be required to devise a plan to deliver TTA to the grantees who receive funding under Purpose Area 3A. The following objectives support this goal:
    • Work with OVC to plan and conduct a 2-day in-person, grantee orientation conference, including: cooperating with OVC in identifying the location and dates for the meeting; cooperating with OVC and other DOJ components in obtaining approval for the costs associated with conducting the meeting; seeking OVC review and approval of the agenda and all presentation materials; procuring audio-visual equipment and support services; and managing all onsite logistics for the meeting;
    • Cooperate with OVC in devising a plan for ongoing TTA for all grantees through a combination of: periodic webinars and/or conference calls; annual, 2-day in-person meetings in years 2 through 4 of the award period; and annual onsite visits to each of the three grantees;
    • Provide training to grantees and their partner agencies designed to increase multicultural understanding and competency and strengthen their capacity to provide services that meet the needs of diverse populations;
    • Provide technical guidance to grantees on completing the required community needs assessment and strategic plan;
    • Conduct individual assessment of each grantee’s TTA needs and provide written report to OVC and the grantee; and
    • Develop and implement a customized plan for the delivery of TTA to each grantee through a combination of remote and onsite methods; and
    • Devise a strategy to develop peer-to-peer mentoring and support among grant award recipients.
LINK to RFP: https://ojp.gov/ovc/grants/pdftxt/FY2017-V21-Mental-Health-508.pdf

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Office of Minority Health (OMH)
Empowered Communities for a Healthier Nation Initiative (ECI)


DEADLINE: Applications due: August 1, 2017 by 5 pm ET.

AWARD: Awards between $300,000 and $350,000 per year for up to three years.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: Up to 16 awards.

ELIGIBILITY: Eligible applicants that can apply for this funding opportunity are listed below:

  • State, county, city, township and special district governments
  • Independent school districts
  • Private, Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
  • Native American tribal governments and organizations including Tribal Epidemiology Centers
  • Public Housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
  • Nonprofits with or without a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS
  • For profit organizations, including small business
TARGET POPULATION: The ECI program is intended to provide support for minority and/or disadvantaged communities disproportionately impacted by the opioid epidemic, childhood/adolescent obesity, or serious mental illness.

SUMMARY: The ECI program seeks to prevent opioid abuse, increase access to opioid treatment and recovery services, and reduce the health consequences of opioid abuse; reduce obesity prevalence and disparities in weight status among children and adolescents; and reduce the impact of serious mental illness and improve screening for serious mental illness at the primary care level. The ECI seeks to demonstrate the effectiveness of collaborations that include academic medical centers, prevention research centers, teaching hospitals, or Tribal epidemiology centers, and community based organizations to reduce significant health disparities impacting minorities and disadvantaged populations through the implementation of evidence-based interventions and promising practices with the greatest potential for impact.

Each application should address only one of the three focus areas of the ECl program: opioid abuse; childhood/adolescent obesity; or serious mental illness. OMH will consider only one application per organization for each focus area.

1. Opioid Abuse
Projects addressing this focus area must target efforts to minority and/or disadvantaged communities most affected by the opioid crisis. For the ECI program, minority and/or disadvantaged communities most affected by the opioid crisis are those within (i) counties with more than 19.9% of persons living in poverty as defined by the U.S. Census Bureau, OR (ii) counties with violent crime rates in excess of 400 per 100,000 population; AND (iii) counties or states for which county or state data indicate high nonfatal or fatal opioid overdose rates.

Each project must implement one or both of the following community-level strategies:
  1. prevent opioid abuse and increase access to treatment and recovery services and overdose reversal capacity in rural and/or urban areas by using strategies that employ evidence-based interventions including each of the following:
    • training and education of providers, pharmacists, and the public about opioid overdose prevention and reversal, naloxone administration, and availability of naloxone via standing orders at community pharmacies and other community-based organizations;
    • training of primary care providers in screening and diagnosis of opioid misuse and motivational interviewing or other evidence-based techniques to engage individuals in treatment, including medication-assisted treatment in the event of opioid overdose; and
    • strategies should include the following partners: local public health, substance abuse providers, the medical community, community-based prevention and risk reduction organizations, law enforcement in states with Good Samaritan laws, and may include faith-based organizations.
  2. identify and implement the most effective strategies to reach, engage, and retain people who inject drugs in substance abuse treatment, including, but not limited to, medication-assisted treatment, psychosocial therapies, and counseling for opioid use disorder, and identify innovative strategies to provide comprehensive services to people who inject drugs, including a focus on reducing the transmission of viral hepatitis and HIV, engaging in opioid use disorder treatment, and providing overdose prevention education and naloxone distribution in the community. These strategies must include the training of family and friends of people who inject drugs to increase the likelihood of effective use of life-saving treatment (e.g., naloxone administration) for persons who have overdosed.
2. Childhood/Adolescent Obesity
Projects addressing this focus area must target efforts to minority and/or disadvantaged communities with a high prevalence of childhood/adolescent obesity. Communities with high levels of childhood/adolescent obesity or children/adolescents at risk for obesity are those in which more than 20% of the children ages 2-19 years have a Body Mass Index (BMI) at or above the 85th percentile for children and teens of the same age and sex. Overweight is defined as a BMI at or above the 85th percentile and below the 95th percentile for children and teens of the same age and sex. Obesity is defined as a BMI at or above the 95th percentile for children and teens of the same age and sex.

Each project must implement family-centered strategies that reduce obesity and do one or both of the following:
  1. implement behavioral interventions to reduce recreational sedentary time and improve nutritional, physical activity and weight-related outcomes among children and adolescents.
  2. identify and implement the combinations of intervention components that are most effective for minority and/or disadvantaged children and determine which components are critical to success.
3. Serious Mental Illness
Projects addressing this focus area must target efforts to improve access to mental health services in minority and/or disadvantaged communities with a shortage of mental health professionals. An eligible applicant organization must target communities within a state, territory, and/or tribe(s) that is/are a Health Professional Shortage Area (HPSA) with a shortage of mental health providers. HPSAs with a shortage of mental health providers are designated by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) with a HPSA score of 16 or higher.

Each project must seek to improve the rates of routine screening for mental disorders in primary care settings by primary care providers and link or provide persons diagnosed with serious mental illness with mental health treatment through collaborative care networks, including through the use of telemedicine/telehealth services, and improve health outcomes by employing one or more of the following:
  1. increase providers' use of evidence-based protocols for the proactive management of diagnosed mental disorders;
  2. improve clinical and community support for active patient engagement in treatment goals setting and self-management.
LINK to RFP: https://www.grantsolutions.gov/gs/preaward/previewPublicAnnouncement.do?id=59100

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Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
First Responders - Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act (FR-CARA)


DEADLINE: Applications due: July 31, 2017.

AWARD: Anticipated total funding of up to $10,423,364 per year of which $6,000,000 will be for entities serving rural communities with high rates of opioid abuse with individual awards of $250,000 – $800 000 per year for up to four years.

  • States - Up to $800,000 per year.
  • Local Governmental Entity - Up to $500,000 per year.
  • Tribe or Tribal Organization - Up to $250,000 per year.
NUMBER OF AWARDS: Up to 30 awards.

ELIGIBILITY: States, local governmental entities (including, but not limited to, municipal corporations, counties, cities, boroughs, incorporated towns, and townships), and Indian tribes and tribal organizations.

TARGET POPULATION: First responders including: firefighters, law enforcement officers, paramedics, emergency medical technicians, or other legally organized and recognized volunteer organizations that respond to adverse opioid related incidents.

SAMHSA will use discretion in allocating funding for these awards, taking into consideration whether the project will be implemented in rural or non-rural geographic areas.

For entities applying as part of the Rural Set-aside, the states, tribes and tribal organizations, and local governments must identify how the community where the project will be implemented is not located in metropolitan statistical areas (as defined by the Office of Management and Budget) and has a high rate of substance abuse. Grantees must be able to identify a catchment area that:
  1. Is a specific geographically defined area not located in metropolitan statistical areas (as defined by the Office of Management and Budget); and
  2. Has been disproportionately impacted by opioid abuse as evidenced by high rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and other opioids.
SUMMARY: The purpose of this program is to allow first responders and members of other key community sectors to administer a drug or device approved or cleared under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act for emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose. Grantees will train and provide resources to first responders and members of other key community sectors at the local governmental and tribal levels on carrying and administering a drug or device approved or cleared under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act for emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose. Grantees will also establish processes, protocols, and mechanisms for referral to appropriate treatment and recovery communities.

SAMHSA expects grantees to use grant funds to support the following activities:
  • Make a drug or device approved or cleared under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act for emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose available to be carried and administered by first responders and members of other key community sectors;
  • Train and provide resources for first responders and members of other key community sectors on carrying and administering a drug or device approved or cleared under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act for emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose; and
  • Establish processes, protocols, and mechanisms for referral to appropriate treatment and recovery communities, which may include an outreach coordinator or team to connect individuals receiving opioid overdose reversal drugs to follow-up services.
Grantees are required to form or join an established advisory council that meets the requirements of the grant. If the grantee chooses to join an established advisory council, the grantee must establish a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the existing council that ensures that the FR-CARA requirements will be met.

The advisory council must include representatives from:
  • The Office of the Governor or Chief Executive Officer, tribal council, or office of the local chief executive, as applicable; and
  • A core group of agencies identified by the grantee that must include agencies currently engaged in efforts to prevent prescription drug/opioid overdose-related deaths. This may include first responders, entities that distribute FDA-approved overdose reversal drugs, and representatives of agencies and organizations responsible for substance abuse treatment and recovery support services.
LINK to RFP: https://www.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/grants/pdf/sp-17-005.pdf

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Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Improving Access to Overdose Treatment (OD Treatment Access)


DEADLINE: Applications due: July 31, 2017.

AWARD: Up to $1,000,000 per year for up to five years.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: One award.

ELIGIBILITY: SAMHSA is limiting eligibility to Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs), Opioid Treatment Program, or practioner who has a waiver to prescribe buprenorphine.

TARGET POPULATION: Persons at high risk for overdose.

SUMMARY: SAMHSA will award OD Treatment Access funds to a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC), Opioid Treatment Program, or practioner who has a waiver to prescribe buprenorphine to expand access to Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs or devices for emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose. The grantee will partner with other prescribers at the community level to develop best practices for prescribing and co-prescribing FDA-approved overdose reversal drugs. After developing best practices, the grantee will train other prescribers in key community sectors as well as individuals who support persons at high risk for overdose.

In 2013, SAMHSA released the Opioid Overdose Prevention Toolkit to help reduce the number of opioid-related overdose deaths and adverse events. The OD Treatment Access grant program will utilize this toolkit and other resources to help the grantee train and provide resources for health care providers and pharmacists on the prescribing of drugs or devices approved or cleared under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act for emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose.

The OD Treatment Access grant program will also ensure the grantee establishes protocols to connect patients who have experienced a drug overdose with appropriate treatment, including medication-assisted treatment and appropriate counseling and behavioral therapies.

Required Activities: OD Treatment Access grant funds must be used primarily to support the following activities:

  • Establish a program for prescribing a drug or device approved or cleared under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act for emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose.
  • Train and provide resources for health care providers and pharmacists on the prescribing of drugs or devices approved or cleared under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act for emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose.
  • Establish protocols to connect patients who have experienced a drug overdose with appropriate treatment, including medication-assisted treatment, and appropriate counseling and behavioral therapies.
  • Develop a plan for sustaining the program after Federal support for the program has ended.
  • Use SAMHSA’s Opioid Overdose Prevention Toolkit as a guide to develop and implement a comprehensive prevention program to reduce the number of prescription drug/opioid overdose-related deaths and adverse events among cases of known or suspected opioid overdose.
No more than 20 percent of the grant award may be used for the following:
  • Purchase drugs or devices approved or cleared under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act for emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose, for distribution under the program.
  • Offset the co-payments and other cost sharing associated with drugs or devices approved or cleared under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act for emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose.
Allowable Activities: SAMHSA’s OD Treatment Access grant may also support the following types of activities:
  • Collaboration with healthcare providers and pharmacists to educate them on overdose dangers, and to recommend that they consider providing standing orders for FDA-approved overdose reversal drugs to patients and individuals who support person at high-risk for overdose.
  • Collaboration with pharmacies to distribute FDA-approved overdose reversal drugs, if permitted by state law.
  • Public education on any state “Good Samaritan” laws, such as those that permit bystanders to alert emergency responders to an overdose or to administer FDA-approved overdose reversal drugs without fear of civil or criminal penalties.
LINK to RFP: https://www.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/grants/pdf/sp-17-006.pdf

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Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Targeted Capacity Expansion: Medication Assisted Treatment – Prescription Drug and Opioid Addiction (MAT-PDOA)


DEADLINE: Applications due: July 31, 2017.

AWARD: Anticipated total funding of $28 million:

  • Up to $2 million per year for eligible states (if using a certified Electronic Health Record (EHR) system or if using a non-certified EHR system but planning to certify) for up to three years.
  • Up to $1.9 million per year for eligible states (if not using a certified EHR system or using a non-certified system with no plan to certify) for up to three years.
NUMBER OF AWARDS: Up to five awards.

ELIGIBILITY: Eligibility is limited to 17 states identified with having the highest rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and opioids per capita and includes those with the most dramatic increases for heroin and opioids, as identified by SAMHSA’s Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS): 2007 – 2014. These states are: Alabama, California, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, Nevada, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, and Utah.

The application must be submitted by the Single State Agency (SSA) for Substance Abuse within the state.

FY 2015 MAT-PDOA grantees funded under announcement TI-15-007 and FY 2016 MAT-PDOA grantees funded under announcement TI-16-014 are not eligible to apply for this program.

TARGET POPULATION: Persons with an opioid use disorder seeking or receiving MAT in states identified with having the highest rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and opioids per capita and states with the most dramatic increases for heroin and opioids.

SUMMARY: The purpose of this program is to expand/enhance access to medication-assisted treatment (MAT) services for persons with an opioid use disorder seeking or receiving MAT. This program targets states identified with having the highest rates of primary treatment admissions for heroin and opioids per capita and includes those states with the most dramatic increases for heroin and opioids, based on SAMHSA’s Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS): 2007 – 2014. The desired outcomes include: 1) an increase in the number of admissions for MAT; 2) an increase in the number of clients receiving integrated care/treatment; 3) a decrease in illicit opioid drug use at six-month follow-up; and 4) a decrease in the use of prescription opioids in a non-prescribed manner at six-month follow-up.

For the purpose of this FOA, integrated care/treatment is defined as the organized delivery and/or coordination of medical (including the use of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs [buprenorphine, methadone, extended release injectable naltrexone] for addiction), behavioral, social, peer, and other recovery support services provided to individual patients who have multiple healthcare needs in order to produce better overall health outcomes. MAT is defined as the use of FDA-approved opioid agonist medications (e.g., methadone, buprenorphine products, including buprenorphine/naloxone combination formulations and buprenorphine mono-product formulations) for the maintenance treatment of opioid use disorder and opioid antagonist medication (e.g., extended-release) in combination with behavioral therapies to prevent relapse to opioid use. MAT includes screening, assessment (which includes determination of severity of opioid use disorder, including presence of physical dependence and appropriateness for MAT), and case management. MAT is to be provided in combination with comprehensive opioid use disorder treatment, including but not limited to: counseling, behavioral therapies, other clinically appropriate services in order for individuals to achieve and maintain abstinence from all opioids and heroin, and, when needed, pharmacotherapy for co-occurring alcohol use disorder. MAT is to be provided in a clinically driven, person-centered, and individualized setting.

SAMHSA expects grantees to provide an array of MAT services, integrated care, peer, and other recovery supports designed to decrease the use of opioids and reduce the risk of overdose among the population(s) of focus. Grantees are expected to prioritize treatment regimens that are less susceptible to diversion for illicit purposes.

MAT services must be provided either by the grantee and/or via sub-awards to domestic public entities (e.g., local health departments), private nonprofit entities (e.g., community-based organizations), and/or for-profit entities that are responsible for administering behavioral health services directly or through contractual agreements. These provider entities may be, but are not limited to, the following: substance abuse or mental disorder treatment provider agencies, health centers, Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs), primary care, or other agencies that serve the population(s) of focus that can meet the requirements specified in this FOA.

Applicants must identify a minimum of two state-determined high-risk communities and partner with local governments and/or community-based organizations to address the needs in these communities. Applicants are required to use evidence-based practices (EBPs) for all screening, assessment, and interventions.

Required Activities: Grantees must ensure that coordinated and integrated care provided to enrolled patients include the following required activities:
  • Prioritization of treatment regimens that are less susceptible to diversion.
  • Outreach and engagement strategies to increase participation in, and access to, MAT for diverse populations at risk for opioid use disorder.
  • Assessment to determine diagnostic criteria for opioid use disorders relative to MAT, including determination of opioid dependence, a history of opioid dependence, or high risk of relapse.
  • Establish and implement a plan to mitigate the risk of diversion and ensure the appropriate use/dose of medication by patients.
  • Direct provision of MAT (the use of FDA-approved medications in combination with behavioral therapies) as defined in this FOA. MAT provided for only medical withdrawal (detoxification) does not qualify for the use of grant funds.
  • Providing peer and other recovery support services designed to improve access and retention in MAT. [Note: Grant funds may be used to purchase such services from another provider.]
  • Screening and assessment for co-occurring disorders and the coordination, or delivery when not otherwise available and accessible to the individual, of services determined to be necessary for the individual patient to achieve and sustain recovery.
  • Use of the state Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP), where available, for each new patient admission throughout engagement with grant-funded services and in compliance with any relevant state rules or regulations.
  • Key staff (Project Director) is expected to contribute to the programmatic development or execution of your project in a substantive and measurable way.
Allowable Activities: Other allowable direct services include the following types of activities:
  • Limited outreach and screening to identify incarcerated individuals who are within four months from release and may benefit from MAT services upon release from a jail or detention facility.
  • Education, screening, care coordination, risk reduction interventions, and counseling for HIV/AIDS, hepatitis, and other infectious diseases.
The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act places strong emphasis on the widespread adoption and implementation of electronic health record (EHR) technology. Accordingly, all SAMHSA grantees that provide clinical services to individuals are encouraged to demonstrate ongoing use of a certified EHR system in each year of their SAMHSA grant. Applicants may apply for $1,000,000 annually (rather than $950,000 annually) if one of the two conditions below is satisfied:
  • Use of a certified EHR (an electronic health record system that has been tested and certified by an approved ONC certifying body).
  • If your organization currently is using an EHR system that is not certified by ONC, demonstrate the implementation of the plan to gain certification.
LINK to RFP: https://www.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/grants/pdf/ti-17-017.pdf

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Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA)
Cooperative Agreements to Implement Zero Suicide in Health Systems (Zero Suicide)


DEADLINE: Applications due: July 18, 2017.

AWARD: Total available funding of $7.9 million ($2 million for tribes and tribal organizations):

  • Up to $700,000 per year for states, the District of Columbia, and U.S. Territories.
  • Up to $400,000 per year for tribes and tribal organizations; community-based primary care or behavioral health care organizations; emergency departments; and local public health agencies.
For up to five years.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: Up to 13 awards.

ELIGIBILITY: States, the District of Columbia, or U.S. Territories health agencies with mental and/or behavioral health functions; an Indian tribe or tribal organization; community-based primary care or behavioral health care organizations; emergency departments; local public health agencies.

TARGET POPULATION: Individuals who are 25 years of age or older at risk for suicide.

SUMMARY: The Zero Suicide model is a comprehensive, multi-setting approach to suicide prevention in health systems. The purpose of this program is to implement suicide prevention and intervention programs, for individuals who are 25 years of age or older, that are designed to raise awareness of suicide, establish referral processes, and improve care and outcomes for such individuals who are at risk for suicide. Grantees will implement the Zero Suicide model throughout their health system. Health systems that do not provide direct care services may partner with agencies that can implement the Zero Suicide model. For communities without well-developed behavioral health care services, the Zero Suicide model may be implemented in Federally Qualified Health Centers or other primary care settings.

The Zero Suicide model has seven essential elements of suicide care:
  • Lead - Create a leadership-driven, safety-oriented culture committed to dramatically reducing suicide among people under care. Include survivors of suicide attempts and suicide loss in leadership and planning roles;
  • Train - Develop a competent, confident, and caring workforce;
  • Identify - Systematically identify and assess suicide risk among people receiving care;
  • Engage - Ensure every individual has a pathway to care that is both timely and adequate to meet his or her needs. Include collaborative safety planning and restriction of lethal means;
  • Treat - Use effective, evidence-based treatments that directly target suicidal thoughts and behaviors;
  • Transition - Provide continuous contact and support, especially after acute care; and
  • Improve - Apply a data-driven, quality improvement approach to inform system changes that will lead to improved patient outcomes and better care for those at risk.
By addressing all elements of the Zero Suicide model, health care providers will transform their health system to one that is ready to identify, treat, refer, and ensure continuity of care for individuals at risk for suicide and suicidal behaviors.

Required Activities:
You must use SAMHSA’s services grant funds primarily to support direct services. This includes the following activities:
  • Screen all individuals receiving care for suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Conduct a comprehensive risk assessment of individuals identified at risk for suicide, and ensure reassessment as appropriate.
  • Implement effective, evidence-based treatments that specifically treat suicidal ideation and behaviors. Clinical staff must be trained to provide direct treatment in suicide prevention and evaluate individual outcomes throughout the treatment process.
  • Transform health systems to include a leadership-driven, safety-oriented culture committed to dramatically reducing suicide among people under care, and to accept and embed the Zero Suicide model within their agencies.
  • Train the health care workforce in suicide prevention evidence-based, best-practice services relevant to their position, including the identification, assessment, management and treatment, and evaluation of individuals throughout the overall process.
  • Ensure that the most appropriate, least restrictive treatment and support is provided, including brief intervention and follow-up from crisis, respite and residential care, and partial or full hospitalization.
  • Develop a Suicide Care Management Plan for every individual identified as at-risk of suicide and continuously monitor the individual’s progress through their electronic health record (EHR) or other data management system, and adjust treatment as necessary. The Suicide Care Management Plan must include the following:
    • Protocols for safety planning and reducing access to lethal means;
    • Rapid follow-up of adults who have attempted suicide or experienced a suicidal crisis after being discharged from a treatment facility e.g., local emergency departments, inpatient psychiatric facilities, including direct linkage with appropriate health care agencies to ensure coordinated care services are in place.
    • Protocols to ensure client safety, especially among high-risk adults in healthcare systems who have attempted suicide, experienced a suicidal crisis, and/or have a serious mental illness. This must include outreach telephone contact within 24 to 48 hours after discharge and securing an appointment within 1 week of discharge.
  • Work with Veterans Health Administration (VHA) and community-based outpatient clinics, state department of veteran affairs, and national SAMHSA and Veterans Administration (VA) suicide prevention resources to engage and intervene with veterans at risk for suicide but not currently receiving VA services. This includes veterans contacting local Lifeline crisis centers, sub-acute crisis services, and community emergency departments.
  • Develop and implement a plan that assures attention to preventing suicide among those receiving treatment for serious mental illness (SMI), such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, and for services designed for those with SMI, such as assertive community treatment and assisted outpatient treatment.
  • For State applicants, ensure that at least 70 percent of the Suicide Prevention Lifeline calls are answered by a Suicide Prevention Lifeline Crisis center within the state from which the call originated, excluding callers who press “1” to be connected to the Veterans Crisis Line.
  • Ensure feedback and leadership of survivors of suicide attempts and suicide loss are involved in all required activities.
LINK to RFP: https://www.samhsa.gov/sites/default/files/grants/pdf/sm-17-006.pdf

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