Below are recent RFPs and funding opportunities.  Please click on any of the titles to find the details of the funding application.  For recent news in the field, please click here.

If you are interested in applying for a federal grant, and seek assistance in writing an innovative and competitive narrative, consider using SAE to help develop the narrative of your application. Also, an important notice that all applicants must have updated DUNS number and SAM registration when applying through Grants.gov. If this process is new to you, please start it immediately, as it can take up to two weeks to obtain each of these. For instructions on how to obtain a DUNS number and SAM registration, go to grants.gov's Organization Registration page.

Current Requests for Proposals


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Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA)
A National Training and Technical Assistance Initiative to Improve Police-Based Responses to People with Mental Health Disorders and Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities


DEADLINE: Applications due: August 22, 2017.

AWARD: BJA expects to make up to one award with an estimated total amount awarded of up to $2.5 million for a 12-month period of performance, to begin on October 1, 2017.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: One award.

ELIGIBILITY: Eligible applicants are public or private organizations, nonprofit and for-profit organizations (including tribal nonprofit and for-profit organizations), and public universities and colleges (including tribal institutions of higher education). For-profit organizations (as well as other recipients) must forgo any profit or management fee.

It is expected that the successful applicant will have significant experience with collaboration between police/law enforcement and MHD and IDD service delivery systems, either through demonstrated experience and expertise of existing or proposed staff or through proposed partnership(s) between organizations. A competitive application must also include representation from groups representing consumers of MHD and IDD services as well as their family members.

Competitive applicants will demonstrate experience with providing training and technical assistance (TTA) to police/law enforcement agencies and organizations that serve people with mental health disorders, co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders, and people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

This demonstrated expertise should include delivering and managing strategic planning services and training to police agencies, as well as experience funding and delivering services to people with mental health disorders, co-occurring substance use and mental health disorders, and intellectual and developmental disabilities. In particular, the applicant must have demonstrated past experience in working with state and or local governments, police and mental health systems, organizations for people with intellectual disabilities/developmental disabilities, criminal justice systems and an understanding of such systems and organizations, their operation, organizational structure, culture, and environment.

TARGET POPULATION: People with MHD and IDD who come in contact with police.

SUMMARY: To support police and law enforcement agencies and their MHD and IDD service delivery partners to build capacity to improve their collaborative responses, BJA will support a National Training and Technical Assistance Center to Improve Police-Based Responses to People with MHD and IDD (National Center). The National Center will assist BJA to coordinate and build upon existing assets and resources described above to serve police agencies and their mental health and social service partners. Many of the resources that BJA offers can be adapted and maximized with specific training and technical assistance for implementation. Without TTA, agencies must implement resources in the community without specific guidance, planning, assessment, contextualization, and knowledge about best practices for implementation.

The goal of the National Center is to build state, local, and tribal governments’ capacity to develop, implement, sustain, track, and assist police and law enforcement in having effective responses to people with MHD and IDD. In addition to fostering more effective collaboration, the Centers work will support public and officer safety.

BJA is seeking to fund a national TTA provider with demonstrated ability to build and enhance police and mental health system and responder capacity to improve law enforcement responses and outcomes for people with MHD and IDD.

This provider must demonstrate the ability to work swiftly, at a high level, and strategically to address the needs of the field. A successful applicant will provide a robust list of subject matter experts and demonstrate the ability to locate other subject matter experts as the need arises. In addition to general law enforcement expertise, the applicant should ensure that it has or can access prosecutorial expertise to support a truly collaborative approach to this problem.

With guidance from BJA the provider will:

Objective 1: Develop and manage a TTA delivery system to build capacity among police and partner MHD and IDD service delivery systems to improve responses to and outcomes for people with MHD and IDD. Based on a robust assessment phase, assist departments in identifying strengths and opportunities that will create the foundation of a program implementation strategy.

Deliverables:

  • Develop and execute a protocol to assess a jurisdiction’s current police response to people with MHD and IDD, including strength of existing partnership with MHD and IDD service delivery systems. The grantee will be expected to incorporate and build upon existing BJA tools to determine the current strength and capacity of the existing police/MHD and IDD strategies to include: review of existing policy and practice, documentation of collaboration, strength of information sharing and data collection, and ability to track outcomes.
  • Use the PMHC Toolkit to market and receive requests for services.
  • Develop a process to triage jurisdictions and provide appropriate resources to meet their needs based on the result of assessment outcomes, including swift, customized, and strategic technical assistance, to include onsite support when appropriate.
  • Assist communities to identify gaps in MHD and IDD service availability and treatment capacity to meet the needs of the subset of this population that comes into contact with police and law enforcement agencies.
  • Identify and expose TTA sites to best practices and provide technical expertise to plan and map a strategy; determine prerequisite steps and prioritize needs and strategies to overcome challenges as identified together by the local/state/tribal partner’s police, MHD and IDD partners.
  • Establish goals and evaluate performance of comprehensive response plans, including follow-up with jurisdictions on progress toward implementing TTA recommendations.
Objective 2: Develop Police/Law Enforcement/Prosecutor MHD and IDD champions to serve as TTA consultants to triaged jurisdictions, and to provide accurate and comprehensive information in response to state, local, and tribal requests. This “on demand” service will ensure BJA has the requisite expertise on hand to respond to field requests for the best information and strategies surrounding Police/Law Enforcement MHD-IDD initiatives.

Deliverables:
  • Provide on-demand TTA for agencies contacting the National Center for specific TTA needs related to improving police-based responses to people with MHD and IDD.
  • Meet and collaborate with BJA and others to enhance resources and knowledge, and leverage the respective expertise of partners in responding to the needs of the field.
  • Engage and broker nationally recognized speakers with expert knowledge as it relates to responding to people with MHD and IDD.
  • Upon BJA’s recommendation and approval, the TTA provider will meet with or coordinate with nationally recognized authors, academics, police executives, MHD and IDD professionals, advocacy professionals, and people with MHD/IDD, their family members, and others to form an expert and deployable speakers’ bureau.
Objective 3: Develop and pilot a Police/Law Enforcement Executives Curriculum that increases executive leadership’s involvement to apply their knowledge and understanding of responding to people with MHD/IDD and administrating agency impact with and without a PMHC.

Deliverables:
  • Create and execute a leadership training and problem-solving curriculum for police executive leadership that promotes evidence-based practice, skill development, and improved management of comprehensive community strategies to respond to people with MHD and IDD. Address topic areas specific to police executive leadership such as how to:
    • Plan for a problem-solving discussion with police leadership that considers challenges external to the agency and administrative challenges that are internal to the agency. Through leadership input, develop outcomes to address identified challenges.
    • Plan for ongoing leadership commitment and sustainment of a comprehensive strategy to respond to people with MHD and IDD.
    • Develop lasting partnerships with leadership and MHD and IDD service delivery systems.
    • Plan a process to routinely track agency performance using data on key measures.
    • Design policies and procedures that incorporate warm hand offs to MHD and IDD service delivery systems and alternatives to arrest when appropriate.
    • Identify, develop, and sustain the most appropriate training and education for all relevant personnel.
    • Gather and maintain inventories of behavioral health resources, processes utilized across law enforcement and behavioral health agencies, and needs assessments.
    • Plan for prioritizing funding to address identified needs, reducing treatment gaps, and improving coordination between community partners.
  • Develop specific tools and reference material for supervisors, middle management officers, and other community leaders that act as co-responders in crisis situations such as behavioral health, fire departments, and emergency management services.
Objective 4: Plan and host a national convening of innovators and leaders in the field to share and build knowledge about what is promising and working to lessen and improve police/law enforcement/prosecutor contact with people with MHD and IDD and develop a communications strategy for information sharing between justice leaders/practitioners and MHD and IDD service delivery partners at the state, local, and tribal level.

Deliverables:
  • Convene a meeting of leaders and innovators, including representatives from jurisdictions with unique technology solutions to identify multisystem frequent users, match available services to people in need, and appropriate for assessment/diversion.
  • Develop a mechanism to identify innovations, and where appropriate educate about and scale up promising approaches to improved safety, increased access to MHD and IDD services, decreased repeat encounters with police/law enforcement, reduced costs, and improved community relations.
  • Drive technology solutions for information sharing between MHD and IDD service delivery system providers, police/law enforcement, emergency services, and jails to better communicate important real time data.
Objective 5: Develop, in partnership with BJA and other federal agencies as relevant, a research agenda that considers the current research base, identifies gaps in knowledge, and lays out and prioritizes scalable research/evaluation options. The plan should consider what works to solidify partnerships between police/law enforcement and MHD and IDD service delivery systems, PMHC training programs (considerations should include who gets trained, when they are trained, how training is delivered, length of training, and necessity/frequency of booster training), officer peer supports, implementation science, and information/data sharing.

Deliverables:
  • Convene multidisciplinary researchers and practitioners to consider and design a research agenda.
  • Identify research gaps and data that is needed to make informed decisions at the state, county, and local level.
  • Build researcher capacity to serve as partners in action research models that assess and provide collaborative police/law enforcement and MHD and IDD service delivery system partners with close to real time feedback on implementation and results and drive solutions for course corrections when necessary.
  • Consult with researchers to use evidence-based strategies, collect data, and assess needs in order to provide fidelity to strategic plans for improving the collaboration of the criminal justice system with local, county, and state health systems in response to people with MHD and IDD.
  • Complete a research agenda that examines model approaches to responding to people with MHD and IDD such as CIT, Co-responder teams, Mobile Crisis teams, and Tailored/Customized approaches. Develop a research proposal that considers as goals:
  • Improved Safety
  • Increased Access to Behavioral Healthcare
  • Decreased Repeat Encounters with the Criminal Justice System
  • Reduced Costs
  • Improved Community Relations
Objective 6: Coordinate, market, and deliver BJA products and tools as well as other vetted products, tools, methods, and models relative to police-based responses to MHD and IDD. Oversee the content development, production, and maintenance of online media products and tools such as the PMHC Toolkit.

Deliverables:
  • Develop a process to gather and keep current content and information available through the PMHC Toolkit. Identify, curate, and maintain on the PMHC Toolkit: relevant policy papers, publications, articles, and reports or other data from local, state, national, and federal sources for the field at large that highlight/demonstrate research and innovative, promising, and evidence-based approaches to respond/divert/treat people with MHDs and IDDs who are involved in the justice system.
  • Gather existing BJA assets pertinent to police responses to people with MHDs and IDDs and adapt to the existing modular PMHC Toolkit format.
  • Standardize products for online and mobile environments and ensure excellence in their delivery.
  • Develop communication strategies to improve national awareness and knowledge of best practices in police mental health collaboration, information sharing, data capacity, and connections to treatment. This communication strategy is key to ensuring all of the above referenced work is offered regularly and routinely to the field. It will ensure a constant online and in-person presence for BJA to support the field.
Objective 7: Assist in professionalizing, marketing, facilitating, and tracking BJA’s expanded law enforcement-mental health learning sites and manage the demand for onsite visits.

Deliverables:
  • Work with BJA and an existing TTA provider to expand and market the number and geographic diversity of mental health/law enforcement learning sites, which currently are select sites that serve as models to other jurisdictions around the country of effective, specialized police-based responses.
  • Expand the scope of the learning sites to include peer-to-peer learning though Police-Disability Response Teams as developed by the National Arc’s Pathways to Justice Program.
  • Develop and disseminate articles, publications, materials, webinars, and guides as needed to reinforce information exchange between learning sites.
  • Create a professional business process to manage agency visits through planning for and development of learning objectives, agenda development, 90-day follow up on agency implementation of learning objectives, and pre-and post-learning assessments to gauge change regarding material learned.
  • Add to and grow a standardized information packet to make available to interested agencies regarding the learning sites.
Objective 8: Coordinate with BJA’s existing TTA providers to ensure consistency, knowledge, awareness and best use of existing resources and assets. This objective ensures swift responses to requests for technical assistance and develops a coordination capacity so that BJA can ensure the most applicable TTA available nationally is appropriately offered to the field.

Deliverables:
  • Collaborate with all BJA TTA providers that contribute to improving police and law enforcement responses to people with MHD and IDD. Upon BJA’s recommendation and approval, the grantee will meet with or coordinate with other BJA programs, federal agencies, and TTA providers in an effort to collaborate and coordinate services and technical support across offices and departments.
  • Connect interested jurisdictions to BJA resources and relevant providers.
  • Engage proactively with current and future BJA grantees and TTA providers to assess progress, address challenges, and identify lessons learned to share with the field.
  • Collect, maintain, and disseminate information about effective policies, programmatic practices, and trends relevant to police and MHD and IDD service delivery system collaboration.
LINK to RFP: https://www.bja.gov/funding/LEMHTTA17.pdf

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Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC)
Integrated HIV Surveillance and Prevention Programs for Health Departments


DEADLINE: Application due: September 13, 2017.

Recommended for Demonstration Projects only, but not required Letter of Intent (LOI) due: July 11, 2017.

AWARD: Total project period funding available of $2,000,000,000 and total annual funding of $399,292,872.

Component A: Core Program awards of at least $1,000,000 and Component B: Demonstration Projects funding ranges of:

  • $1,000,000 to $2,000,000 (approximately two (2) awards)
  • $500,000 to $1,000,000 (approximately six (6) awards)
  • up to $500,000 (approximately 12 awards)
NUMBER OF AWARDS: Component A: Core program - 61 awards

Component B: Demonstration Projects - 20 awards; the number of new awards are subject to the availability of funding and will be made based on program performance.

ELIGIBILITY: State, local, and/or territorial health departments currently funded under funding opportunity announcements PS12-1201: Comprehensive Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Prevention Programs for Health Departments and PS13-1302: National HIV Surveillance System (NHSS).

Eligible applicants include state, local and territorial health departments or their Bona Fide Agents currently funded under PS12-1201 or PS13-1302. This includes the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Also eligible are the local (county or city) health departments serving the following metropolitan areas: Baltimore City, Chicago, Fulton County (Atlanta), Houston, Los Angeles County, Philadelphia, New York City, and San Francisco.

TARGET POPULATION: Persons living with HIV (PLWH) and HIV-negative persons at risk for HIV infection. Applicants must provide HIV services to target population(s) among those identified within their local or state Integrated HIV Prevention and Care Plan, Needs Assessment, and/or Epidemiologic Profile as being people living with and at greatest risk of HIV infection. Applicants should also include social determinants data to identify communities that are disproportionately affected by HIV and plan activities to reduce or eliminate these disparities. Disparities by race, ethnicity, gender identity, sexual orientation, geography, socioeconomic status, disability status, primary language, health literacy, and other relevant dimensions such as tribal communities should be considered.

SUMMARY: CDC announces the availability of fiscal year 2018 funds for a cooperative agreement for health departments to implement an integrated HIV surveillance and prevention program. The purpose of this funding opportunity announcement (FOA) is to implement a comprehensive HIV surveillance and prevention program to prevent new HIV infections and achieve viral suppression among persons living with HIV. In particular, the FOA promotes and supports improving health outcomes for persons living with HIV through achieving and sustaining viral suppression, and reducing health-related disparities by using quality, timely, and complete surveillance and program data to guide HIV prevention efforts. These goals are in accordance with the national prevention goals, HIV Care Continuum, and CDC’s High-Impact HIV Prevention (HIP) approach.

The integration of these programs allows each jurisdiction to operate in unison and maximize the impact of federal HIV prevention funding. An integrated FOA strengthens implementation of HIP by further allowing health departments to align resources to better match the geographic burden of HIV infections within their jurisdictions and improve data collection and use for public health action.

The FOA priorities are to increase individual knowledge of HIV status, prevent new infections among HIV-negative persons, reduce transmission from persons living with HIV, and strengthen interventional surveillance to enhance response capacity and intensive data-to-care activities to support sustained viral suppression.

Priority activities include (but are not limited to) HIV testing; linkage to, re-engagement in, and retention in care and support achieving viral suppression; pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) related activities; community-level HIV prevention activities; HIV transmission cluster investigations and outbreak response efforts.

Strategies and activities include: systematically collect, analyze, interpret, and disseminate HIV data to characterize trends in HIV infection, detect active HIV transmission, implement public health interventions, and evaluate public health response; identify persons with HIV infection and uninfected persons at risk for HIV infection; develop, maintain, and implement plans to respond to HIV transmission clusters and outbreaks; provide comprehensive HIV-related prevention services for persons living with diagnosed HIV infection (PLWH); provide comprehensive HIV-related prevention services for HIV-negative persons at risk for HIV infection; conduct perinatal HIV prevention and surveillance activities; conduct community-level HIV prevention activities; develop partnerships to conduct integrated HIV prevention and care planning; implement structural strategies to support and facilitate HIV surveillance and prevention; conduct data-driven planning, monitoring, and evaluation to continuously improve HIV programs; and build capacity for conducting effective HIV program activities, epidemiological science, and geocoding.

Expected short-term outcomes and required activities under Component A: Core Program include the following:
  1. Systematically collect, analyze, interpret, and disseminate HIV data to characterize trends in HIV infection, detect active HIV transmission, implement public health interventions, and evaluate public health response
    1. Outcome: Improved monitoring of trends in HIV infection
    2. Outcome: Improved completeness, timeliness, and quality of HIV surveillance and prevention program data
    3. Outcome: Increased ability to describe the geographic distribution of HIV and understand the social determinants of health in relation to HIV and HIV-related health disparities
  2. Identify persons with HIV infection and uninfected persons at risk for HIV infection
    1. Outcome: Increased number of persons who are aware of their HIV status
    2. Outcome: Increased participation in HIV partner services among persons with diagnosed HIV infection
  3. Develop, maintain, and implement a plan to respond to HIV transmission clusters and outbreaks
    1. Outcome: Improved early identification and investigation of HIV transmission clusters and outbreaks
    2. Outcome: Improved response to HIV transmission clusters and outbreaks
    3. Outcome: Improved plan and policies to respond to and contain HIV outbreaks
  4. Provide comprehensive HIV-related prevention services for persons living with diagnosed HIV infection
    1. Outcome: Increased linkage to and retention in HIV medical care among PLWH
    2. Outcome: Increased HIV viral load suppression among PLWH
  5. Provide comprehensive HIV-related prevention services for HIV-negative persons at risk for HIV infection
    1. Outcome: Increased referral of persons eligible for PrEP
  6. Conduct perinatal HIV prevention and surveillance activities
    1. Outcome: Reduced perinatally acquired HIV infection
    2. Outcome: Increased number of pregnant women aware of their HIV status
    3. Outcome: Improved completeness, timeliness, and quality of perinatal HIV surveillance data (for case and exposure reporting)
  7. Conduct community-level HIV prevention activities
    1. Outcome: Increased availability of condoms among persons living with or at risk for HIV infection
  8. Develop partnerships to conduct integrated HIV prevention and care planning
  9. Implement structural strategies to support and facilitate HIV surveillance and prevention
    1. Outcome: Increased data security, confidentiality, and sharing
  10. Conduct data-driven planning, monitoring, and evaluation to continuously improve HIV surveillance, prevention, and care activities
  11. Build capacity for conducting effective HIV program activities, epidemiological science, and geocoding
Component B: Demonstration Projects (Optional)
Applicants can enhance their programs by requesting funding to implement one demonstration project to expand high-impact HIV prevention and surveillance interventions and strategies. This funding will support implementation and structured evaluations of innovative programs or activities that are particularly novel or require additional resources for evaluation that would not normally be a part of implementing the required strategies and activities of the FOA. Project proposals should describe activities that are primarily focused on improving program, surveillance, and policy outcomes. Projects that are primarily research will not be eligible. Collaborations with local partners are encouraged (e.g., universities, CBOs, hospitals, clinics). Proposed projects must address the goals of reducing new HIV infections, improving health outcomes of PLWH, or reducing HIV-related disparities and health inequities.

Applicants may submit one proposal. The proposal must address how the applicant will implement and evaluate activities over the project period (up to four years), with more detailed information for activities conducted during the first year of funding.

LINK to RFP: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html, CDC-RFA-PS18-1802.

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Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
Choice Neighborhoods Planning Grants Program


DEADLINE: Applications Due: August 28, 2017.

AWARD: $5,000,000 is available through this NOFA. HUD anticipates awarding 3 Planning and Action Grants not to exceed $1.3 million each 3 1/2 years for Planning and Action Grants and 3 Planning Grants not to exceed $350,000 each 2 years for Planning Grants. By the end of the grant term, you are required to have matching funds in the amount of five percent of the grant amount in cash or in-kind donations.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: Approximately six awards total, 3 Planning and Action Grants, 3 Planning Grants.

ELIGIBILITY: Eligible applicants under this NOFA are Public Housing Authorities (PHAs), local governments, tribal entities, and nonprofits. Additionally:

  • Troubled Status for PHAs. This applies to PHA applicants. If a PHA was designated as troubled by HUD pursuant to section 6(j)(2) of the 1937 Act on the most recently released Operational Troubled List, HUD will use documents and information available to it to determine whether that PHA qualifies as an eligible applicant. PHAs designated as troubled are strongly encouraged to consider partnering with another entity (such as a local government or a nonprofit) to serve as the Lead Applicant for this Choice Neighborhoods grant. In accordance with section 24(j) of the 1937 Act, a troubled PHA may still be eligible to apply if it:
    • Is designated as troubled principally for reasons that will not affect its capacity to carry out a revitalization program;
    • Is making substantial progress toward eliminating the deficiencies of the agency that resulted in its troubled status;
    • Has not been found to be in noncompliance with fair housing or other civil rights requirements; or
    • Is otherwise determined by HUD to be capable of carrying out a revitalization program.
  • Certification for Multifamily Assisted Property Owners. If the Lead Applicant or Co-Applicant is the owner of the assisted property that is the subject of the Choice Neighborhoods activity grant, the Applicant is required to submit form HUD-2530, Previous Participation Certification. If the property listed has defaulted on a mortgage loan or has less than satisfactory review ratings (physical inspections, management and financial reviews), HUD will use documents and information available to it to determine whether the owner of the property qualifies as an eligible applicant. Approvals of entities that have defaulted or received unsatisfactory review ratings will be subjected to HUD’s Previous Participation clearance review process. Applicants may still be eligible to apply for Choice Neighborhoods funding if HUD deems the applicant to be making substantial progress in addressing the deficiencies related to such default or review rating. Multifamily assisted property owners with defaults or less than satisfactory review ratings are strongly encouraged to consider partnering with another entity (such as a local government or a nonprofit) to serve as the Lead Applicant for this Choice Neighborhoods grant. This requirement is not applicable to applications targeting public housing or Indian housing.
  • Nonprofit Applicant. For a nonprofit to demonstrate eligibility as a Lead or Co-Applicant, either an Internal Revenue Service determination letter indicating the organization’s 501(c) status or the letter from the state government or tribe designating the organization’s nonprofit status must be submitted in the attachments.
TARGET POPULATION: Each application must focus on the revitalization of at least one severely distressed public and/or assisted housing project. You must demonstrate in your application the targeted housing is eligible under this NOFA (i.e. is public and/or assisted housing) and meets the definition of severely distressed.

Eligible neighborhoods for Choice Neighborhoods grant funds are neighborhoods:
  1. with at least 20 percent of the residents estimated to be in poverty or have extremely low incomes based on the most recent data collected by the U.S. Census Bureau; and
  2. experiencing distress related to at least one of the following:
    1. high crime; defined as where either the Part I violent crime rate (measured as Part I Violent Crimes per 1000 persons) over the three years 2014-2016 is at least 1.5 times the per capita Part I violent crime rate (measured as Part I Violent Crimes per 1000 persons) of the city or, where no city data is available, county/parish in which the neighborhood is located over the same time frame; or the rate is greater than 18 crimes per 1000 persons; OR
    2. high vacancy or, for applications targeting Indian housing, substandard homes.
SUMMARY: The Choice Neighborhoods program leverages significant public and private dollars to support locally driven strategies that address struggling neighborhoods with distressed public or HUD-assisted housing through a comprehensive approach to neighborhood transformation. Local leaders, residents, and stakeholders, such as public housing authorities, cities, schools, police, business owners, nonprofits, and private developers, come together to create and implement a plan that revitalizes distressed HUD housing and addresses the challenges in the surrounding neighborhood. The program helps communities transform neighborhoods by redeveloping severely distressed public and/or HUD-assisted housing and catalyzing critical improvements in the neighborhood, including vacant property, housing, businesses, services and schools. To this end, Choice Neighborhoods is focused on three core goals:
  1. Housing: Replace distressed public and assisted housing with high-quality mixed-income housing that is well-managed and responsive to the needs of the surrounding neighborhood;
  2. People: Improve outcomes of households living in the target housing related to employment and income, health, and children’s education; and
  3. Neighborhood: Create the conditions necessary for public and private reinvestment in distressed neighborhoods to offer the kinds of amenities and assets, including safety, good schools, and commercial activity, that are important to families’ choices about their community.
To achieve these core goals, successful applicants must develop and implement a comprehensive neighborhood revitalization strategy, or “Transformation Plan.” This Transformation Plan becomes the guiding document for the revitalization of the public and/or assisted housing units, while simultaneously directing the transformation of the surrounding neighborhood.

Experience shows that to successfully develop and implement the Transformation Plan, broad engagement is needed. Successful applicants will need to work with public and private agencies, organizations (including philanthropic and civic organizations), and individuals to gather and leverage the financial and human capital resources needed to support the sustainability of the plan. These efforts should build community support for and involvement in the development and implementation of the plan.

Additionally, past revitalization efforts have demonstrated that even modest physical improvements and investment actions help communities build momentum for change and transition from planning to implementation of that plan. These actions improve neighborhood confidence, sustain the community’s energy, attract further engagement, and help convince skeptical stakeholders that positive change is possible. Successful applicants should undertake “doing while planning” projects, and when applicable, Action Activities, during the grant period.

Each Choice Neighborhoods grantee is expected to develop metrics based on the objectives listed below in order to measure performance. Grantees are encouraged to develop neighborhood revitalization plans with these objectives in mind:
  1. Housing Objectives: Housing transformed with the assistance of Choice Neighborhoods should be:
    • Well-Managed and Financially Viable. Developments that have budgeted appropriately for the rental income that can be generated from the project and meet or exceed industry standards for quality management and maintenance of the property.
    • Mixed-Income. Housing affordable to families and individuals with a broad range of incomes including low-income, moderate-income, and market rate or unrestricted.
    • Energy Efficient, Sustainable, Accessible, Healthy, and Free from Discrimination. Housing that is well-designed, embraces not only the requirements of accessible design but also concepts of visitability and universal design, has low per unit energy and water consumption and healthy indoor air quality, is built to be resistant to local disaster risk, has affordable broadband Internet access, and is free from discrimination.
  2. People Objectives: People that live in the neighborhood, with a primary focus on residents of the housing targeted for revitalization, benefit from:
    • Effective Education. A high level of resident access to: high quality early learning programs and services so children enter kindergarten ready to learn; and quality schools and/or educational supports that ultimately prepare students to graduate from high school college- and career-ready.
    • Employment Opportunities. The income of neighborhood residents and residents of the target housing development, particularly wage income for non-elderly/non-disabled adult residents, increases over time.
    • Quality Health Care. Health for residents over time is as good as or better than that of other households with similar economic and demographic conditions.
    • Housing Location, Quality, and Affordability. Residents who, by their own choice, do not return to the development have housing and neighborhood opportunities as good as or better than the opportunities available to those who occupy the redeveloped site.
  3. Neighborhood Objectives: Through investments catalyzed with Choice Neighborhoods, the neighborhood enjoys improved:
    • Private and Public Investment in the Neighborhood. The neighboring housing has a very low vacancy/abandonment rate, the housing inventory is of high quality, and the neighborhood is mixed income and maintains a mixture of incomes over time.
    • Amenities. The distance traveled from the neighborhood to basic services is equal to or less than the distance traveled from the median neighborhood in the metropolitan area. Those basic services include grocery stores, banks, health clinics and doctors’ offices, dentist offices, and high quality early learning programs and services.
    • Effective Public Schools: Public schools in the target neighborhood are safe and welcoming places for children and their families. In addition, schools have test scores that are as good as or better than the state average or are implementing school reforms that raise student achievement over time and graduate students from high school prepared for college and a career.
    • Safety: Residents are living in a safer environment as evidenced by the revitalized neighborhood having dramatically lower crime rates than the neighborhood had prior to redevelopment and maintaining a lower crime rate over time.
LINK to RFP: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html, FR-6100-N-38

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Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
Service Area Competition HRSA-18-025


DEADLINE: Application Due Date in Grants.gov: October 10, 2017.
Supplemental Information Due Date in HRSA EHB: October 25, 2017.

AWARD: Anticipated total annual funding of approximately $244 million for up to three years. Individual awards vary. Please see the SAAT table for more information: https://bphc.hrsa.gov/sac/.

NUMBER OF AWARDS:Up to 59 grants.

ELIGIBILITY: Public or nonprofit private entities, including tribal, faith-based, or community-based organizations.

TARGET POPULATION: Underserved communities and vulnerable populations.

SUMMARY: The Health Center Program supports public and private nonprofit community-based and patient-directed organizations that provide primary health care services to the Nation’s medically underserved. The purpose of the SAC NOFO is to ensure continued access to affordable, quality primary health care services for communities and vulnerable populations currently served by the Health Center Program.

Your application must document an understanding of the need for primary health care services in the service area and propose a comprehensive plan to meet this need. The plan must ensure the availability and accessibility of primary health care services to all individuals in the service area and target population, regardless of ability to pay. You must further demonstrate that your plan includes collaborative and coordinated delivery systems for the provision of health care to the underserved. Your application must demonstrate compliance with applicable Health Center Program requirements and corresponding regulations and policies.

In addition to the Health Center Program requirements, specific requirements for applicants requesting funding under each health center type are outlined below.

Community Health Center (CHC) Applicants:

  • Provide a plan that ensures the availability and accessibility of required primary and preventive health care services to underserved populations in the service area.
Migrant Health Center (MHC) Applicants:
  • Provide a plan that ensures the availability and accessibility of required primary and preventive health care services to migratory and seasonal agricultural workers and their families in the service area.
    • Migratory agricultural workers are individuals principally employed in agriculture and who establish temporary housing for the purpose of this work, including those individuals who have had such work as their principal employment within 24 months as well as their dependent family members. Agricultural workers who leave a community to work elsewhere are classified as migratory workers in both communities. Aged and disabled former agricultural workers should also be included in this group.
    • Seasonal agricultural workers are individuals employed in agriculture on a seasonal basis who do not establish a temporary home for purposes of employment, including their family members.
Health Care for the Homeless (HCH) Applicants:
  • Provide a plan that ensures the availability and accessibility of required primary and preventive health care services to people experiencing homelessness, defined as patients who lack housing, including residents of permanent supportive housing, transitional housing, or other housing programs that are targeted to homeless populations, in the service area. This plan may also allow for the continuation of services for up to 12 months to individuals no longer homeless as a result of becoming a resident of permanent housing.
  • Provide substance abuse services.
Public Housing Primary Care Applicants:
  • Provide a plan that ensures the availability and accessibility of required primary and preventive health care services to residents of public housing and individuals living in areas immediately accessible to public housing. Public housing means public housing agency-developed, owned, or assisted low-income housing, including mixed finance projects. It does not mean public housing that is only subsidized through Section 8 housing vouchers.
  • Consult with residents of the proposed public housing sites regarding the planning and administration of the program.
LINK to RFP: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html, FOA#: HRSA-18-025

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Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
State Systems Development Initiative (SSDI) Grant Program – Tier 1 (Jurisdictions)
State Systems Development Initiative (SSDI) Grant Program – Tier 2 (States and DC)


DEADLINE: Applications due: September 5, 2017.

AWARD: Total anticipated annual funding of $5,500,000 with a total of $400,000 available for HRSA-18-061: Tier 1 and $5,100,000 available for HRSA-18-062: Tier 2 for five years. Tier 1 individual amounts are up to $50,000 per year and Tier 2 individual amounts are up to $5,100,000 per year.

NUMBER OF AWARDS:59 total awards with 8 Tier 1 awards and 51 Tier 2 awards.

ELIGIBILITY: Funding eligibility is limited to the 59 state and jurisdictional Title V MCH Block Grant awardees.

  • HRSA-18-061, Tier 1, includes the eight (8) jurisdictional Title V agencies of American Samoa, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Guam, Marshall Islands, Puerto Rico, Palau, and the U.S. Virgin Islands; and
  • HRSA-18-062, Tier 2, includes the 50 states and Washington, DC.
TARGET POPULATION: State and jurisdictional Title V Maternal and Child Health (MCH) programs for women, infants, children and youth, including children and youth with special health care needs.

SUMMARY: The primary purpose of SSDI is to develop, enhance, and expand state and jurisdictional Title V Maternal and Child Health (MCH) data capacity for its needs assess assessment and performance measure reporting in the Title V MCH Block Grant program.

HRSA-18-061: Tier 1 applications for SSDI grant funding must address the following two goals:
  1. Build and expand jurisdiction MCH data capacity to support the Title V MCH Block Grant program activities and contribute to data-driven decision making in MCH programs, including assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation; and
  2. Provide partnership and on-site support for the development and implementation of a data collection tool/process that will enable tracking of Title V MCH Block Grant NPM data.
Tier 1 activities can include but are not limited to:
  • Supporting Title V MCH Block Grant program data needs associated with your Title V MCH Block Grant 5-year Needs Assessment process, including selection of the state’s priorities, as well as ongoing interim needs assessment activities;
  • Assisting Title V MCH Block Grant programs with development, selection, refinement, and tracking of data and performance measures that are associated with the Title V MCH Block Grant performance measure framework, including NOMs, NPMs, State Performance Measures (SPMs), and ESMs;
  • Supporting data needs associated with annual preparation of the Title V MCH Block Grant application/annual report; and
  • Collaborating and providing on-site support for an MCHB-initiated effort to develop and implement a data collection tool/process that will assist jurisdictional Title V MCH Block Grant programs in reporting and tracking data needed for the Title V MCH Block Grant NPMs.
HRSA-18-062: Tier 2 applications for SSDI grant funding must address the following three goals (two general and one state-specific):
  1. (General) Build and expand state MCH data capacity to support the Title V MCH Block Grant program activities and contribute to data-driven decision making in MCH programs, including assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation;
  2. (General) Advance the development and utilization of linked information systems between key MCH datasets in the state; and
  3. (State-specific) Select one of the following special projects for programmatic focus over the 5-year funding period:
    1. Support program evaluation activities around the NPMs that contribute to building the evidence base for the Title V MCH Block Grant;
    2. Provide data support to states participating in quality improvement activities (e.g., Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Networks); or
    3. Support surveillance systems development to address data needs related to emerging MCH issues (e.g., the Zika virus, neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), or lead poisoning prevention).
Tier 2 activities, associated with the first two general goals, can include but are not limited to:
  • Supporting Title V MCH Block Grant program data needs associated with your Title V MCH Block Grant 5-year Needs Assessment process, including selection of the state’s priorities, as well as ongoing interim needs assessment activities;
  • Assisting Title V MCH Block Grant programs with development, selection, refinement, and tracking of data and performance measures that are associated with the Title V MCH Block Grant performance measure framework, including NOMs, NPMs, SPMs, and ESMs;
  • Supporting data needs associated with annual preparation of the Title V MCH Block Grant application/annual report; and
  • Developing and implementing a plan for overcoming barriers to data linkage across the 5-year funding cycle, particularly focusing on indicators from the Minimum/Core (M/C) Dataset for Title V MCH Block Grant programs.
Tier 2 activities associated with the third state-specific goal are based upon the area selected for targeted emphasis. Activities identified will be unique to each SSDI grantee.

LINK to RFP: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html, FOA #: HRSA-18-061, HRSA-18-062.

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Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
Substance Abuse Treatment Telehealth Network Grant Program


DEADLINE: Applications due: August 23, 2017.

AWARD: Up to $250,000 per year for three years.

NUMBER OF AWARDS:Up to three (3) grants.

ELIGIBILITY: Eligible applicants include rural or urban public and private nonprofit entities that provide services through a telehealth network. Each entity participating in the applicant’s network may be a nonprofit or for-profit entity. Faith-based, community-based, tribes, and tribal organizations are eligible to apply. Services must be provided to rural areas, although the applicant can be located in an urban area.

Current and former OAT Telehealth Network Grant recipients are eligible to apply for funds through this notice but must propose a project that differs in sites/services/concept from the previously funded project.

TARGET POPULATION: Rural, frontier, and underserved communities.

SUMMARY: The purpose of this program is to demonstrate how telehealth programs and networks can improve access to health care services, particularly substance abuse treatment services, in rural, frontier, and underserved communities. Telehealth Network Grant Program (TNGP) networks are used to:

  1. expand access to, coordinate, and improve the quality of health care services;
  2. improve and expand the training of health care providers; and/or
  3. expand and improve the quality of health information available to health care providers, and patients and their families, for decision-making.
In particular, we encourage applications from telehealth networks that provide services through small rural hospitals that serve patients in counties with high rates of poverty and unemployment.

Telehealth is a promising tool for providing substance abuse treatment services and support to rural populations. Communities that lack sufficient substance abuse treatment and other behavioral health professionals can utilize telehealth technologies to increase access to care. The use of telehealth allows existing providers to cover a wider geographic region. In turn, patients are able to access care locally rather than traveling long distances to receive care, or worse, forgoing care because of the inconvenience or lack of adequate transportation resources.

The primary purpose of the SAT-TNGP is to support tele-substance abuse treatment and other behavioral health care services with a secondary focus on providing services to address common chronic disease conditions (e.g., congestive heart failure, cancer, stroke, chronic respiratory disease and/or diabetes). Including a secondary focus will allow successful award recipients to use telehealth technologies to address a broader range of comorbid health care needs and ensure that they are optimizing the telehealth investment in addition to meeting the primary goal of providing substance abuse treatment and other behavioral health services. Further, research indicates that people with addiction often have unaddressed or inadequately addressed chronic medical conditions. HRSA is particularly interested in applications that will make broad use of the technology to expand services locally with the primary focus on substance abuse treatment but also the secondary areas in recognition that the capacity to provide telehealth services in each site can be used to meet other local service needs. Increased volume of telehealth services can also drive down per-unit costs and expand the number of insurer-covered services to help make the network sustainable beyond the federal funding period.

Successful applicants will also be required to submit performance data (including clinical data) on a range of metrics that we will identify after the awards are made. These data are integral to meeting the broad program purpose of demonstrating how telehealth programs and networks can improve access to health care services in rural and underserved communities.

Important: Applicants should have a successful track record in implementing telehealth technology and have a network of partners in place and committed to the project as of the date of application. Applicants failing to submit verifiable information with respect to the commitment of network partners, including specific roles, responsibilities, and clinical services to be provided, will not be funded. TNGP funds are intended to fund network expansion and/or to increase the breadth of services of successful telehealth networks.

LINK to RFP: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html, FOA#: HRSA-17-122

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Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
Service Area Competition HRSA-18-021


DEADLINE: Application Due Date in Grants.gov: August 21, 2017.
Supplemental Information Due Date in HRSA EHB: September 6, 2017.

AWARD: Anticipated total annual funding of approximately $337.1 million for up to three years. Individual awards vary. Please see the SAAT table for more information: https://bphc.hrsa.gov/sac/.

NUMBER OF AWARDS:Up to 73 grants.

ELIGIBILITY: Public or nonprofit private entities, including tribal, faith-based, or community-based organizations.

TARGET POPULATION: Underserved communities and vulnerable populations.

SUMMARY: The Health Center Program supports public and private nonprofit community-based and patient-directed organizations that provide primary health care services to the Nation’s medically underserved. The purpose of the SAC NOFO is to ensure continued access to affordable, quality primary health care services for communities and vulnerable populations currently served by the Health Center Program.

Your application must document an understanding of the need for primary health care services in the service area and propose a comprehensive plan to meet this need. The plan must ensure the availability and accessibility of primary health care services to all individuals in the service area and target population, regardless of ability to pay. You must further demonstrate that your plan includes collaborative and coordinated delivery systems for the provision of health care to the underserved. Your application must demonstrate compliance with applicable Health Center Program requirements and corresponding regulations and policies.

In addition to the Health Center Program requirements, specific requirements for applicants requesting funding under each health center type are outlined below.

Community Health Center (CHC) Applicants:

  • Provide a plan that ensures the availability and accessibility of required primary and preventive health care services to underserved populations in the service area.
Migrant Health Center (MHC) Applicants:
  • Provide a plan that ensures the availability and accessibility of required primary and preventive health care services to migratory and seasonal agricultural workers and their families in the service area.
    • Migratory agricultural workers are individuals principally employed in agriculture and who establish temporary housing for the purpose of this work, including those individuals who have had such work as their principal employment within 24 months as well as their dependent family members. Agricultural workers who leave a community to work elsewhere are classified as migratory workers in both communities. Aged and disabled former agricultural workers should also be included in this group.
    • Seasonal agricultural workers are individuals employed in agriculture on a seasonal basis who do not establish a temporary home for purposes of employment, including their family members.
Health Care for the Homeless (HCH) Applicants:
  • Provide a plan that ensures the availability and accessibility of required primary and preventive health care services to people experiencing homelessness, defined as patients who lack housing, including residents of permanent supportive housing, transitional housing, or other housing programs that are targeted to homeless populations, in the service area. This plan may also allow for the continuation of services for up to 12 months to individuals no longer homeless as a result of becoming a resident of permanent housing.
  • Provide substance abuse services.
Public Housing Primary Care Applicants:
  • Provide a plan that ensures the availability and accessibility of required primary and preventive health care services to residents of public housing and individuals living in areas immediately accessible to public housing. Public housing means public housing agency-developed, owned, or assisted low-income housing, including mixed finance projects. It does not mean public housing that is only subsidized through Section 8 housing vouchers.
  • Consult with residents of the proposed public housing sites regarding the planning and administration of the program.
LINK to RFP: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html, FOA#: HRSA-18-021

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Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)
Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Part C HIV Early Intervention Services Program: Existing Geographic Service Areas


DEADLINE: Applications due: August 14, 2017.

AWARD: Approximately $183,586,879 is expected to be available annually to fund 344 recipients across three (3) different periods of performance start dates:

  • HRSA-18-001 – $65,393,962 per year for three years starting January 1, 2018.
  • HRSA-18-004 – $49,795,407 per year for three years starting April 1, 2018.
  • HRSA-18-005 – $68,397,510 per year for three years starting May 1, 2018.
NUMBER OF AWARDS: Three different numbers of awards with 344 recipients total:
  • HRSA-18-001: 91 grants
  • HRSA-18-004: 114 grants
  • HRSA-18-005: 139 grants
ELIGIBILITY: Public and nonprofit private entities that are:
  1. Federally-qualified health centers;
  2. Grantees under section 1001 (regarding family planning) other than States;
  3. Comprehensive hemophilia diagnostic and treatment centers;
  4. Rural health clinics;
  5. Health facilities operated by or pursuant to a contract with the Indian Health Service;
  6. Community-based organizations, clinics, hospitals and other health facilities that provide early intervention services to those persons infected with HIV/AIDS through intravenous drug use; or
  7. Nonprofit private entities that provide comprehensive primary care services to populations at risk of HIV/AIDS, including faith-based and community-based organizations.
This competition is open to current recipients and new organizations proposing to provide RWHAP Part C EIS funded services in the geographic service areas in Appendix B of the RFA.

TARGET POPULATION: Low-income, uninsured, and underinsured PLWH. The application must address the entire service area, as defined in Appendix B of the RFA. Applicants applying for more than one service area listed in Appendix B must submit a separate application for each service area under the correct funding opportunity number.

SUMMARY: The purpose of fiscal year (FY) 2018 Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program (RWHAP) Part C HIV Early Intervention Services Program: Existing Geographic Service Areas is to provide comprehensive primary health care and support services in an outpatient setting for low income, uninsured, and underinsured people living with HIV (PLWH). Under this announcement, applicants must propose to provide:
  1. targeted HIV counseling and testing;
  2. medical evaluation and clinical and diagnostic services;
  3. therapeutic measures for preventing and treating the deterioration of the immune system, and for preventing and treating conditions arising from HIV/AIDS; and
  4. referrals to appropriate providers of health care and support services.
RWHAP Part C EIS recipients must provide comprehensive primary health care and support services throughout the entire designated geographic service areas (referred to as “service areas” throughout this NOFO) listed in Appendix B with the goals of providing optimal HIV care and treatment for low-income, uninsured, and underinsured PLWH and improving health outcomes.

All allowable services must relate to HIV diagnosis, care and support, and must adhere to established HIV clinical practice standards consistent with U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Guidelines. Please refer to the HIV/AIDS Bureau (HAB) Policy Clarification Notice (PCN) 16-02 Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program Services: Eligible Individuals and Allowable Uses of Funds for a list of RWHAP allowable core medical and support services and their descriptions. According to the RWHAP Part C legislation:
  • At least 50 percent of the total grant funds must be spent on EIS (except counseling);
  • At least 75 percent of the award (minus amounts for administrative costs, planning/evaluation, and clinical quality management (CQM)) must be used to provide core medical services (Please note: EIS is a subset of this 75% of the award); and
  • Not more than 10 percent of the total RWHAP Part C grant funds can be spent on administrative costs.
Please note that there are three (3) funding announcement numbers included in this document with three (3) different periods of performance start dates. Applicants must apply to the funding opportunity announcement number that corresponds to the start date for their project.

RWHAP Part C EIS Program Requirements and Expectations

Clinical Requirements:
  • HIV Counseling, Testing and Referral – RWHAP Part C funds can be used to provide HIV Counseling, Testing, and Referral (CTR) services to high risk targeted populations in the designated service area in order to identify PLWH and link them into medical care. However, recipients must coordinate these services with other HIV prevention and testing programs to avoid duplication of effort. Linkages and formal referral mechanisms should be established to ensure follow-up care and treatment for those persons identified as HIV-positive.
  • Medical Care Evaluation and Clinical Care – RWHAP Part C recipients must provide comprehensive patient–centered primary health care services in an outpatient setting for low-income PLWH throughout their entire designated service area. Recipients must also be able to diagnose, provide prophylaxis, and treat or refer clients co-infected with tuberculosis, Hepatitis B and C, and sexually transmitted infections. Program-wide clinical protocols should be in place to address these co-morbidities.
  • Referral Systems - A process must be in place for referring patients to needed health care and support services such as oral health, specialty care, medical case management, etc.
  • Linkage to Clinical Trials – A plan must be in place for referring appropriate patients to biomedical research facilities or community-based organizations that conduct HIV-related clinical trials.
  • Clinical Quality Management – A CQM program must be implemented to: (1) assess the extent to which HIV health services provided to patients under the grant are consistent with HHS Guidelines for the treatment of HIV/AIDS and related opportunistic infections, (2) develop strategies for ensuring that such services are consistent with the guidelines for improvement in the access to quality HIV health services, and (3) ensure that improvements in the access and quality of HIV health services are addressed.
  • Coordination/Linkages to Other Programs – Coordination must occur with all available and accessible community resources, such as federally-funded and non-federally-funded programs (e.g., substance abuse treatment, mental health treatment, homelessness, housing, other support service programs). This may also include other publicly funded entities providing primary care services, such as Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) and behavioral health treatment service organizations, including those funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Recipients are also expected to collaborate with entities that provide ongoing HIV prevention activities and establish formal linkages with them for referral of HIV-positive individuals into care and treatment services at your site.
  • Medicaid Provider Status – All providers of services available under the state Medicaid plan must have entered into a participation agreement under the state plan and be qualified to receive payments under such plan, or receive a waiver from this requirement.
  • Clinic Licensure – Primary medical care providers and case management agencies must be fully licensed to provide clinical and case management services, as required by their state and/or local jurisdiction.
LINK to RFP: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html, FOA#: HRSA-18-001, HRSA-18-004, HRSA-18-005

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National Institute of Corrections (NIC)
Networking and Professional Development of State and Large Urban System Healthcare Administrators


DEADLINE: Applications due: September 7, 2017.

AWARD: Up to $150,000 for a 12-month project period.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: One award.

ELIGIBILITY: NIC invites applications from nonprofit organizations (including faith-based, community, and tribal organizations), for-profit organizations (including tribal for-profit organizations), and institutions of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education). Recipients, including for-profit organizations, must agree to waive any profit or fee for services.

NIC welcomes applications that involve two or more entities; however, one eligible entity must be the applicant and the others must be proposed as sub-recipients. The applicant must be the entity with primary responsibility for administering the funding and managing the entire program.

TARGET POPULATION: Administrators of healthcare systems in corrections.

SUMMARY: The field of corrections and healthcare services for corrections is constantly evolving, requiring continuous learning and professional development for healthcare administrators. It is imperative for Healthcare Administrators to stay current regarding critical issues facing the field and methods for effectively addressing areas of need. It is critically important for them to keep abreast of correctional best practices and emerging issues, as well as developing and maintaining a strong peer network of other correctional healthcare administrators. Further, other Healthcare Administrators of Corrections provide vital assistance in gathering information, sharing perspectives, and providing possible solutions to their peers.

Programs tailored specifically to the professional development needs of the healthcare administrator have been both presented and supported annually for many years. Addressing emerging issues and persistent challenges in healthcare both behavioral and mental problems is essential for all Administrators of Healthcare Systems in Corrections, regardless of how long they have served in their positions. Providing training in the proper format supports development of effective healthcare services, leadership and learning. Given NIC’s role of serving as a center of learning, innovation and leadership that shapes and advances effective correctional practice and public policy, NIC is a vital partner in planning and conducting of these training programs for all eligible Healthcare Administrators for Corrections.

At the end of this Cooperative Agreement, a curriculum should be developed using NIC’s Instructional Theory Into Practice (ITIP) model. The curriculum should include a facilitator’s manual, participant’s manual, and all relevant supplemental material (such as PowerPoint slides, visual &/or audio aids, handouts, exercises, etc.). The use of blended learning tools such as a live web-based training environment (e.g. WebEx) or supplemental on-line training courses is encouraged. Clear learning objectives should be contained in each lesson, and delivery modality should be based on how to most efficiently and effectively achieve these objectives. The curriculum shall be presented and changes incorporated as necessary. Consideration should be given to advance work for participants, such as reading assignments or taking an online course through NIC’s Learn Center. An evaluation, to be distributed at the beginning and conclusion of the training has been developed. This evaluation protocol will examine the content, processes, and delivery of the program; the evaluation has been designed with the purpose in mind of helping to revise and improve the training and curricula.

The goals of these professional development training programs are to develop and enhance competency based leadership skills as well as enhance healthcare knowledge for state and large urban system Healthcare Administrators of Corrections, focusing on collaborative and sustainable approaches to organizational management.

The successful applicant(s) must: (1) articulate a clear understanding of the unique training needs of Correctional Healthcare Administrators, (2) have effectively incorporated adult learning principles into training modules, (3) have coordinated and facilitated training at the executive and senior level, and (4) identify several committed project team members who have served at a senior/executive level in a state or large urban correctional agency as a healthcare administrator.

The program’s overall objectives include the following:

  • Provide newly appointed or selected state and large urban correctional healthcare administrators to their new leadership role and the multiple complexities inherent in correctional healthcare that accompany changes of command;
  • Provide a safe and confidential training environment where correctional healthcare leaders may candidly discuss challenges and experiences involving their organization, both internal and external; and
  • Provide an opportunity for participants to share information, engage in networking and mentoring relationships as well thoughtfully review emerging healthcare issues and trends that are impacting the field of corrections.
RFP available at: https://s3.amazonaws.com/static.nicic.gov/UserShared/2017-08-07_17pa02_healthcare_administrators_solicitation_2017-1.pdf

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National Institute of Corrections (NIC)
Transition From Jails to Community (TJC) – Technical Assistance


DEADLINE: Applications due: August 31, 2017.

AWARD: Up to $ 199,000 for a 12-month project period.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: One award.

ELIGIBILITY: NIC invites applications from nonprofit organizations (including faith-based, community, and tribal organizations), for-profit organizations (including tribal for-profit organizations), and institutions of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education). Recipients, including for-profit organizations, must agree to waive any profit or fee for services.

NIC welcomes applications that involve two or more entities; however, one eligible entity must be the applicant and the others must be proposed as sub-recipients. The applicant must be the entity with primary responsibility for administering the funding and managing the entire program.

TARGET POPULATION: Justice-involved adults transitioning back to the community.

SUMMARY: In 2007, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) launched the Transition from Jails to Community (TJC) Initiative to support the local reentry efforts of justice-involved adults. Under the Initiative, targeted technical assistance was provided to fourteen learning sites (including two jurisdictions selected in response to California Assembly Bill 109). Historically, community reintegration has proven complicated related to the brief length of stays in jails, the complex needs of justice-involved adults, and the lack of community-based coordination for supervision and/or post release treatment. These reintegration issues are more pronounced when considering the approximate 12 million adults transitioning through our nation’s 3000+ local and community jails annually. The need exists for implementation of national strategy to increase public safety while enhancing evidence based programming to support the reintegration efforts of the men and women transitioning back into our nation’s communities.

A proposal responsive to this solicitation should provide evidence of ten (10) years of experience in the following areas: delivery of technical assistance to various local and State organizations, and evaluation of organizational culture specific to leadership, collaborative structure and data collection capacity. In addition, the applicant should provide evidence of expert knowledge regarding public safety, reentry services, evidence based practices, screening and assessments, transition planning, program evaluation, case management and training.

Tasks under this cooperative agreement will include; review of the TJC toolkit and historical documents, utilization of the TJC readiness protocol and evaluation instrument to evaluate organizational progress, delivery of targeted technical assistance to a minimum of eight (8) jurisdictions, development/facilitation of a training/coaching protocol for technical assistant providers, and development and facilitation of a ninety (90) minute workshop regarding the implementation and sustainability of the TJC process for a national audience. In addition, the contractor will work with designated NIC staff to ensure compliance with federal guidelines specific to the Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA).

Deliverables. In addition to the strategy and content of the program design, the successful applicant must complete the following deliverables during the project period. The program narrative should reflect how the applicant will accomplish these activities:

  • Review of all documents directly related to NIC’s TJC toolkit
  • Participate in planning meetings with NIC Project Manager to support site selections
  • Prepare an Information Collection Request (ICR), which describes the information to be collected, gives the reason the information is needed, and estimates the time and cost for the public to answer the request
  • Collaborate with NIC Project Manager to select technical assistance providers
  • Develop a written report regarding TJC process for dissemination to the criminal justice field
  • Submission of eight quarterly reports reflecting the progress of the project
  • Develop/facilitate monthly coaching sessions for technical assistance providers
  • Develop 90 minute TJC workshop for a facilitation during national conferences
  • Conduct visits of at least (10) sites to evaluate jurisdictional readiness and progress specific to the TJC model
RFP available at: https://www.grants.gov/web/grants/search-grants.html, grants.gov #: 17CS10

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New York City Department of Youth and Community Development (DYCD)
Runaway and Homeless Youth Services (Open-Ended)


DEADLINE: Open-Ended.

AWARD: Available in RFP. Number of awards not mentioned in concept paper.

ELIGIBILITY: To receive this RFP in the HHS Accelerator system, you must have an approved Service Application for at least one of the following:

  • Preventive Services
  • Case Management
  • Shelter
  • Drop-in Center
  • Homelessness Prevention
  • Housing
TARGET POPULATION: Runaway and homeless youth and their families in New York City.

SUMMARY: The New York City Department of Youth and Community Development (DYCD) invests in a network of community based organizations and programs to alleviate the effects of poverty and provide opportunities for New Yorkers and communities to flourish.

DYCD funds a range of services for Runaway and Homeless Youth that includes Drop-in Centers, Crisis Shelters, Transitional Independent Living programs, and Street Outreach and Referral Services.

DYCD’s Runaway and Homeless Youth services are designed to protect runaway and homeless youth and reunite them with their families whenever possible.

In accordance with their mission to support the City’s youth and their families by funding high quality youth and community development programs, DYCD is seeking additional beds to be operated by qualified nonprofits organizations to provide residential beds within Crisis shelters or transitional independent living facilities.

LINK to RFP: http://www1.nyc.gov/assets/hhsaccelerator/downloads/pdf/DYCDRunawayandHomelessYouthServices.pdf, RFP available to eligible applicants in HHS Accelerator

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New York City Human Resources Administration (HRA)
NY/NY III Non-Emergency Permanent Supportive Congregate Housing for Chronically Homeless Single Adults Living with AIDS or Advanced HIV Illness


DEADLINE: This is an open-ended RFP; therefore, all proposals will be accepted and reviewed on an ongoing basis until all units covered by this RFP are sited.

AWARD: HRA has determined that the maximum cost per unit will be $25,444 per year. However, HRA reserves the right to develop contracts with a lower unit cost. Contractors should seek and secure the use of non-HRA funding and in kind contributions in their overall operating budget when applicable, to maximize economies of scale. Such funding would provide an offset to the negotiated annual budget amount.

NUMBER OF AWARDS: 145 units remaining

ELIGIBILITY: Permanent non-emergency facilities would accept all referrals forwarded for each vacant unit unless the program can demonstrate to HASA that the client is not suitable for the program.

TARGET POPULATION: Chronically homeless single adults living with HIV/AIDS or advanced HIV illness.

SUMMARY: HRA is seeking appropriately qualified vendors to operate and maintain approximately 145 units remaining of permanent supportive congregate housing for chronically homeless single adults who are living with HIV/AIDS and who suffer from a co-occurring serious and persistent mental illness, a substance abuse disorder, or a Mentally Ill Chemical Abuse (MICAS) disorder.

Under these programs the proposer is expected to provide case management and support services to clients to enable all eligible clients to achieve the skills and financial independence required for independent living. In addition, the proposer is required to maximize the client’s self-reliance and capacity for independence through referrals to employment programs for training, vocational rehabilitation and job placement. The proposer is expected to work with the target population to maximize functional capacity, reduce morbidity and mortality by linking clients to health, mental health and/or substance abuse treatment services and monitoring treatment adherence/compliance.

This is an Open-Ended RFP; therefore, proposals will be accepted and reviewed on an ongoing basis until all units covered by this RFP are sited.

RFP available at: http://www1.nyc.gov/site/hra/business/request-for-proposals.page, (see Request for Proposals for Provision of Non-Emergency Permanent Supportive Congregate Housing for Chronically Homeless Single Adults Living with AIDS or Advanced HIV Illness under the NY/NY III Supportive Housing Agreement (Opened Ended).

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Office for Victims of Crime (OVC)
Vision 21 Integrated Services for Victims Program: Increasing Access to Mental Health Services for Victims of Crime


DEADLINE: Applications due: August 10, 2017.

AWARD: There are multiple Purpose Areas with different awards under this solicitation:

Purpose Area 1: Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Training for Crime Victim Advocates
OVC expects to make up one award of up to $500,000 under this purpose area. OVC expects to make the award for a 36-month period of performance, to begin on October 1, 2017.

Purpose Area 2A – Direct Services: Increasing Access to Victim Services for Victims of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Who Have an SMI
OVC expects to make up to three awards of up to $350,000 each, for a total of up to $1,050,000 under this purpose area. OVC expects to make the awards for a 36-month period of performance, to begin on October 1, 2017.

Purpose Area 2B – Training and Technical Assistance: Increasing Access to Victim Services for Victims of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Who Have an SMI
OVC expects to make one award of up to $400,000 under this purpose area. OVC expects to make the award for a 36-month period of performance, to begin on October 1, 2017.

Purpose Area 3A – Direct Services: Increasing Access to Mental Health Services to Traditionally Underserved Victims of Crime
OVC expects to make up to three awards of up to $450,000, for a total of up to $1,350,000 under this purpose area. OVC expects to make the awards for a 36-month period of performance, to begin on October 1, 2017.

Purpose Area 3B – Training and Technical Assistance: Increasing Access to Mental Health Services to Traditionally Underserved Victims of Crime
OVC expects to make one award of up to $450,000 under this purpose area. OVC expects to make the award for a 36-month period of performance, to begin on October 1, 2017.

ELIGIBILITY: There are multiple Purpose Areas with different eligibility under this solicitation:

Purpose Area 1: Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Training for Crime Victim Advocates
Eligible applicants for this purpose area are limited to: nonprofit and for-profit organizations (including tribal nonprofit and for-profit organizations; and institutions of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education). For-profit organizations (like other recipients) must forgo any profit or management fee. The successful applicant would be required to report any profits generated from the project as program income, and would also be required to reinvest any program income into the project. Applicants to this purpose area must have demonstrated experience and understanding of suicide and suicidality, including experience developing and implementing suicide prevention activities, implementing suicide screening and assessment activities, and providing training to lay persons and professionals on screening, assessment, and intervention.

Purpose Area 2A- Direct Services: Increasing Access to Victim Services for Victims of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Who Have an SMI
Eligible applicants for this purpose area are limited to: (a) mental health services programs operated by state, local, or by federally recognized Indian tribal governments (as determined by the Secretary of the Interior); and (b) nonprofit organizations (including tribal nonprofit organizations) whose primary mission is to provide direct services to victims of domestic violence and sexual assault.

Applications developed in response to this purpose area must be developed through a collaborative partnership that includes both (a) and (b), and the application must be supported by an MOU signed by both partners as detailed on page 26. OVC will designate any applicant who fails to demonstrate that its application for funding was developed collaboratively, and/or who fails to submit the required MOU as ineligible for funding consideration.

Purpose Area 2B – Training and Technical Assistance: Increasing Access to Victim Services for Victims of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Who Have an SMI
Eligible applicants for this purpose area include institutions of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education) and nonprofit organizations (including tribal nonprofit organizations). Applicants for this purpose area must demonstrate: an expert-level understanding of the etiology and treatment of SMI; experience in developing programs or strategies to increase access to mental health services for individuals with SMI; subject matter expertise in issues related to domestic violence and sexual assault; prior experience in providing TTA on these topics to mental health professionals and victim advocates.

Purpose Area 3A – Direct Services: Increasing Access to Mental Health Services to Traditionally Underserved Victims of Crime
Eligible applicants for this purpose area include: (a) mental health services programs operated by state, local, or by federally recognized Indian tribal governments (as determined by the Secretary of the Interior); and (b) nonprofit organizations (including tribal nonprofit organizations) whose primary mission is to provide services to victims of crime.

Applications developed in response to this purpose area must be developed through a collaborative partnership that includes both (a) and (b), and the application must be supported by an MOU signed by both partners as detailed on page 26. If neither (a) nor (b) has demonstrated expertise in providing culturally competent services to the target population that would be served in the application, then the collaborative partnership must be expanded to include a nonprofit and/or community-based organization whose primary mission is to meet the specific health, safety, or general welfare needs of the underserved population that would be the recipient of the proposed services. OVC will designate any applicant who fails to demonstrate that its application for funding was developed collaboratively, and/or who fails to submit the required MOU as ineligible for funding consideration.

Purpose Area 3B – Training and Technical Assistance: Increasing Access to Mental Health Services to Traditionally Underserved Victims of Crime
Eligible applicants for this purpose area include institutions of higher education (including tribal institutions of higher education) and nonprofit organizations (including tribal nonprofit organizations). Applicants for this purpose area must demonstrate: subject matter expertise in understanding and treating the mental health needs of victims of crime; expertise in providing training on how to provide culturally competent services to members of multicultural populations; experience in using technology and other media to help communities develop innovative solutions to providing mental health services; and an expert level of understanding of the mental and emotional needs of victims of crime.

Eligible applicants may apply to only one purpose area in this solicitation. OVC will not consider applicants that apply for more than one purpose area.

TARGET POPULATION: Traditionally underserved victims of crime, victim services providers, and mental health services providers.

Traditionally underserved victims of crime include:

  • Victims of crime at risk for suicide,
  • Victims of domestic violence and sexual assault who have a Serious Mental Illness (SMI), For purposes of this program, an individual who has an SMI includes anyone: (i) age 18 or older, (ii) who is currently experiencing/or has experienced in the past 12 months, (iii) a diagnosable mental, behavioral, or emotional disorder that has lasted long enough to meet the diagnostic criteria in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, and (iv) the disorder “…substantially interferes with or limits one or more major life activities,”
  • Crime victims from traditionally underserved communities. For purposes of this program, the term “traditionally underserved” refers to individuals who are members of any of the following populations of victims of crime: deaf and hard-of-hearing; lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT); American Indians/Alaska Natives; older adults; Limited English Proficient (LEP) individuals; and those who reside in rural communities.
SUMMARY: The primary aim of OVC’s FY 2017 Vision 21 Integrated Services for Victims Program: Increasing Access to Mental Health Services for Victims of Crime (Vision 21 ISV Program) is to bridge the divide between crime victims, victim services providers, and mental health services providers so that communities are able to create a seamless network of services to assist crime victims to recover, heal, and thrive. The Vision 21 ISV Program includes three goals that will: (1) help victim services providers to properly identify crime victims who may be exhibiting signs of suicidality, refer them to appropriate mental health services, and support their access to such services; (2) increase the capacity of both victim services providers and mental health service providers to provide mental health services to victims of domestic violence and sexual assault who also have a severe mental illness; and (3) increase access to mental health services for traditionally underserved victims of crime. The five Vision 21 ISV Program purpose areas are described in greater detail below.
  1. Purpose Area 1: Suicide Prevention Gatekeeper Training for Crime Victim Advocates
    A “gatekeeper” is an individual who routinely has personal contact with community members and who, with proper training and education, has the ability to identify community members at risk for suicide and refer them to appropriate services. While many victims of crime may struggle to cope with grief/loss and trauma, some (e.g., adolescents, victims of intimate partner violence, victims of rape/sexual assault) may be more susceptible to depression and intense feelings of hopelessness that place them at higher risk for suicidal ideation, attempts, and completions. Crime victim advocates, including both systems- and community-based advocates, have frequent contact with victims of crime, and may be in the best position to notice symptoms of suicidality among members of this population and refer individuals in crisis to much needed psychiatric care.

    The Vision 21 ISV Program will increase the capacity of crime victim advocates to identify, refer, and support crime victims’ access to emergency/crisis mental health services to help prevent suicide among this vulnerable population by making one, 36- month award to a qualified organization to: (a) develop a specialized gatekeeper training curriculum for crime victim advocates; (b) conduct a series of regional training events to train crime advocates on how to use the curriculum; and (c) provide ongoing post-training technical assistance and support to advocates.

    Goal #1: The award recipient will spend the first 12 months of the award period developing products necessary to provide training. The following objectives support this goal:
    • Develop the gatekeeper training curriculum designed to develop the capacity of crime victim advocates to appropriately identify symptoms of suicidality in crime victims, appropriately intervene, and refer the victims for mental health services;
    • Develop a train-the-trainer curriculum designed to provide workshop participants with the knowledge and skills necessary to deliver the gatekeeper training course themselves;
    • Cooperate with OVC in vetting both curricula with appropriate federal agencies and private organizations as appropriate, and finalizing the curricula so that they comply with OVC’s publication guidelines;
    • Publishing/reproducing electronic and hard copies of both curricula for dissemination.
    Goal #2: Once the curricula have been finalized and approved by OVC, the award recipient will deliver the train-the-trainer curriculum in a series of six regional workshops. The following objectives support this goal:
    • Budget $50,000 of award funds to provide travel scholarship assistance to workshop participants as necessary;
    • Cooperate with OVC in planning the dates and locations of the training workshops;
    • Developing and implementing a plan to market the workshops to the target audience in collaboration with OVC;
    • Manage all logistical aspects of planning and conducting the workshops, including: cooperating with OVC and other relevant DOJ components in obtaining approval for costs associated with planning and conducting the workshops; procuring event space, audio-visual equipment, and support; administering travel scholarships; and managing advance and onsite participant registration.
    Goal #3: The award recipient will provide ongoing guidance and support to participants who have completed the workshop and are delivering the gatekeeper training curriculum. The following objectives support this goal:
    • Devise and implement a strategy to provide post-training coaching and mentoring to participants;
    • Develop a plan to facilitate post-training peer support for workshop participants; and
    • Develop a plan to sustain the project once federal funding is no longer available.
  2. Purpose Area 2: Increasing Access to Victim Services for Victims of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Who Have a Serious Mental Illness (SMI)

    Purpose Area 2A: Funding for Direct Services: While individuals with an SMI are as much as 11 times more likely than people without an SMI to become the victim of a crime, they are highly unlikely to be identified as a victim of crime or receive services due to a number of personal, systemic, and institutional barriers, including: misperceptions/stereotypes about individuals with SMI among service providers; the high likelihood that such victims will have a co-occurring substance abuse disorder; and the untreated symptoms of their SMI.

    Overcoming barriers to access services can be particularly difficult for victims of domestic violence and sexual assault who have an SMI. The prevalence of domestic violence and sexual assault histories among women with SMI, for example, may be as high as 30%; however, these victims are more likely to be referred to a psychiatric facility when they contact traditional domestic violence or sexual assault services programs because their reports are often misinterpreted as being a symptom of their mental illness. Under this purpose area, OVC will award up to three, 36-month cooperative agreements to: (a) aid domestic violence and sexual assault services providers with properly identifying victims who have an SMI, referring them to mental health services treatment, and adapt their operational policies and procedures to ensure that victims with SMI have full and equal access to the services offered by their programs; and (b) assist mental health services providers with revising their intake/assessment procedures to include screening for domestic violence or sexual assault victimization, and referring clients to specialized domestic violence or sexual assault resources. Applicants must demonstrate that the proposed project has been developed through a collaborative partnership between a state, local, tribal, or nonprofit domestic violence or sexual assault services provider program, and a state, local, tribal, or nonprofit mental health services provider program.

    Goal #1: Award recipients who receive funding to support the delivery of direct services under Purpose Area 2 will be required to spend the first 9 months of the 36-month award period devising a plan to deliver services to members of the target population. The following objectives support this goal:
    • Conduct a community needs assessment to identify gaps in services and barriers to accessing services for the target population; and
    • Develop a strategic plan to remedy the systemic problems identified through the assessment, including the adoption of new or revised standard operating procedures and policies, and training for organizational staff members, and the staff of partnering agencies and organizations designed to increase their ability to properly identify and respond to victims of domestic violence or sexual assault who have an SMI.
    Goal #2: Grantees will refer or link victims of domestic violence and sexual assault with an SMI to appropriate services to comprehensively address issues related to their SMI, any co-occurring substance abuse or alcohol abuse disorder, and their violent victimization. All victims served by an award funded under this purpose area must have the opportunity to participate in: individual/group counseling, as appropriate; psychiatric rehabilitation services; case management services; psychiatric care, including psychiatric assessment and medication management services; and drug/alcohol counseling. The following objectives support this goal:
    • Hire qualified, licensed mental health professionals and/or certified substance abuse counselors to deliver individual or group counseling, and/or psychiatric rehabilitation and case management services for members of the target population;
    • Identify additional collaborative partners and referral resources to ensure that the full complement of the victim’s issues can be adequately and appropriately addressed through cross-referrals for services not available through the partnering agencies;
    • Provide training to organizational staff and the staff of partnering agencies and organizations on how to screen for symptoms of SMI, and personal histories of domestic violence or sexual assault during intake and assessment processes; and
    • Develop and implement response protocols that ensure that victims of domestic violence and sexual assault who have an SMI are appropriately identified and linked to necessary services.
    Applicants to Purpose Area 2A must demonstrate that their proposed project was developed as a collaborative partnership between: (1) a state, local, tribal, or mental health services program; and (2) a nonprofit domestic violence or sexual assault services provider program. Applicants must also demonstrate that the required partners will work collaboratively to develop and implement the grant-funded project.

    Purpose Area 2B: Training and Technical Assistance (TTA): As part of the Vision 21 ISV Program, OVC will award a 36-month cooperative agreement to a qualified organization to provide TTA to up to three grantees who would receive funding under Purpose Area 2A. Any proposed strategy for delivering TTA to grant award recipients funded under Purpose Area 2A should include a comprehensive plan to increase the capacity of organizations participating in the funded project to meet the needs of victims of domestic violence or sexual assault who have an SMI.

    Goal: The award recipient under this purpose area will be required to devise a plan to deliver TTA to the grantees who receive funding under Purpose Area 2A. The following objectives support this goal:
    • Work with OVC to plan and conduct a 2-day in-person, grantee orientation meeting including: cooperating with OVC in identifying the location and dates for the meeting; cooperating with OVC and other DOJ components in obtaining approval for the costs associated with conducting the meeting; seeking OVC review and approval of the agenda and all presentation materials; procuring audio-visual equipment and support services; and managing all onsite logistics for the meeting;
    • Cooperate with OVC in devising a plan for ongoing TTA for all grantees through a combination of: periodic webinars and/or conference calls; annual, 2-day in-person meetings in years 2 and 3 of the award period; and annual onsite visits to each of the three grantees;
    • Provide technical guidance to grantees on completing the required community needs assessment and strategic plan;
    • Conduct individual assessment of each grantee’s TTA needs and provide a written report to OVC and the grantee;
    • Develop and implement a customized plan for the delivery of TTA to each grantee through a combination of remote and onsite methods; and
    • Devise a strategy to develop peer-to-peer mentoring and support among grant award recipients.
  3. Purpose Area 3: Increasing Access to Mental Health Services to Traditionally Underserved Victims of Crime
    Purpose Area 3A: Funding for Direct Services: Crime victims from traditionally underserved communities may have difficulty accessing mental health services due to a variety of factors, including: geographic isolation; a lack of local mental health professionals; higher rates of unemployment and poverty; language barriers; and a lack of culturally competent services.

    OVC proposes to increase access to mental health services for crime victims from traditionally underserved populations by awarding up to three, 36-month cooperative agreements to eligible applicants to develop and implement projects that propose to use technology and other innovative practices to reach these populations. Applicants under this purpose area must demonstrate that their proposed project has been developed through a collaborative partnership between: (a) a state, local, tribal, or nonprofit mental health services provider program; (b) a state, local, tribal, or nonprofit crime victim services provider program; and (c) a nonprofit and/or community-based organization whose primary mission is to meet the specific health, safety, or general welfare needs of the underserved population that would be the recipient of the proposed services if neither (a) nor (b) has expertise in meeting the cultural needs of the target population to be served.

    Goal #1: Award recipients who receive funding to support the delivery of direct services under Purpose Area 3 will be required to spend the first 9 months of the 36-month award period devising a plan to deliver services to members of the target population. The following objectives support this goal:
    • Conduct a community needs assessment to identify gaps in services and barriers to accessing services for the target population; and
    • Develop a strategic plan to remedy the systemic problems identified through the assessment, including the adoption of new or revised standard operating procedures and policies, and training for organizational staff members and the staff of partnering agencies and organizations designed to increase their ability to provide culturally competent services to members of the underserved population to be served in the proposed project.
    Goal #2: Grantees under this purpose area must develop and implement creative/innovative projects designed to help crime victims in the underserved population to be served by the proposed project to overcome barriers to accessing mental health services. The following objectives illustrate activities that may be used to support this goal (please note that this list is not comprehensive):
    • Develop a partnership with primary medical care providers to increase screening for crime victimization histories in primary care facilities/settings, and facilitate referrals for appropriate mental health services;
    • Create a community education and outreach campaign designed to increase understanding and awareness of the effect of crime victimization on the mental health and well-being of members of the target population;
    • Support telebehavioral health or distance counseling options to increase access to mental health services for victims of crime in geographically isolated communities, and/or communities with few accessible mental health resources;
    • Provide transportation to crime victims to help support their access to mental health services;
    • Hire qualified, licensed mental health professionals to provide office-based and/or community-based individual counseling to victims of crime; and
    • Increase victim access to psychiatric care, as necessary, including psychiatric evaluation and medication management services.
    Applicants to Purpose Area 3A must demonstrate that their proposed project was developed as a collaborative partnership between: (1) a state, local, tribal, or nonprofit crime victim services program; and (2) a state, local, tribal, or nonprofit mental health services provider program. Additionally, either the lead applicant, or its partner agency, must demonstrate its capacity to provide culturally competent services to the specific population to be served by the proposed project, through its organizational mission statement and/or the expertise and experience of the individuals who would staff the proposed project. If neither the lead applicant nor its partner possesses such expertise, then the collaborative partnership applying for the project should be expanded to include a nonprofit and/or community-based organization whose primary mission is to meet the specific health, safety, or general welfare needs of the underserved population that would be the recipient of the proposed services.

    Purpose Area 3B: Training and Technical Assistance: As part of the Vision 21 ISV Program, OVC will award a 36-month cooperative agreement to a qualified organization to provide TTA to up to three grantees who would receive funding under Purpose Area 3A. Any proposed strategy for delivering TTA to grant award recipients funded under Purpose Area 3A should include a comprehensive plan to increase the capacity of organizations participating in the funded project to increase access to mental health services to members of traditionally underserved populations.

    The award recipient under this purpose area will be required to devise a plan to deliver TTA to the grantees who receive funding under Purpose Area 3A. The following objectives support this goal:
    • Work with OVC to plan and conduct a 2-day in-person, grantee orientation conference, including: cooperating with OVC in identifying the location and dates for the meeting; cooperating with OVC and other DOJ components in obtaining approval for the costs associated with conducting the meeting; seeking OVC review and approval of the agenda and all presentation materials; procuring audio-visual equipment and support services; and managing all onsite logistics for the meeting;
    • Cooperate with OVC in devising a plan for ongoing TTA for all grantees through a combination of: periodic webinars and/or conference calls; annual, 2-day in-person meetings in years 2 through 4 of the award period; and annual onsite visits to each of the three grantees;
    • Provide training to grantees and their partner agencies designed to increase multicultural understanding and competency and strengthen their capacity to provide services that meet the needs of diverse populations;
    • Provide technical guidance to grantees on completing the required community needs assessment and strategic plan;
    • Conduct individual assessment of each grantee’s TTA needs and provide written report to OVC and the grantee; and
    • Develop and implement a customized plan for the delivery of TTA to each grantee through a combination of remote and onsite methods; and
    • Devise a strategy to develop peer-to-peer mentoring and support among grant award recipients.
LINK to RFP: https://ojp.gov/ovc/grants/pdftxt/FY2017-V21-Mental-Health-508.pdf

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